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RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Feb 23, 2017 1:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( and then there was a race , might have to start a new thread or change title )


Charlie Angus is officially in the NDP leadership race



Kyle Duggan

Thursday, February 23rd, 2017



And then there were two. NDP MP Charlie Angus has officially registered with Elections Canada to be a contestant in the race for the NDP leadership.

Elections Canada has quietly posted his registration information online, making him officially the second candidate to enter the race. The posting shows that he registered Monday of this week.

Speculation has been ramping up that Angus would soon announce a bid to replace Tom Mulcair as party leader.

Angus is hosting a party in Toronto Sunday at the Horseshoe Tavern, where he saw his first punk rock show as...

http://ipolitics.ca/2017/02/23.....ship-race/
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2017 8:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Angus officially enters NDP leadership race

“When Justin Trudeau talks about the middle class, we’re going to talk about the new working class,” Angus told a crowd of supporters at Toronto’s Horseshoe Tavern


Ainslie Cruickshank

Sunday, February 26th, 2017



NDP MP Charlie Angus announces his intention to run for the NDP federal leadership at Toronto's Horseshoe Tavern, on Sunday, February 26, 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young



At the bar where he saw his first punk show, northern Ontario MP Charlie Angus told Canadians he wants to be their next prime minister.

“It’s time we mixed things up in Ottawa. It’s time we brought a little bit of passion, a little bit of fire. That we made sure that words like reconciliation actually mean something,” said Angus, a one-time punk rocker himself, to cheers from the few hundred people packed into Toronto’s Horseshoe Tavern.

He chose this day – Sunday, February 26 – to officially enter the NDP leadership race two months ago.

http://ipolitics.ca/2017/02/26.....ship-race/
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2017 10:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( quebec mp Guy Caron has also just joined the ndp leadership race so now there is 3 official candidates )


Pundits' Guide‏@punditsguide · 5m5 minutes ago
.@GuyCaronNPD will be running on a programme of a "progressive sustainable economy" for the #NDPLdr.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2017 3:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is really a lame field. They may have potential, and no doubt they are bright young idealists. Julian is a guy whose activism largely consists of sitting on boards. Charlie Angus is the son of an MP, and is a cultural type. And Guy Caron is an academic economist.

But they are hardly 'seasoned' in politics.

How much life is left in today's NDP? It seems as if it is going back to square one, after its unfortunate loss to Trudeau's gang. It's as if their elders have looked at the next leader's job, and inferred that it would be a party in decline, on its way back down to Audrey levels of support. They were universally not interested.
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Mar 01, 2017 8:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Niki Ashton expected to enter NDP leadership race next week


The MP is said to want to carve out a space for herself as an advocate for women's issues.

Niki Ashton delivers a speech at the Ottawa Women's March on Jan. 21. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade


By CHELSEA NASH


PUBLISHED : Wednesday, March 1, 2017 12:00 AM



Keep your eyes peeled: Niki Ashton is likely to announce her intention to run for the leadership of the NDP next week, say two sources close to her office.

An NDP staffer who is affiliated with Ms. Ashton’s (Churchill-Keewatinook Aski, Man.) office, as well one of Ms. Ashton’s regular volunteers, each said separately they are expecting Ms. Ashton to announce either on the day before or the day after March 8.

The day marks the celebration of International Women’s Day, and the staffer said the timing is so Ms. Ashton can effectively carve out the “women’s angle” in what has so far been a male-dominated race.

The timing would also put her into the race a week before the first debate in Ottawa on March 12, something her volunteer said she would not want to miss.

When asked if she planned to announce her leadership that week, Ms. Ashton’s office responded with a written statement: “I am giving leadership serious consideration, based on numerous conversations with activists and with party members. Applying for the job of prime minister is not something to be done lightly. I plan to make my decision known soon.”

The NDP staffer said while she hasn’t heard anything from Ms. Ashton directly, she is certain Ms. Ashton is running, and 80 per cent sure the announcement will come next week. She said she is hearing whispers around the office about the timing, and noticing a lot of closed-door meetings between Ms. Ashton and the top party organizers.

The volunteer, who has been volunteering in Ms. Ashton’s office for years, said Ms. Ashton is really busy before and after International Women’s Day, which isn’t abnormal for her, but when asked what she is doing around the day itself, Ms. Ashton is rather secretive about the details. But, when asked by volunteers if she’s planning to announce then, she doesn’t deny anything, the volunteer said.

