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RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Dec 08, 2016 4:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( this article explains that stein's effort was similar to other scam super Pac's and upset lefties voters may be more willing to donate to similar efforts now that trump is in


Why Jill Stein’s Recount Push is Bad News for Democrats


Alex Altman @aaltman82
11:20 AM ET
    


In the age of Trump, the scam PACs that have plagued Republicans could migrate across the aisle

Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein has now raised $7.2 million to fund vote recounts in Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. That’s more than twice the total Stein raised through the entire 2016 campaign, all to pursue a project that has effectively zero chance of changing the result of the presidential election.

Her own running mate is against it. Hillary Clinton’s campaign was against it. Democratic operatives say it’s a waste of time and money, or worse. Donald Trump calls it a “scam.”

Stein’s effort does raise a few red flags. She jacked up her fundraising goals (from $2.5 million to the current $9 million) as cash poured in, changed her estimates of attorneys’ fees and has furnished no concrete evidence of voting shenanigans. She’s raising money for recounts that may not happen, in a race where she played spoiler, and she’s been vague about what will happen to any money left over from the fundraising drive.

Yet campaign finance lawyers say there’s no indication that Trump’s charge is true. Stein may be draining grassroots resources, but she has so far spent the money the way she promised. The real danger for Democrats is that her doomed project is a sign of a problem that has longed plagued Republicans.

Throughout the Obama Administration, the GOP has struggled with the scourge of the “scam PAC.” These groups raise money by pledging to accomplish a certain goal—draft a candidate to run for office, or drive a policy goal—then use the cash to enrich themselves. The Federal Election Commission recently recommended that Congress crack down on fraudulent outfits, defining them as groups which “solicit contributions with promises of supporting candidates, but then disclose minimal or no candidate support activities while engaging in significant and continuous fundraising, which predominantly funds personal compensation for the committees’ organizers.”

Movement conservatives have long bemoaned the proliferation of scam PACs in their ranks. One reason for the phenomenon is the simplicity of the formula: pinpoint a source of grassroots outrage or excitement, rent a mailing list, pump out solicitations and reinvest the cash on ever-more fundraising appeals—all while pocketing a share of the proceeds. There are different theories why conservatives have been ripe for plunder: an aging, web-baffled base; a media bubble; the lack of a consensus leader; the ideological gulf between the party’s grassroots and its elected officials. But the primary reason is the party has been out of the White House and unable to achieve many of its signature promises. Scam PACs thrive on outrage.

But now the script is flipped. The Democratic base is furious about the results of the election, rippling with anger toward Trump and facing a leadership vacuum. Some nefarious entrepreneurs will try to wring profit from this sense of powerlessness. “I am sure we’ll see more groups popping up, more unscrupulous political operatives tapping into public dissatisfaction with Trump and public anger over his election,” says Brendan Fischer of the Campaign Legal Center.

Paul Jossey, a Virginia campaign-finance lawyer, has an idea about how they’ll do it. “If I wanted to make a million dollars tomorrow,” he says, “all I’d have to do is start a PAC, name it something like the ‘PAC Against Citizens United,’ buy some email lists, and in a month I’d have a million dollars or maybe more.” Jossey speaks from authority: he worked for a firm whose mission was to separate gullible Tea Partyers from their money, and he opened the playbook earlier this year in a piece for Politico. The structural conditions that give rise to scam PACs haven’t been present on the left, Jossey says, because the average small-dollar liberal donor has been reasonably happy with President Obama and ideologically in sync with congressional leaders like Nancy Pelosi.

But Democrats haven’t been entirely immune to the phenomenon. One political fundraiser who created a host of pro-Bernie Sanders websites was later charged with fraud. Jossey singles out another group called Progressives United PAC, founded by former Wisconsin Senator candidate Russ Feingold—the longtime campaign-finance reform advocate—as an example of a PAC that raised millions, spent little of it on the party’s political candidates, and funneled most of it toward staff salaries and more fundraising appeals. (The group has repeatedly defended its work and dismissed the charge, which surfaced during Feingold’s failed campaign to win back his Senate seat last month.) But “while there have been a few [scam PACs] here and there,” says Fischer, “it doesn’t seem to have been as endemic a problem on the left.”

It’s easy to imagine that changing. Obama is on his way out. Fury toward Trump is unlikely to abate. And the Democrats’ top negotiator on Capitol Hill will be incoming Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, a moderate deal-maker whose Wall Street ties are anathema to the ascendant liberal wing of the base.

In the age of Trump, the looming danger for Democrats may not be outright grift but rather that an avalanche of futile solicitations will siphon cash from worthier causes. Political fundraising is more or less a zero-sum game. Every buck a small donor sends toward Stein’s recount is a dollar that probably doesn’t go toward organizing at the local level or rebuilding shattered state parties.

