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RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
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Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Mon Nov 14, 2016 5:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( wow advance poll turnout was massive , personally can't recall any by-election where turnout for the advance polls was better than in past elections in the same riding )


Estimate of advance voter turnout for the Niagara West--Glanbrook and Ottawa--Vanier provincial by-elections

TORONTO, Nov. 14, 2016 /CNW/ - As of Monday November 14, 2016, preliminary figures indicate that 10,916 voters cast their ballot at advance polls in the Niagara West—Glanbrook provincial by-election. In comparison, 7,170 voters cast their ballot at advance polls in Niagara West—Glanbrook in the 2014 General Election.

And as of Monday November 14, 2016, preliminary figures indicate that 10,694 voters cast their ballot at advance polls in the Ottawa—Vanier provincial by-election. In comparison, 5,113 voters cast their ballot at advance polls in Ottawa—Vanier in the 2014 General Election.

Advance polling took place between Saturday November 5, 2016 and Friday November 11, 2016. Voters also had the opportunity to vote in person by special ballot at the local returning office, by home visit, or by mail.

Election Day is on Thursday November 17, 2016. An estimated 101,767 eligible voters will be able to cast their ballot in the Niagara West—Glanbrook provincial by-election and an estimated 82,545 eligible voters will be able to cast their ballot in Ottawa—Vanier. Eligible voters are encouraged to visit elections.on.ca to find out where, when and how to vote.

There are nine candidates running to fill the seat as Member of Provincial Parliament for the electoral district of Niagara West—Glanbrook, and 11 candidates running in the electoral district of Ottawa—Vanier. A complete list of candidates is available at elections.on.ca.

There will be approximately 585 election workers at 64 voting locations across the electoral district of Niagara West—Glanbrook, and approximately 712 election workers at 107 voting locations across the electoral district of Ottawa—Vanier.

For more information visit elections.on.ca or call 1-888-668-8683 (TTY: 1-888-292-2312).

Elections Ontario is the non-partisan agency responsible for administering provincial elections, by-elections and referenda.

http://www.theprovince.com/bus.....ilter=4007
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
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votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Mon Nov 14, 2016 5:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( for comparison only 2271 people voted in Ottawa west nepean by election in 2010 )


First estimate of advance poll turnout for the Ottawa West-Nepean by-election


TORONTO, March 1 /CNW/ - Six days of advance poll voting concluded last week for the March 4 by-election in the Electoral District of Ottawa West-Nepean. Preliminary numbers indicate that 2,271 electors cast their ballot at one of the 4 advance polls this past week.

The Election Act prescribes 13 days of advance poll voting for a fixed date general election, and six days for a by-election. In the 2007 General Election, 4,775 electors in the Electoral District of Ottawa West-Nepean chose to vote over 13 days of Advance Polls.

"The number of advance poll users suggests that the people of Ontario want a system that is flexible and responsive," said Greg Essensa, Ontario's Chief Electoral Officer. "Advance polls are a convenient option for the many Ontarians who wish to vote but are unable to do so on Election Day."

Election Day in the Electoral District of Ottawa West-Nepean is March 4. Polls are open from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. For more information call the local returning office at 1-866-532-3157.

Elections Ontario is the non-partisan agency responsible for administering provincial elections, by-elections and referenda.

Disponible en français

SOURCE Elections Ontario

http://www.newswire.ca/news-re.....75521.html
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
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Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Mon Nov 14, 2016 5:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( 7887 people voted in Ottawa south in 2013 but still far sort of the 10,000 in Ottawa vanier , either advance polls are way more popular now than in years past or something else is in play in these by elections )


First Estimate of Advance Voter Turnout for the Provincial By-Elections in Etobicoke—Lakeshore, London West, Ottawa South, Scarborough—Guildwood and Windsor—Tecumseh



TORONTO, July 29, 2013 /CNW/ - For the provincial by-elections in the Electoral Districts of Etobicoke—Lakeshore, London West, Ottawa South, Scarborough—Guildwood and Windsor—Tecumseh, voters were provided with several easy ways to cast their ballots in advance of election day, August 1, 2013. Advance voting opportunities included the option to vote by Special ballot by mail, in person at the local returning office or by home visit along with the choice to vote over seven days of advance polls.

As of July 29, preliminary figures indicated that the following numbers of electors have cast their ballots for the upcoming provincial by-elections:
• 6430 electors in the Electoral District of Etobicoke—Lakeshore,
• 7567 electors in the Electoral District of London West
• 7887 electors in the Electoral District of Ottawa South
• 2924 electors in the Electoral District of Scarborough—Guildwood
• 3460 electors in the Electoral District of Windsor—Tecumseh

Eligible electors can still vote in advance of election day at the local returning office by Special

ballot or by using Assistive Voting Technology until July 31 at 6 p.m.

Election day is on Thursday, August 1, where there will be approximately 3000 election workers at more than 354 voting locations across the five electoral districts. Eligible voters are encouraged to visit the Elections Ontario website to find out where, when and how to vote. More information is available at wemakevotingeasy.ca.