“I definitely think she’s joining the leadership and I’m definitely thinking it’s going to be the beginning of March,” said the volunteer. “When we were talking about her doing events, she did say the day before, the day of, and the day after she’s really busy, and when we asked what she’s doing the day before or the day after, she didn’t really say.”

The NDP staffer said the race so far, including the current candidates and those still considering their chances, has been “ridiculously masculine,” and that the male candidates don’t have as strong a record on women’s issues.

“An actual woman standing up to our feminist prime minister,” the staffer said, using air quotes around the word “feminist,” is what the party needs.

Both the staffer and volunteer asked not to be quoted by name because they were not authorized to speak publicly on Ms. Ashton’s behalf on this subject.

Alice Funke of Pundits Guide also said she had heard Ms. Ashton will be announcing the first week of March.


Ms. Ashton would be the only female candidate to enter the race at this point, which so far includes MPs Peter Julian (New Westminster-Burnaby, B.C.), Charlie Angus (Timmins-James Bay, Ont.), and Guy Caron (Rimouski-Neigette-Témiscouata-Les Basques, Ont). All three current contenders have announced their candidacy within the last three weeks.

Ms. Ashton has reason enough to position herself as an advocate for women’s rights. She founded the Women’s Forum, an annual event that features panel discussions and roundtables with MPs with the goal of advancing feminism and gender equality. Under the last government, Ms. Ashton put forward private member’s motion M-444, proposing a national action plan to address violence against women. The motion garnered support from all sides of the opposition House, including the Liberals, but was defeated by the majority Conservatives.


Ms. Ashton will be running against (clockwise) Guy Caron, Charlie Angus, Peter Julian, and possibly others in her bid for the NDP leadership. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade


She also appeared to be the only Member of Parliament to attend the Women’s March in Ottawa, a protest that took place in solidarity with one in Washington, D.C. the day after United States President Donald Trump’s inauguration. The march was in protest of Mr. Trump’s remarks about grabbing women “by the pussy” and calling his opponent, Hillary Clinton, a “nasty woman,” during one of the debates, among other things.

The NDP was the federal party with the highest percentage of female candidates in the last election. So far in the leadership, Ms. Ashton seems to be the only woman preparing for a run. Former MP Megan Leslie from Halifax was another name put forward as someone who could possibly run, but she has stayed firm in her decision not to.


Leadership contest to take place in ‘unprecedented’ format

The NDP are trying something new this time around to pick their leader. Robert Fox, the new national director for the party, says he hopes the system creates new levels of “drama” by stirring up more political competition.

The next leader of the party will be elected via a preferential ballot system, but one that can be altered in between rounds.

Party members will begin online voting on Sept. 18, the day after a “candidate showcase” is held in Toronto, where each candidate will be given the opportunity to make their case in front of an audience. It won’t be a debate, though. By that time, four party-hosted debates and four riding association-hosted debates will already have been held.

Members will submit their first ranked ballot between Sept. 18 and Oct. 1, at which point the first round of voting will be cut off at 10 a.m. The results of the first round will be announced later on the evening of Oct. 1.

To win, a candidate must get 50 per cent-plus one of the vote. If there is no clear winner after the first round, the voting continues to a second round, and the field will be cut down to the five candidates with the most votes.

During the second round, those members who cast their vote online can change their ballot, in case their number one choice was cut out of the race, or they were swayed after hearing another candidate’s positions. They have one week to change their votes. Those who submit a mail-in ballot, which will still be permitted, will not be allowed to change their vote. The party said around 15 to 20 per cent of the votes in the last leadership election were submitted by mail, but they are encouraging members to vote online this time around.

On Oct. 8, another event in another Canadian city will be held. If there is no clear winner yet again, the system continues week after week, dropping one candidate at a time, until Oct. 29.

With this format, the party has opted not to host a convention, but a possible series of regional events. If the voting continues until Oct. 29, organizers will try to visit regions across the country. But, there’s no way of telling just how many rounds of voting will be needed before a leader is chosen. It could be five weeks’ worth, or it could be one.

Current interim leader Tom Mulcair will not be attending these events, the party said. Instead, the party will host a separate event sometime in the fall to say farewell to the leader who took the party through the last election. Party organizers said they are not yet sure whether that will take place before or after a new leader has been chosen.