And some of the biggest grassroots outfits on the progressive left specialize in peddling false hope. The Progressive Change Campaign Committee, which declined an interview request for this story, is currently asking its nearly 1 million members for $3 apiece to support efforts to reform the Electoral College and organize protests designed to convince electors to vote for Clinton instead.

Even when such groups aren’t asking for money, they may be preparing to profit off subscribers’ activism. MoveOn.org has garnered more than 400,000 signatures on a petition asking Congress to block Trump aide Steve Bannon’s appointment as a senior White House adviser. It makes no mention of the fact that the position, unlike Cabinet nominations, is not subject to Senate consent. The point of the exercise is to gather email addresses, which will be added to the list for future fundraising solicitations or sold or rented to like-minded groups.

But by the time the petitioner realizes this, there will be a new indignity to confront, and a new solicitation waiting in their inbox

http://time.com/4592583/jill-s.....-liberals/
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Dec 09, 2016 10:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Trump Picks Iowa Governor Branstad as China Ambassador

by
Jennifer Jacobs


December 6, 2016 — 10:35 PM EST Updated on December 7, 2016 — 11:13 AM EST


Nation’s longest-serving governor picked by president-elect


Branstad, China’s Xi have friendship dating back to 1985



Terry Branstad’s History With China’s Xi Jinping


President-elect Donald Trump will nominate Iowa Governor Terry Branstad, a longtime friend of Chinese President Xi Jinping, for Ambassador to China, the U.S.’s most important trade partner and its largest economic rival.

Jason Miller, a spokesman for Trump’s presidential transition operation, confirmed the selection in a conference call with reporters on Wednesday. Branstad, a Republican, has accepted the offer, three people close to the matter said on condition of anonymity.

The decision comes at a time of heightened tensions with China after Trump abandoned almost four decades of diplomatic protocol on Dec. 2 by speaking directly with the leader of Taiwan, which Beijing considers a rogue province. Trump has been critical of China’s currency policies and military build-up. He hasn’t named his choice for secretary of state, the top U.S. diplomatic post.




Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Lu Kang called Branstad an “old friend” of that nation’s people.

“We’d welcome him to play a bigger role in advancing China-U.S. relations,” the spokesman said at a regular briefing Wednesday. “No matter who takes this position, we’re willing to work together to push the Sino-U.S. relationship to consistent, healthy and steady development.”

Trump Tower Visit

Branstad arrived at Trump Tower in New York Tuesday afternoon with his wife, Chris, and his chief of staff, Michael Bousselot. A contingent of Trump’s top advisers gathered for the meeting with Branstad, including Trump’s chief of staff, Reince Priebus, chief strategist Steve Bannon, Donald Trump Jr. and Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, according to two people familiar with the matter.

An hour after Branstad went up the elevator to Trump’s office, he re-emerged in the lobby, where he told reporters he wouldn’t comment on whether he was offered a post.

“I’m really excited about the quality of people that he’s attracting to the cabinet,” Branstad said. “I’m very proud to have supported Donald Trump for president.”




Trump will be in Iowa on Thursday for a stop on his post-election victory tour. The longest-serving governor in U.S. history, Branstad, 70, started a second run as governor in 2011. He previously held the job from 1983 to 1999.

Branstad’s friendship with Xi may be one of the reasons Trump picked him for the ambassador post. Two days before the Nov. 8 presidential election, during a rally in Sioux City, Trump singled out Branstad as an ideal liaison to China. “You would be our prime candidate to take care of China,” Trump said in calling the governor to the stage.

Friends With Xi

Branstad and Xi met when China’s leader made his first trip to Iowa in 1985 during a sister-state exchange. At the time Xi was a young agricultural official from Hebei province, working as director of the Feed Association of Shijiazhuang Prefecture.

The two men have reconnected several times since then. Despite their cultural differences, the pair forged strong bonds and have used their mutual love of agriculture to bridge the gap between their respective countries on human rights, economic issues and other tensions.

Branstad in 2012 feted Xi, then China’s vice president, with an elaborate dinner at the Iowa Capitol in Des Moines, and days after Trump’s election embarked on a previously planned, week-long trade mission to China and Japan, his fourth trip to China in the last seven years.

Branstad, unlike some establishment Republicans in other states, was an enthusiastic backer of Trump even during some of the most difficult spells during the campaign. The governor’s older son, Eric, served as state director for Trump’s campaign.

Iowa favored Trump by about 9 percentage points over Democrat Hillary Clinton, after twice voting for President Barack Obama. Trump carried Iowa by the largest margin for a Republican since Ronald Reagan in 1980.

China is Iowa’s second-largest export market, behind Canada. Figures from the U.S.-China Business Council show Iowa exported $2.3 billion in goods and $273 million in services to China in 2015. Crop production accounted for some $1.4 billion of the exports. Agricultural machinery, chemicals and other products were also sold.

Among the main challenges facing the new ambassador will be Trump’s potential trade policy, including a vow to name China as a currency manipulator; state-sponsored computer hacking; and tensions surrounding China’s territorial claims in the South China Sea.