Elections Ontario is the non-partisan agency responsible for administering provincial elections, by-elections and referenda.

SOURCE: Elections Ontario

http://www.newswire.ca/news-re.....58521.html
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
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Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Mon Nov 14, 2016 5:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( there appears to have been an error in the first release I saw , it appears these are the actual numbers , either way still fairly high turnout for a by-election )

/U P D A T E -- Estimate of advance voter turnout for the Niagara West--Glanbrook and Ottawa--Vanier provincial by-elections/


TORONTO, Nov. 14, 2016 /CNW/ - As of Monday November 14, 2016, preliminary figures indicate that 4,569 voters cast their ballot at advance polls in the Niagara West—Glanbrook provincial by-election. In comparison, 7,170 voters cast their ballot at advance polls in Niagara West—Glanbrook in the 2014 General Election.

And as of Monday November 14, 2016, preliminary figures indicate that 4,824 voters cast their ballot at advance polls in the Ottawa—Vanier provincial by-election. In comparison, 5,113 voters cast their ballot at advance polls in Ottawa—Vanier in the 2014 General Election.

Advance polling took place between Saturday November 5, 2016 and Friday November 11, 2016. Voters also had the opportunity to vote in person by special ballot at the local returning office, by home visit, or by mail.

Election Day is on Thursday November 17, 2016. An estimated 101,767 eligible voters will be able to cast their ballot in the Niagara West—Glanbrook provincial by-election and an estimated 82,545 eligible voters will be able to cast their ballot in Ottawa—Vanier. Eligible voters are encouraged to visit elections.on.ca to find out where, when and how to vote.

There are nine candidates running to fill the seat as Member of Provincial Parliament for the electoral district of Niagara West—Glanbrook, and 11 candidates running in the electoral district of Ottawa—Vanier. A complete list of candidates is available at elections.on.ca.

There will be approximately 585 election workers at 64 voting locations across the electoral district of Niagara West—Glanbrook, and approximately 712 election workers at 107 voting locations across the electoral district of Ottawa—Vanier.

For more information visit elections.on.ca or call 1-888-668-8683 (TTY: 1-888-292-2312).

Elections Ontario is

http://www.newswire.ca/news-re.....44396.html
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
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Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Mon Nov 14, 2016 9:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( how does elections Ontario send out the wrong number of people who voted in a news release ? that makes no sense )



Strong advance poll numbers in Ottawa-Vanier (UPDATED)



12:51 PM


Advanced voting has been heavy in the riding of Ottawa-Vanier prior to Thursday's by-election at a rate only slightly lower than the previous province-wide vote.

Preliminary figures from Elections Ontario show 4,824 people cast their ballots in advance polls over seven days.

That compares to 5,113 advance votes in the 2014 general election.

There are an estimated 82,545 people eligible to vote in the by-election, called to replace longtime Liberal MPP and cabinet minister Madeleine Meilleur.

NOTE: An earlier version of this story said 10,694 advance votes had been cast. This was an incorrect number provided by Elections Ontario. A correction was sent out later in the day.

http://www.iheartradio.ca/580-.....-1.2185913
RCO





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Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Tue Nov 15, 2016 8:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Niagara West-Glanbrook by-election campaign

Posted: November 14, 2016 09:34:01 PM
Category: Niagara
Tags: by-election, Donna Cridland, Jeyan Jeganathan, Mike Thomas, niagara west-glanbrook, Sam Oosterhoff, Vicky Ringuette


Voters will hit the polls Thursday for the Niagara West-Glanbrook riding by-election. The riding represents over 120 000 voters, it was former Ontario PC leader Tim Hudak’s old riding. He stepped down two months ago. It’s been a Conservative riding ever since it was created in 2007 and now it is up for grabs. There are 9 candidates and voters say they’re looking for change.

19-year-old PC candidate Sam Oosterhoff was joined by party leader Patrick Brown this morning in Grimsby. The Brock university student shocked many when he beat out party president Rick Dykstra to represent the Tories. NDP candidate and former Hamilton police officer Mike Thomas says Hydro is the biggest issue. Green Party candidate Donna Cridland is a long-time bank manger and says Niagara’s beauty is also at risk. And Liberal candidate Vicky Ringuette was door knocking in Beamsville, she says having a voice in a majority party makes sense.

Elections Ontario released preliminary numbers from last week’s advance polls in the Niagara West-Glanbrook riding, just over 4500 people voted. That’s more than 2500 ballots short of the advance polls during the general election that took place two years ago.

http://www.chch.com/niagara-we.....-campaign/
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Nov 15, 2016 8:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Trumped out? Take a walk on the mild side in Ottawa-Vanier

If you're still recovering from last week's bitterly fought and frankly bizarre election south of the border, some antidote might be found in Ottawa's east end.


By: Steve Collins Metro Published on


If you're still recovering from last week's bitterly fought, frequently ugly and frankly bizarre electoral circus south of the border, some antidote might be found in Ottawa's east end Thursday.