The party expects to spend approximately $700,000 on the leadership selection process.

http://www.hilltimes.com/2017/.....week/97842
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Mar 02, 2017 2:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( a new mainstreet poll has some dismal numbers for the federal ndp , downtown Toronto was once an area of great strength and home to a number of mp's over the years but according to poll , the ndp is only polling 8 % in Toronto and a historic low of 5 % downtown , as well 4 % in Etobicoke , 10 % North York and 11 % Scarborough , its really hard to believe there numbers have sunk that low downtown , the ndp must of really went out of style )



Federal NDP prospects in the gutter in downtown Toronto: poll

NDP has its work cut out in bright Liberal-red downtown core


Kyle Duggan

Thursday, March 2nd, 2017


The next federal Tory and NDP leaders will have their work cut out for them trying to take back the Toronto seats they once held — and the federal NDP faces an especially steep climb in the downtown core.

A new Mainstreet/Postmedia poll suggests that, while the provincial Liberals are struggling and stand to lose seats outside of downtown, it’s a much rosier picture federally for Liberals. The federal Grits are “leading in every single corner of the city,” with a 60 per cent hold across Toronto, the firm says.

At the moment, the...

http://ipolitics.ca/2017/03/02.....onto-poll/
RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Mar 04, 2017 12:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

NDP deputy says left not making compelling case


The Deputy Leader of Ontario's New Democratic Party wouldn't rule out a run for the party's federal leadership but Jagmeet Singh wouldn't make the declaration in Thunder Bay on Friday night.
16 shares

about 14 hours ago by: Jon Thompson

Jagmeet Singh
NDP Deputy Leader Jagmeet Singh speaks to Lakehead University students as a member of a panel lecture on Friday.


THUNDER BAY -- If politically progressive voices are going to lead, the Ontario New Democratic Party's deputy leader believes they're going to have to change their tune.

"People think the left is scary," Bramalea-Gore-Malton MPP Jagmeet Singh said after a panel lecture at Lakehead University on Friday.

"Progressive people haven't been able to frame an argument that connects people with an emotional connection as well as a logical connection. People vote against their interests, people vote against things like minimum wage, which would benefit society broadly speaking. People vote against things like having a national daycare plan because they want to see a tax return in their own mailbox.

"The argument can be made that if we pool our resources, we can come up with a service that's far better, which would benefit far more people and create a far better society. That argument hasn't been made in a compelling and unifying way."

Singh agrees with the argument former NDP leader Ed Broadbent made in the Globe and Mail Thursday, advising prospective party leaders not to "get caught up in the spurious debate so often found in the politics of the left."

Singh sees the classic class paradigm as one of those ideas with ballot-mobilizing potential, considering wealth distribution continues to polarize across Canada.


"Class is a massive issue," he said. "Right now we have a massive gap that's widening between those who have resources and those who don't. That's a unifying issue. Most people fall into the bracket where they're losing their opportunities and their access to resources."

Singh wouldn't rule out a run of his own for the party's federal leadership but he sees real vulnerability in Ontario's Liberal Party under Premier Kathleen Wynne.

If NDP Leader Andrea Horwath and her team can find ways of communicating policies to Ontarians on health, education, and energy, Singh feels he could be passing up an opportunity to govern if he jumps from the provincial to the federal stage.

"I'd be honoured to be a part of the team under Andrea's leadership. That would be an amazing opportunity, which is why I'm struggling with making the decision on running federal."

https://www.tbnewswatch.com/local-news/ndp-deputy-says-left-not-making-compelling-case-551931
Progressive Tory





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PostPosted: Sat Mar 04, 2017 2:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think Singh would make more sense as the Ontario NDP for now, and then maybe to federal politics in the future.

While she has had successes, Andrea Horwath has not been able to grow the NDP to the point where they could win an election. Wynne moved the Liberals to the left over the last few years and ate into some of the NDPs support, particularly in Toronto. If you look at current polling the NDPs support has failed to really increase, despite support for Wynne and her Liberals dropping off considerably. The Liberals still really aren't polling that poorly considering Wynne's personal numbers. The fact that the NDPs support hasn't been able to grow should be of concern for the party. Horwath is personally popular but her party's support seems to have stalled.