If Branstad is confirmed, it would trigger a domino effect in the state that would include Iowa getting its first female governor with the ascension of Lieutenant Governor Kim Reynolds, 59, Branstad’s desired political heir.


https://www.bloomberg.com/politics/articles/2016-12-07/trump-said-to-pick-iowa-governor-branstad-as-china-ambassador
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Dec 09, 2016 10:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Donald Trump Picks WWE Co-Founder Linda McMahon to Lead Small Business Administration


By Arlette Saenz


Dec 7, 2016, 7:48 PM ET



President-elect Donald Trump named former professional wrestling executive Linda McMahon as his pick to lead the Small Business Administration.

"My America First agenda is going to bring back our jobs and roll back the burdensome regulations that are hurting our middle-class workers and small businesses. To help push our agenda forward, I am pleased to nominate Linda McMahon as the head of the Small Business Administration," Trump said in a statement announcing the pick. "Linda has a tremendous background and is widely recognized as one of the country’s top female executives advising businesses around the globe."


McMahon, who met with the president-elect at Trump Tower last week, was the co-founder and former chief executive officer of the WWE franchise. She unsuccessfully ran for the U.S. Senate in Connecticut in 2010 and 2012.

Linda McMahon, along with her husband, Vince McMahon, the chairman and CEO of WWE, was among the most prolific donors in the 2016 election cycle, according the Center for Responsive Politics. The couple gave more than $9 million to candidates, parties, and political action committees and outside groups this year.

Trump has appeared on WWE programming in the past and was inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame in 2013.

In an interview with Yahoo News in May, Linda McMahon, who initially supported Gov. Chris Christie, R-New Jersey, for president, criticized Trump for making disparaging comments about women but still expressed faith in his ability to lead the country should he become president, saying "he will hire good people for advice."

“Those [comments] were just over the top; they were deplorable, objectionable absolutely,” Linda McMahon said. “He’s not helping, certainly, to put women in the best light. Maybe he regrets them, maybe he doesn’t. I realize he punches hard when he punches back, but that’s just over the top. I wish that no candidate would make those comments.”

“He is the front-runner, and I think he surprised a lot of people,” Linda McMahon said. “He really is a vessel of this angst and unrest in this country. He said it straight out, didn’t worry about being politically correct. ... I think that really is a seed of a great deal of his popularity. I think Donald has proven himself in a lot of areas to be an astute businessman. ... I think that he will hire good people for advice.”

The administrator of the Small Business Administration is a position of Cabinet-status rank. The post will require Senate confirmation

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics.....d=44043872
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Dec 09, 2016 11:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

WI Elections Commission: Recount 82% complete; Clinton gains 61 votes on President-elect Trump

Posted 3:07 pm, December 8, 2016, by Madeline Anderson and AP Wire Service, Updated at 05:38AM, December 9, 2016



BAY VIEW -- Wisconsin's presidential election recount is nearly complete, with Milwaukee County finishing Thursday evening, December 8th.

The Wisconsin Elections Commission reported Thursday, December 8th that more than 82 percent of the vote had been counted by the close of business on Wednesday, and that Democrat Hillary Clinton had gained just 61 votes on Republican Donald Trump.

President-elect Trump won the state by more than 22,000 votes.

Here is Thursday's update from the Elections Commission:


47 of 72 counties have now completed the recount.

Approximately 82 percent of ballots have been recounted.

Trump/Pence originally led Clinton/Kaine by 22,177. So far, not including the City of Milwaukee, Clinton/Kaine have gained 61 more votes than Trump/Pence, but still trail.

Including the December 7 results, Trump/Pence are up 495 votes, Clinton/Kaine are up 556 votes, Castle/Bradley are up 20 votes, Johnson/Weld are up 63 votes, Stein/Baraka are up 64 votes, Moorehead/Lilly are up 8 votes, and De la Fuente/Steinberg are up 15 votes.

Important Note: The changes in vote totals do not include the City of Milwaukee, which has reported partial numbers for individual reporting units (wards or combinations of wards) because it is recounting absentee ballots separately. Milwaukee is included in the 82 percent completed.

Joe Czarnezki
Joe Czarnezki

"The results of the election are not going to change in this recount," Joe Czarnezki, Milwaukee County clerk said.

In Milwaukee County, tabulators spent Thursday double checking all 29,000 ballots cast on November 8th in West Allis -- the final municipality still working to complete the recount in Milwaukee County.

"To wrap this up as the final community in the county feels like a real achievement," Monica Schultz, West Allis city clerk said.

Presidential recount

Czarnezki said the only hiccup during the recount came Wednesday, when officials in the City of Greenfield discovered 400-some ballots in an office at City Hall.