In an attempt to keep him in provincial politics, Horwath named Singh deputy leader prior to the last federal election. There could be some backrooms talks but at this moment it doesn't seem like there's chatter for her to move over to make way for him to be leader.

I think it'd make a lot more sense for him and the provincial party. She could even run federally for leader, she'd have a compelling case to make.

If he's looking for success, he'd have more luck finding it in Ontario than in federal politics. He's better known obviously, which is a big help. But I could see him winning over a lot of Liberal voters in Toronto and the GTA. He has this youthful Trudeau-esque appeal that could likely be popular in downtown Toronto and the nearby areas. In the 905 he'd likely be able to grow the NDP with the different ethnic communities, something they've struggled to do in the past.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Sat Mar 04, 2017 3:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If only there were some 'directorate' that were making these decisions, a 'political' HR department ... but there isn't. At least, let's hope there isn't.
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Mar 06, 2017 10:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Progressive Tory wrote:
I think Singh would make more sense as the Ontario NDP for now, and then maybe to federal politics in the future.

While she has had successes, Andrea Horwath has not been able to grow the NDP to the point where they could win an election. Wynne moved the Liberals to the left over the last few years and ate into some of the NDPs support, particularly in Toronto. If you look at current polling the NDPs support has failed to really increase, despite support for Wynne and her Liberals dropping off considerably. The Liberals still really aren't polling that poorly considering Wynne's personal numbers. The fact that the NDPs support hasn't been able to grow should be of concern for the party. Horwath is personally popular but her party's support seems to have stalled.

In an attempt to keep him in provincial politics, Horwath named Singh deputy leader prior to the last federal election. There could be some backrooms talks but at this moment it doesn't seem like there's chatter for her to move over to make way for him to be leader.

I think it'd make a lot more sense for him and the provincial party. She could even run federally for leader, she'd have a compelling case to make.

If he's looking for success, he'd have more luck finding it in Ontario than in federal politics. He's better known obviously, which is a big help. But I could see him winning over a lot of Liberal voters in Toronto and the GTA. He has this youthful Trudeau-esque appeal that could likely be popular in downtown Toronto and the nearby areas. In the 905 he'd likely be able to grow the NDP with the different ethnic communities, something they've struggled to do in the past.



I think it makes more sense for Singh to stay with the provincial ndp , it also be very challenging to run for federal leader and then have to run provincially again if he were to lose the federal ndp leadership race , have only a couple month break between elections

as to why the provincial ndp is not doing that well here ? think it has to go back to the ndp government we had in the 90's , it was pretty much a disaster from start to finish and tainted the ndp brand here

the provincial ndp has also remained oddly ineffective and never done well in parts of the province like eastern Ontario and Ottawa . in that area they always do poorly and haven't even elected an mpp in Ottawa in years and most elections in the city of Ottawa can barely even crack 10% of the vote

but polls do say Horwath is well likely on a personal level and her approval rating is much better than wynne who is doing dismal , but when it comes time for people to say who they'd vote for , some of the people who like horwath and disapprove of wynne say there still going to vote liberal ?

this really doesn't make a lot of sense and should give reason for the provincial ndp to dig deeper into the numbers and try and figure out what it take to win over these voters who clearly don't even like wynne at all
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Mon Mar 06, 2017 6:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Progressive Tory wrote:
I think Singh would make more sense as the Ontario NDP for now, and then maybe to federal politics in the future.

While she has had successes, Andrea Horwath has not been able to grow the NDP to the point where they could win an election. Wynne moved the Liberals to the left over the last few years and ate into some of the NDPs support, particularly in Toronto. If you look at current polling the NDPs support has failed to really increase, despite support for Wynne and her Liberals dropping off considerably. The Liberals still really aren't polling that poorly considering Wynne's personal numbers. The fact that the NDPs support hasn't been able to grow should be of concern for the party. Horwath is personally popular but her party's support seems to have stalled.

In an attempt to keep him in provincial politics, Horwath named Singh deputy leader prior to the last federal election. There could be some backrooms talks but at this moment it doesn't seem like there's chatter for her to move over to make way for him to be leader.

I think it'd make a lot more sense for him and the provincial party. She could even run federally for leader, she'd have a compelling case to make.