Greenfield City Clerk Jennifer Goergen issued this statement to FOX6 News on Thursday:


"City of Greenfield ballots have been accounted for. During the recount it was realized wards 1, 3, and 12 did not have all their ballots from the polls on Election Day. Poll workers in these wards did not properly package the ballots at the end of Election Day for transport to Milwaukee County, which resulted in staff locating the ballots in the office with election paperwork that had been returned from the polls Election Day. Staff immediately brought the ballots to the recount to be counted. These ballots had been counted by the voting machines on Election Day and had been included in the City’s election night voting results. In the future, poll workers will hand count ballots post-election to verify the number of voted ballots packaged for transport match the voting machine total. All recount information is posted by the Milwaukee County Election Commission Board of Canvass on Wisconsin Election Commission’s website at: http://elections.wi.gov/."

Presidential recount

Czarnezki said the 400-some ballots were hand counted to make sure they matched up with the number of ballots cast on November 8th.

"We worked long hours. Some days it was 12, 14-hour days. But we got the job done," Czarnezki said.

Shortly before 8:00 p.m. Thursday evening, Milwaukee County closed the book on its recount.

George Martin, Representative for the Green Party of Wisconsin, spoke as the recount finished. He praised Milwaukee County clerks and staff for their hard work.



The deadline for the recount to be completed in Wisconsin is Monday, December 12th.

Presidential recount

A hearing in federal court was scheduled for Friday, December 9th on a lawsuit filed by a President-elect Doanld Trump voter and two pro-Trump super PACs seeking an end to the recount.

Presidential recount

Green Party candidate Jill Stein requested the recount and is paying for it.

She is also pressing for one in Pennsylvania and pursued one in Michigan that was halted prematurely on Wednesday

http://fox6now.com/2016/12/08/.....ect-trump/
RCO





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PostPosted: Sun Dec 11, 2016 10:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( add one more win to the GOP's total for this year )


DOMINANCE41 minutes ago

John Kennedy Wins Louisiana Senate Race



Republican John Kennedy won the Louisiana runoff election on Saturday, giving the GOP a 52-majority in the upper chamber. Kennedy beat Public Service Commissioner Foster Campbell to replace Sen. David Vitter, the Associated Press reported. Louisiana Gov. John Edwards congratulated Kennedy on the win, saying in a statement he looks forward to working with him “to secure additional funding


for flood relief, to make long term investments in our infrastructure and to bring Louisiana’s federal tax dollars home to help our people.” Despite challenges ahead, he said, “we can deliver great things for the people of Louisiana.” Republican National Committee co-chair Sharon Day also issued a statement on Kennedy’s victory, saying it “caps a year of historic Republic wins up and down the ballot.” Louisiana GOP Chairman Roger Villere said “the Republican brand continues to be the brand of choice for Louisiana voters” after the win

http://www.thedailybeast.com/c.....ce=copyurl
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Mon Dec 12, 2016 6:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:
( add one more win to the GOP's total for this year )


DOMINANCE41 minutes ago

John Kennedy Wins Louisiana Senate Race



Republican John Kennedy won the Louisiana runoff election on Saturday, giving the GOP a 52-majority in the upper chamber. Kennedy beat Public Service Commissioner Foster Campbell to replace Sen. David Vitter, the Associated Press reported. Louisiana Gov. John Edwards congratulated Kennedy on the win, saying in a statement he looks forward to working with him “to secure additional funding


for flood relief, to make long term investments in our infrastructure and to bring Louisiana’s federal tax dollars home to help our people.” Despite challenges ahead, he said, “we can deliver great things for the people of Louisiana.” Republican National Committee co-chair Sharon Day also issued a statement on Kennedy’s victory, saying it “caps a year of historic Republic wins up and down the ballot.” Louisiana GOP Chairman Roger Villere said “the Republican brand continues to be the brand of choice for Louisiana voters” after the win

http://www.thedailybeast.com/c.....ce=copyurl


While this is nice for the GOP;
Based on some of the Democrat seats coming up in 2018 it looks like the President Elect may have at least four years of control in both houses.
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Dec 12, 2016 6:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the recounts are officially over )


Recount Efforts End: Trump Wins in Wisconsin, Pennsylvania

By marc levy and scott bauer, associated press

·
PHILADELPHIA — Dec 12, 2016, 6:12 PM ET



Presidential election recount efforts came to an end Monday in Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, with both states certifying Republican Donald Trump as the winner in contests that helped put him over the top in the Electoral College stakes.

Trump's victory in Wisconsin was reaffirmed following a statewide vote recount that showed him defeating Democrat Hillary Clinton by nearly 23,000 votes. Meanwhile, a federal judge issued a stinging rejection of a Green Party-backed request to recount paper ballots in Pennsylvania's presidential election and scan some counties' election systems for signs of hacking.

Green Party candidate Jill Stein successfully requested and paid for the Wisconsin recount while her attempts for similar statewide recounts in Pennsylvania and Michigan were blocked by the courts.

Stein got only about 1 percent of the vote in each of the three states, which Trump narrowly won over Clinton. Stein argued, without evidence, that voting machines in all three states were susceptible to hacking. All three states were crucial to Trump's victory, having last voted for a Republican for president in the 1980s.

The numbers barely budged in Wisconsin after nearly 3 million votes were recounted. Trump, a billionaire New York real estate mogul, picked up 131 votes and won by 22,748 votes. The final results changed just 0.06 percent.

Stein said she was disappointed not all Wisconsin counties did hand recounts, although most did. She said the goal of the recount was never to change the outcome but to validate the vote and restore confidence in the system.

"The recount in Wisconsin raised a number of important election integrity issues that bear further assessment and serious action to ensure we have integrity and confidence in our electoral system," she said, without naming what they were.

Wisconsin Elections Commission Chairman Mark Thomsen said before certifying the recount results there was no evidence of a hack.

In Pennsylvania, state officials certified the results of the election in the hours following the decision by U.S. District Judge Paul S. Diamond.

Trump beat Clinton in the state by about 44,000 votes out of 6 million cast, or less than 1 percent, according to the final tally after weeks of counting provisional and overseas ballots. Green Party voters had petitioned some counties to do partial recounts, affecting few votes, county officials said.

Diamond said there were at least six grounds that required him to reject the Green Party's lawsuit, which had been opposed by Trump, the Pennsylvania Republican Party and the Pennsylvania attorney general's office.

Suspicion of a hacked Pennsylvania election "borders on the irrational" while granting the Green Party's recount bid could "ensure that no Pennsylvania vote counts" given Tuesday's federal deadline to certify the vote for the Electoral College, wrote Diamond, an appointee of Republican former President George W. Bush.

"Most importantly, there is no credible evidence that any 'hack' occurred, and compelling evidence that Pennsylvania's voting system was not in any way compromised," Diamond wrote.

He said the lawsuit suffered from a lack of standing, potentially the lack of federal jurisdiction and an "unexplained, highly prejudicial" wait before filing last week's lawsuit, four weeks after the Nov. 8 election.

The decision was the Green Party's latest roadblock in Pennsylvania after hitting numerous walls in county and state courts. Green Party-backed lawyers argue it was possible that computer hackers changed the election outcome and that Pennsylvania's heavy use of paperless machines makes it a prime target. Stein also contended Pennsylvania has erected unconstitutional barriers to voters seeking a recount.

A lawyer for the Green Party members said Monday they were disappointed and unable to immediately say whether they would appeal.

"But one thing is clear," said the lawyer, Ilann Maazel. "The Pennsylvania election system is not fair to voters and voters don't know if their votes counted, and that's a very large problem."

A federal judge halted Michigan's recount last week after three days. Trump won Michigan by fewer than 11,000 votes out of nearly 4.8 million votes cast.

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics.....e-44139924
Toronto Centre





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PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2016 5:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Trump will get the chance to perform. Admittedly I cannot stand the guy, however he won and he needs his chance to show what he can do.

But his rhetoric to drain the swamp is not looking so good.

Ok he drained it, but now hes turned it into a septic tank .

His choices are rich men with no Govt experience, some Military dudes w no Govt experience or other rich white men w no govt experience.

Oh...and taking time out of an otherwise very busy agenda to meet w God himself...er...Kanye.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Dec 14, 2016 12:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jayzuz, TC, I know the appeal of someone who is not managerial in the government worker style, but shouldn't you at least wait until he is sworn in. TC? Just for appearance's sake? Nobody expects you to have an open mind.

Trump is NOT the guy that the newspapers told you about. Understand, cut current estimates are that the Hillary spent $1.2 billion! Trump spent far less, and relied on paid ads far less. In a sense, his campaign was a 21st-century version of Harry Truman's whistle-stop campaign of 1948, when Truman also won unexpectedly.

He spent far less on TV ads, and didn't have polling or 'analytics' except in the most rudimentary fashion. He used his rallies as his research tool. There were times when he asked his crowd -- Is she 'crooked HIllary' or 'evil Hillary'? -- and he paid attention. That's how he came to the idea of building a wall that Mexico would pay for.

In the early rallies, particularly, when the primaries were on, he was very free form, but he put together much of his platform from the crowd reactions to his proposals, which were often over the top. But later, when he started using a teleprompter, his speeches were well-crafted and more precise. And they often 'walked back' the hyperbolic statements. (Not with the wall -- it became a trade mark.) And if you look at his platform, it clearly has a lot of appeal.

Trump did what Harper couldn't do -- he went around the media to talk to the electorate directly. Of course, that exaggerates somewhat, but he was having several rallies a week, for much of the campaign. He used the media, but he didn't pay much for it.

A lot of Americans want 'out' of Obama's America. They don't like the racial strife, the loss of international prestige, etc If they thought George W was bad, Obama was worse. There has been so much 'empowering' of different nationalities and skin tones that whites are becoming race-conscious. (That's what the alt-right is.)