If he's looking for success, he'd have more luck finding it in Ontario than in federal politics. He's better known obviously, which is a big help. But I could see him winning over a lot of Liberal voters in Toronto and the GTA. He has this youthful Trudeau-esque appeal that could likely be popular in downtown Toronto and the nearby areas. In the 905 he'd likely be able to grow the NDP with the different ethnic communities, something they've struggled to do in the past.


I couldn't agree more.
The Ontario NDP seems to be cruising to opposition party in a PC Majority;

How long do you continue with Andrea Horwath?
Granted, she has been an improvement over Howard Hampton in terms of seats, but this election will be her third.

If they don't grow in a fairly significant way in the 416 at the expensive of the Liberals I would imagine that Singh would be a logical replacement with four years to establish himself whereas Federally by the time you have a leader you are nearly two years till the next election.
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Mar 13, 2017 7:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the ndp have had first debate and 4 candidates were there , all current mp's )


NDP leadership hopefuls square off in wide-ranging first debate


Stephanie Levitz, The Canadian Press
Published Sunday, March 12, 2017 7:00AM EDT
Last Updated Monday, March 13, 2017 7:19AM EDT


OTTAWA -- Four candidates for the leadership of the federal NDP sought Sunday to set the stage for their respective campaigns during a civil debate that offered as much opportunity for policy and political discussions as it did for personal insights.
• Scroll down or click here to recap the CTVNews.ca LIVE blog of the debate

Guy Caron, Charlie Angus, Niki Ashton and Peter Julian jovially sparred in both French and English on questions ranging from free trade negotiations to facing off against U.S. President Donald Trump, and also answered light-hearted questions on subjects like their favourite Quebec films, foods and winter sports.


NDP leadership debate
Guy Caron, left, Charlie Angus, Niki Ashton and Peter Julian react to the audience as they arrive on stage for the first debate of the federal NDP leadership race, in Ottawa on Sunday, March 12, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

But central to the discussion was how to restore the party's spirit after it was crushed by its demotion from Official Opposition status in the 2015 federal election.

Doing so means rebuilding not just the party but the progressive political movement in Canada, Ashton, a longtime MP from Manitoba, said.

"We aren't just a party that is here to win elections," she said.

"We are a party that is here to effect political change for 2019 and beyond."

The NDP soared to a historic result in 2011 under the leadership of Jack Layton to capture Official Opposition status in the House of Commons, and Layton's legacy loomed large during the debate with the candidates each highlighting their personal relationships with him.

None, however, went to any great lengths to invoke the man they're vying to replace, leader Tom Mulcair, who took over after Layton died and presided over the party's loss of 50 seats in the 2015 campaign.

All the candidates offered perspective on why that happened, from focusing too relentlessly on attacking the Conservatives rather than realizing their main opponent was the Liberals, and then being "out-lefted" by them.

The next election isn't about taking back the left as much as it's about providing a political response to appalling situations -- like a lack of affordable housing and the high costs of education, suggested Julian, who represents a suburban Vancouver riding.

"You'll find that all of my colleagues will be offering bold ideas because think we respond to the size and scope of the crises that so many Canadian families are feeling," he said afterwards.

But then, there is the question of Quebec. Candidates were asked specifically what they would do to rebuild the party's support in that province after it collapsed in the 2015 vote.

Having a civil debate on the issue of the niqab is one way forward, suggested Caron, one of the few NDP MPs to keep his seat in Quebec in 2015.

The NDP's position during a contentious debate on banning the wearing of face veils during citizenship ceremonies -- New Democrats were against it -- struck a sour note in Quebec and absolutely cost the party support, he said.

"This is a very serious debate and we have to face the debate in a very reasoned way rather than trying to politicize it the way other parties are doing it," he told reporters after.

There's hope to be found for the party in the fact Canadians did vote for progressive policies in the 2015 election in the form of the Liberal platform, and what the NDP must do is reach out to them when they discover the Liberals aren't delivering as promised, said Angus, who represents a northern Ontario riding.

"More and more people are tuning out and I think there's a real opportunity to be that authentic voice," he said.

The consensus among candidates for a need to connect to Canadians was one of several points of agreement -- others included the fact that climate change and income inequality are the two most pressing issues facing the country and there's also equal opposition to building pipelines.