The trouble is, the media reported the 'over-the-top' statements as if they were a factual representation of what Trump planned to do. He's a promoter -- they cited his hyperbole. But look, at the Republican convention, Trump had the crowd cheering to protect Americans, even gay Americans from Orlando-type violence. And he even pointed it out to them! He got a bigger share of hispanic and black votes than either McCain or Romney.

I don't know the personnel of his cabinet, but I know that TC's demographic in the US has their heads exploding, while the other side is delirious with what they see. The Democrats have hitched their wagon to Obama's coalition, and it is dissolving before their eyes. They don't know whether it's the Russians or the Chinese, but they can't believe the guy with the orange hair could pull this off by himself.

It's the biggest Republican victory in decades!

Personally, I think he's got an uphill struggle, but at least he has some promise of facing the problems. Obama ran away from everything and, as they say, just "kicked the can down the road". We shall see.
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 14, 2016 7:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, he will get his chance and I will watch and listen. I dont hold much hope right now, especially in light of his appointments.

I am sorry, but Trump is the guy we read about. He has no clue what the Constitution is about, regards Twitter as a legitimate way to advise the electorate, dodges the press (which I can understand to some degree) when he shouldnt, is far too loose with his adoration/condescension of women (see Ivanka) and well...thats enough for me.
Quote:
A lot of Americans want 'out' of Obama's America. They don't like the racial strife, the loss of international prestige, etc If they thought George W was bad, Obama was worse. There has been so much 'empowering' of different nationalities and skin tones that whites are becoming race-conscious. (That's what the alt-right is.)

Im sorry but I dont see that the same way.
Racial strife has not come from Obama, thats come from within, cops shooting people, the realization of some people being above the law. I would think some of the empowerment of black americans finally speaking out has come from the USA having a black President.

The laughing at and mocking of SJW that is occuring now would have been replaced with redneck grunts loading thier guns had Hillary won, which was prevalent when the closing days were near. That much can be seen on numerous gun sites in the US.
Both sides are ridiculous.

Trump was bleating about not accepting the results since they were fixed. The right was ready to go full idiocy had she done so. But Trump won and when the same tactics get applied (recount etc) the right mocks with mouth agape...."how could they"

Two sides of the same coin.
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Dec 14, 2016 8:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dems scramble to prevent their own from defecting to Trump


Published December 14, 2016
· FoxNews.com


Senate Democrats have been scrambling to prevent two of their members from taking a post in the Trump administration, trying to prevent any defection that could bolster Republicans’ control of the chamber.

They recently launched a “full court press” to retain Sens. Joe Manchin, of West Virginia, and Heidi Heitkamp, of North Dakota, after each met with Republican President-elect Donald Trump, one senior Senate Democrat told Fox News.

Manchin now appears less likely to bolt -- after saying he wants to remain in the Senate and being passed over for Energy secretary -- which puts the focus squarely on Heitkamp.

The first-term lawmaker, who faces reelection in 2018 in a conservative state, still appears in the running for the Agriculture secretary post.

A Trump transition team source told Fox News the president-elect “really wants her” for the job.

Either departure would poses short- and long-term challenges for Senate Democrats.

If Heitkamp left, her seat could remain empty for months, meaning Democrats would have one less vote to stop any of Trump’s first-100-day initiatives, which could including getting a Supreme Court nominee confirmed in the Senate or passing a tax overhaul.

The North Dakota legislature last year changed its laws so that a Senate seat remains vacant, without a place-holder senator, until it is filled in a special-election vote held within 95 days of a resignation.

In the longer-term, Senate Republicans would have a solid chance of winning Heitkamp’s seat in a special election and adding to their 52-48 member majority.

In West Virginia, the governor would under the law appoint a temporary replacement and hold a special election within 48 to 120 days to fill the seat for the remainder of the term which ends in 2017.

West Virginia’s Democratic governor likely would appoint a Democrat to fill the seat in the interim.

As a Democrat in an increasingly conservative state, Manchin initially had appeared at risk of leaving.

And his words and actions in recent weeks -- criticizing Senate Democratic leader Harry Reid and risking a government shutdown over coal miner benefits -- suggested a willingness to depart the Senate, or at least prepare for a tough reelection fight in 2018 in a state that went for Trump over Democrat Hillary Clinton 68-26 percent.

Manchin last month chastised Reid for calling Trump after his White House win a “sexual predator,” saying Reid’s remarks were an “absolute embarrassment” and “needlessly … tearing this country apart.”

Reid recently told CNN that Manchin’s comments were “his way to get out the door.”

Democrats, in an apparent effort to solidify their caucus, recently made Manchin part of their leadership team. And Trump’s official decision Wednesday to pick former Texas Republican Gov. Rick Perry for Energy secretary, for which Machin was being considered, settled the speculation for now.

“I was humbled to be considered for the Secretary of Energy position,” Manchin said in a statement. “I have dedicated my life in public service to doing what is best for the people of West Virginia. Right now, I believe that I can best serve my state of West Virginia in the United States Senate.”