So it was clear the candidates were looking for other ways to set themselves apart from one another; Julian focused often on his long history of party involvement and activism, Angus on his connections and conversations with ordinary folks like bartenders. Ashton defined herself directly as a "democratic socialist, and intersectional eco-feminist", while Caron's goal -- as the relative newbie in the group -- was for people to just meet him altogether.

The party also offered up an opportunity for personal insights, asking each a series of rapid-fire questions on things like their favourite foods as children and winter pastimes. For Caron and Angus, hockey, for Julian skiing and for Ashton -- going door-to-door canvassing.

The quartet of candidates will meet again for a debate on March 26 in Montreal, with a focus on questions from the youth wing. The party's leadership race remains open to new candidates until July 3, one considering a bid is Ontario deputy NDP leader Jagmeet Singh.

Party members will selected a new leader in October.


This is the liveblog of the debate on Sunday night.

http://www.ctvnews.ca/politics.....-1.3319897
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Mar 15, 2017 7:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( a new possible candidate for the ndp race , Pat Stogran ? and he isn't even a member of the ndp yet )



Former vets ombudsman considers NDP leadership bid, criticizes 'elite' Liberals and Tories

Trudeau and Harper 'cut from same cloth,' says former vets ombudsman

By Murray Brewster, CBC News Posted: Mar 14, 2017 4:04 PM ET| Last Updated: Mar 14, 2017 4:04 PM ET

Pat Stogran is not yet a member of the NDP. 'But I believe it's where I belong, because their heart is the right place,' he says.



Former veterans ombudsman Pat Stogran says he is considering a bid for the federal NDP leadership.

Until 2007, Stogran was a career soldier who led the first Canadian battle group into Kandahar during the Afghan war.

Stogran says he is worried about the direction of the country and what sort of environmental, social and security legacy will be left for his children and their children.

"I served, and I say we need a government with a vision," Stogran said. "I have been apolitical all of my life. I have never belonged to any party. And I have voted based on issues, not the colour of tie they wear."

At the moment, he isn't a member of the NDP.

It is a "huge handicap," Stogran said. "But I believe it's where I belong because their heart is the right place."


Stogran emphasized that he has not made up his mind about running for the leadership, but is being motivated by broken Liberal government promises, including those made to veterans.

Although the Liberals have poured billions of additional dollars into the benefits and treatment of ex-soldiers, they have yet to fulfil a campaign pledge to return to system of lifetime pensions as compensation for injuries.

1st veterans ombudsman

Handpicked to be the country's first veterans ombudsman by the former government of prime minister Stephen Harper, Stogran had many backroom battles with the bureaucracy over benefits and political indifference.

It culminated in 2010 when his term was not renewed and the disagreements with the Conservative government spilled out in the public. Stogran at the time described the attitude of Veterans Affairs as "penny pinching."

In making a bid for the NDP's top job, Stogran said he already brings a reputation of standing up for average people, who are often ignored.

He said he believes people are tired of politics as usual and they're fed up with "corporate elites" running the country through either the Conservatives or the Liberals.

"People have had a gut full of the initiatives of Harper, but [Prime Minister Justin] Trudeau is cut from the same cloth," said Stogran. "Same garbage in a different bag."

4 candidates in NDP race

There are currently four candidates in the race to replace Tom Mulcair: Guy Caron, Charlie Angus, Niki Ashton and Peter Julian.

NDP leadership debate
The four declared candidates for the NDP leadership so far, from left: Niki Ashton, Charlie Angus, Guy Caron and Peter Julian. (Canadian Press)

Each of them has long-established roots in the party, something Stogran does not.

The NDP's traditional fault lines — between being a progressive voice and mainstream electable — have re-emerged since Mulcair's ouster last year.

The party's soul-searching was on display at last weekend's leadership debate, as candidates struggled to explain the 2015 election loss.

NDP Leadership Debate 20170312
Charlie Angus speaks during the first debate of the federal NDP leadership race while Niki Ashton and Peter Julian look on, in Ottawa on March 12. (Justin Tang/Canadian Press)

"The left needs to retrench," said Stogran, who believes the party needs to be a rallying point for the disenfranchised.
"Government is about rule of law and human rights. Government is about helping us provide for families. You need pragmatic due diligence in government, but it's about taking care of people."

PTSD treatment

Stogran has been an outspoken advocate for better treatment of soldiers suffering with post-traumatic stress. In 2013, he told CBC News he was being treated for PTSD, which he attributed to the stress of his battles within government, as well as his overseas service.

The party's leadership race remains open to new candidates until July 3.

Ontario NDP deputy leader Jagmeet Singh is another person who is considering a bid for the leader's chair.

The results of the leadership contest will be announced in October.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politic.....-1.4024617
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Mar 16, 2017 8:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( an unknown unemployed man from Toronto wanted to run for ndp leadership but was blocked from doing so and now he Is suing the party )


Man barred from NDP leadership race asks court to overrule party


Gloria Galloway



OTTAWA — The Globe and Mail


Published Wednesday, Mar. 15, 2017 4:36PM EDT



A Toronto man who joined the New Democratic Party seven months ago is asking a judge to overturn the party’s decision to bar him from becoming a candidate in the current national leadership race, saying the disqualification process was both secretive and unfair.

Brian Graff, who dabbles in real estate but has been unemployed since 2011, filed an application in the Ontario Superior Court on Wednesday asking that the federal party be required to reconsider its decision “in accordance with a fair process.”

Mr. Graff’s lawyer, Nader Hasan, said the case shines light on the power of political parties to decide, on behalf of Canadians, who will be the country’s political leaders.

The parties’ “argument is they are the gatekeepers and they get to make the rules,” Mr. Hasan said in an interview with The Globe and Mail. “Our argument is that, because of the vital and public role that they play in narrowing down the class of people from whom the rest of Canada selects it leaders, they have to respect basic rules of procedural fairness.”

Mr. Graff was a Liberal until August, when he took out membership in the NDP. In October, he informed the party of his intention to run for leader because, he says, he did not see any candidate stepping forward to talk about the issues he considers most important, including unemployment.

“I wanted to see a really vibrant race with lots of opinions expressed, lots of ideas,” said Mr. Graff, “because I think the NDP needs to consider reforming itself or changing or whatever because it’s never formed a federal government.”

The party began vetting Mr. Graff, a process that lasted almost two months.

According to the application filed in court, Mr. Graff repeatedly asked for a list of criteria against which candidates are judged but it was never provided to him. Then, on Dec. 20, 2016, he was advised by Robert Fox, the party’s national director, that his candidacy was not accepted.

A party official is quoted in the court documents as saying this is the first time in NDP history that someone has been told they are not qualified to run for leader.

Mr. Graff said he was never given reasons for that decision but was told he had 48 hours to appeal – something he says he did without knowing the reasons he had been rejected. On Dec. 28, the appeal was thrown out by NDP officials, “again without providing him with any reasons, explanation or basis for their decision,” says the court application.

“The NDP’s conduct is particularly shocking given that it is a political party that prides itself on openness, transparency and equal opportunity,” says the document.

Mr. Graff’s application for judicial relief was filed just before the court offices closed for the day so party officials were not able to view them Wednesday. But Mr. Fox said the party “most certainly” has the right to decide who can run for its leadership and the rules are explicit about that. “We are absolutely confident that the process we have established is just and fair and that we’ve followed the procedures properly,” said Mr. Fox.

MPs Niki Ashton, Charlie Angus, Peter Julian and Guy Caron are officially in the leadership race to replace Tom Mulcair, who was voted out of his job a year ago by party members at a convention in Edmonton. Ballots to decide the winner will be cast in October.

Mr. Graff said he is not taking legal action solely for his own benefit. “As a member of the party,” he said, “I don’t want the party saying who I, as a member, can’t vote for.”

The court document also points out that, even if the party allows him to run for the leadership, he will have a difficult time raising the $30,000 that is required of all candidates and collecting 500 signatures of party members. At this point, he has no base of support.

Mr. Hasan said there is no question that the New Democratic Party has the right to decide who can run to be its leader.

“We’re saying that, if they want to vet out people, they at least have to respect basic principles of procedural fairness in a transparent and open way,” said Mr. Hasan. “This is not a closed club. This is not like a fraternity or a religious order where decisions affect only their own members. This has implications for all of Canada.”

http://www.theglobeandmail.com.....e34314320/
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
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Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Thu Apr 06, 2017 9:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( who ? )


Éric Grenier‏ @308dotcom · 4m4 minutes ago

Ibrahim Bruno El-Khoury has registered as an NDP leadership candidate, according to Elections Canada. #ndpldr
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an NDP leadership race without candidates ?

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