Heitkamp and Manchin are among 10 Democrats in the chamber seeking reelection in 2018.

Trump has only three remaining Cabinet posts to fill -- Agriculture, Interior and Veterans Affairs.

http://www.foxnews.com/politic.....trump.html
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 15, 2016 2:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Toronto Centre wrote:

Quote:
A lot of Americans want 'out' of Obama's America. They don't like the racial strife, the loss of international prestige, etc If they thought George W was bad, Obama was worse. There has been so much 'empowering' of different nationalities and skin tones that whites are becoming race-conscious. (That's what the alt-right is.)

Im sorry but I dont see that the same way.
Racial strife has not come from Obama, thats come from within, cops shooting people, the realization of some people being above the law. I would think some of the empowerment of black americans finally speaking out has come from the USA having a black President.

The laughing at and mocking of SJW that is occuring now would have been replaced with redneck grunts loading thier guns had Hillary won, which was prevalent when the closing days were near. That much can be seen on numerous gun sites in the US.
Both sides are ridiculous.

Trump was bleating about not accepting the results since they were fixed. The right was ready to go full idiocy had she done so. But Trump won and when the same tactics get applied (recount etc) the right mocks with mouth agape...."how could they"

Two sides of the same coin.


I want to take on your reading from the catechism on the racial strife. First, the Trayvon Martin fiasco was put into the national spotlights a month after events, when Obama said if he had a son, he'd look lik Trayvon. Of course, they thought he was a white guy at the time. Out of that came Black Lives Matter, which started as a website to report racial violence. Then came Ferguson, with the lie that Brown had his hands up, and saying "Don't shoot." That turned out false, but that's when DeRay McKeeson quit his job and became a full-time organizer for Black Lives Matter. He was only at the forefront of a cadre of 'community organizers' that arrive in places like Ferguson and 'organize' -- if you know what I mean. Stir up racial animosity.

McKeeson has had several long visits with Obama at the White House. The Black Lives Matter crowd could be run out of the Oval Office for all we know. I am not saying it is, but it at least has the ear of power.

Obama also changed regulations around Title IX, which has helped the campuses become such racist hives, with their 'cis-gendered white students' crap. Nobody I know talks like that. Title IX makes implementation of certain enforcement policies essential for continued federal government patronage -- grants etc. It breeds an environment on campus that seems to be in a frankly pathological state right now.

I don't think that's an exotic opinion these days.

These policies seem to have distorted values a lot of people accept, but they seem to have gone overboard. Like, yes, equality is a good thing ... but what does that have to do with putting transgendered bathrooms in all the high schools in Ontario? I hope you see my point. There's a lot of bafflegab out there.

Don't forget, Americans are coming out of some pretty devastating economic blows ... a lot of them have lost the equity they held in their houses, for example. They are profiting from an apparently booming stock market at the moment, but there's a worry about the future. Their kids are turning all wormy. Jobs are disappearing, it isn't an illusion.

I think Obama has to take responsibility for the tensions people are feeling. He has played a role in creating them, at least in the way of President can. And that is something to marvel at.
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 15, 2016 10:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wed Dec 14, 2016 | 12:11pm EST

Trump chooses congressman, former SEAL Zinke as interior secretary


U.S. Representative Ryan Zinke (R-MT) arrives for a meeting with U.S. President-elect Donald Trump at Trump Tower in Manhattan, New York City, U.S., December 12, 2016. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid



By Steve Holland | WASHINGTON

President-elect Donald Trump has chosen first-term Republican U.S. Representative Ryan Zinke of Montana, a former Navy SEAL commander, as his interior secretary, a senior transition official said on Tuesday.

Zinke, 55, will be nominated to head the Interior Department, which employs more than 70,000 people across the United States and oversees more than 20 percent of federal land, including national parks like Yellowstone and Yosemite.

Zinke's choice was something of a surprise since some Republican officials wanted him to challenge Democratic U.S. Senator Jon Tester of Montana in the 2018 elections.

Zinke emerged after Trump had toyed with the idea of nominating U.S. Representative Cathy McMorris Rodgers of Washington state for the position.

He is a proponent of keeping public lands under federal ownership, putting him at odds with some in his Republican Party who are more favorable to privatization or placing them under the control of states.

It remains unclear where Zinke would stand on opening up more federal lands to increased drilling and mining, something Trump promised he would do as president.

Trump's official energy platform calls for opening "onshore and offshore leasing on federal lands, eliminate moratorium on coal leasing, and open shale energy deposits."

A Trump aide told Reuters last week that McMorris Rodgers had been picked for the post. She had met Trump at his golf resort in Bedminster, New Jersey, shortly after the president-elect began his Cabinet search.

On Tuesday, a source close to the congresswoman said she had never been offered the job.

"It was an honor to be invited to spend time with the president-elect, and I’m energized more than ever to continue leading in Congress as we think big, reimagine this government, and put people back at the center of it," McMorris Rodgers said in a Facebook post.

Zinke had been an early Trump supporter, backing the New York businessman for president in May. His nomination must now be confirmed by the Republican-controlled Senate.

"Congressman Zinke is a strong advocate for American energy independence, and he supports an all-encompassing energy policy that includes renewables, fossil fuels and alternative energy," Trump spokesman Jason Miller said before a meeting on Monday between Zinke and Trump at Trump Tower in New York.

Zinke, a member of the House of Representatives subcommittee on natural resources, has voted for legislation that would weaken environmental safeguards on public land.

But, unlike other candidates who were on the short list for the interior secretary job, Zinke opposes the transfer of public lands to the states, a position that echoes Trump's.


PUBLIC LANDS

Trump has said he does not think public land should be turned over to the states and should be protected.

"I don’t like the idea because I want to keep the lands great, and you don’t know what the state is going to do," Trump said in an interview with Field & Stream magazine in January.

Trump said putting states in control of public land would make it easier to sell it off for energy or commercial development. He thinks the federal government needs to focus on conservation.

"I mean, are they going to sell (states) if they get into a little bit of trouble? I don't think it's something that should be sold," he said. "We have to be great stewards of this land. This is magnificent land."


Related Coverage
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In July, Zinke resigned as a delegate to the Republican nominating convention because the party platform called for transferring public lands to the states.

"What I saw was a platform that was more divisive than uniting," Zinke told the Billings Gazette. "At this point, I think it's better to show leadership."

Public land comprises more than 30 percent of Montana, according to the Montana Wilderness Association.

The League of Conservation Voters, which ranks lawmakers on their environmental record, gave Zinke an extremely low lifetime score of 3 percent.

The Wilderness Society, a leading conservation group, said it was concerned by Zinke's support for logging, drilling and mining on public lands.

The Interior Department also oversees the Bureau of Indian Affairs and handles tribal policy.

Under Obama, the department played a big role in efforts to curb the effects of climate change by limiting fossil fuel development in some areas.

http://www.reuters.com/article.....SKBN1422R1
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 15, 2016 12:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:
Dems scramble to prevent their own from defecting to Trump

Published December 14, 2016
· FoxNews.com

Senate Democrats have been scrambling to prevent two of their members from taking a post in the Trump administration, trying to prevent any defection that could bolster Republicans’ control of the chamber.

They recently launched a “full court press” to retain Sens. Joe Manchin, of West Virginia, and Heidi Heitkamp, of North Dakota, after each met with Republican President-elect Donald Trump, one senior Senate Democrat told Fox News.

http://www.foxnews.com/politic.....trump.html


I don't think Manchin would cross;
He will just vote with the GOP on a lot of items and the Democrats will simply take it because they would rather have him in the caucus than primary him out and potentially lose West Virginia in two years.

Heitkamp on the other hand...
My understanding was she was being consider for cabinet and would have needed to leave her Senate seat in the process and that special election would have likely yielded a GOP Senator in the process.

North Dakota is a state that went Trump by more than 30% and Heitkamp beat Rick Berg in 2012 by about 3000 votes, she is already in line with a lot of issues the GOP hold dear and a cross may not be out of the question.

I would imagine North Dakota, Indiana, and Montana are the most at risk Democrat Senate seats in 2016 to begin with.
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 17, 2016 10:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hillary Clinton's holiday party 'like a wake'


Published December 17, 2016
· FoxNews.com


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Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s holiday party at a posh New York City hotel Thursday was reportedly a somber affair since it has only been just over a month since her election loss.

“It was like a wake with a band,” quipped one guest who was at the Plaza Hotel told The New York Post’ Page Six. The holiday party included top-tier donors, VIP boosters and campaign advisers.

The source said, “It was a little bit of group therapy and a lot of love” among the losing Democratic rainmakers.

Spotted in the crowd were Clinton advisers Huma Abedin, John Podesta and Robby Mook, donors Alan Patricof, Bernard Schwartz, Marc Lasry, Jay Snyder and Robert Zimmerman, designers Vera Wang and Tory Burch, plus Anna Wintour, Harvey Weinstein and restaurateur Danny Meyer.

There has been a confluence of news stories that may have contributed to the feelings. Clinton, herself, earlier this month called the rise of so-called fake news an epidemic in American politics, saying it is “now clear” fake news has “real-world consequences.”

Clinton is apparently not the only Democrat still getting over last month’s elections.

President Obama put Russia's Vladimir Putin on notice Friday that the U.S. could use offensive cyber muscle to retaliate for interference in the U.S. presidential election, his strongest suggestion to date that Putin had been well aware of campaign email hacking.

"Whatever they do to us, we can potentially do to them," Obama declared.

First Lady Michelle Obama also told Oprah that the country is now “feeling what not having hope feels like, you know? Hope is necessary.”

http://www.foxnews.com/politic.....-wake.html
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