If past experience here is any guide, Ottawa-Vanier by-election voters will line up for minutes, not hours, at polling stations where civility, fairness and order are the default settings. Voter suppression? What's that? Intimidation? Just not on.


The local campaign has been blessedly short on (though not completely free of) personal attacks and unsupported accusations. If it weren't for the ubiquitous campaign signs in the east end, you might not even be able to tell it's happening at all.


One factor in the lower temperature is, I don't doubt, the lower stakes. No matter what happens Thursday, this by-election, and a concurrent one in Niagara West-Glanbrook, won't shift the balance of power at Queen's Park.


The outcome in Ottawa-Vanier is probably not in much doubt, either. The Liberals have held this riding provincially for 45 years, and with only occasional interruption for much of the last hundred. Still, anything can happen, and the governing party, in these days of pollster-confounding upsets, has been taking no chances.


I myself received a recorded phone message from retired MPP Madeleine Meilleur, and a live call from a Liberal campaign volunteer (and dodged numerous other calls from the Grits and a persistent pollster).


Liberal Nathalie Des Rosiers' campaign also took the unfortunate step of sending an attack mail-out targeting (in both French and English) Progressive Conservative candidate Andre Marin, the former ombudsman for Ontario and the Canadian Forces.


“Who is the real Andre Marin?” it asks ominously, over an unflattering photo of Marin, mouth agape (and eyes reddened, I suspected, with a little help from Photoshop), a couple bowdlerized quotes from old newspaper stories and the completely unsupported conclusion: “Andre Marin only cares about Andre Marin. We deserve better.”


Voters deserve better than this sort of childish non-argument. It's cheap, not terribly convincing, even kind of embarrassing, but it's still miles above the dispiriting months-long mud-wrestle we just witnessed in the U.S.


When the opposition parties are more interested in fighting over Hydro bills than niqabs and other identity-politics fixations, it feels like a sign of relatively solid civic health.


One hot-button social issue in the last by-election campaign – the updated sex education curriculum – has since been shunted off to the side by PC leader Patrick Brown, who now backs it. The banner of opposition has taken up by the fringe candidate Elizabeth de Viel Caste of the single-issue, multi-syllabic Stop the New Sex-Ed Agenda Party.


Meanwhile, Mayor Jim Watson's survey questions for the major-party candidates, not surprisingly, all come down to funding, a re-re-re-commitment to the second phase of our LRT project (already explicitly supported by all three major parties in the last provincial election) plus early work on a downtown truck tunnel, which a recent report priced at $2-billion, and more cash for police and housing.


It's all very businesslike, practical, a little dull, even. A Donald Trump-free zone, with nastiness kept to a minimum, and, unlike last week, voters here can actually do something about the outcome. What's not to like?

http://www.metronews.ca/views/.....anier.html
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Nov 15, 2016 11:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Final Ottawa–Vanier byelection debate tonight ahead of Nov. 17 vote

4,824 voted in Ottawa–Vanier advance polls, according to preliminary Elections Ontario data

By Chloé Fedio, CBC News Posted: Nov 15, 2016 5:00 AM ET| Last Updated: Nov 15, 2016 5:00 AM ET

Four provincial candidates were invited to a debate in Ottawa-Vanier on Nov. 10: (from left to right) Progressive Conservative André Marin, NDP Claude Bisson, Liberal Nathalie Des Rosiers and Green Raphael Morin.


Diane Hamel has been a Liberal supporter since she moved to Ottawa–Vanier in 1984 but as the Nov. 17 provincial byelection approaches, she still hasn't decided who will get her vote — and it's the rising cost of hydro that's driving her indecision.

"That's why I didn't go for the early vote, because I'm still thinking what would be best for this ward," she said. "Reduce the rate of hydro. It's getting to be way too expensive."

After Liberal wins in 13 consecutive elections dating back to 1971, is there a sentiment for change in the ward?


Ontario Progressive Conservative leader Patrick Brown has been door-to-door with his party's candidate, André Marin, the province's former ombudsman, in an effort to galvanize uncertain voters to embrace change.

Premier Kathleen Wynne has also campaigned with Liberal candidate Nathalie Des Rosiers, the University of Ottawa's common law dean, in Ottawa.

Bright orange signs promoting NDP candidate Claude Bisson can be seen at intersections across the ward and are competing for space on front lawns with other candidates.

Elections Ontario said Monday that preliminary figures show 4,824 people voted in advance polls in Ottawa–Vanier, compared to 5,113 in the 2014 general election.

Voters will have a chance to hear from candidates at the final debate ahead of the byelection at Rockcliffe Park Public School at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday night.

Ottawa-Vanier election
Ottawa-Vanier hasn't elected a PC MPP since 1967. (Radio-Canada)

Door-to-door campaign

On a sunny Monday afternoon, Marin was knocking on doors on Glenhurst Crescent in the east edge of the riding.

"Did you go next door? There's another vote," a supporter called from her front porch after a visit from Marin. Two doors down, a Liberal sign displayed prominently on the front lawn supported the party that has deep roots in the riding.

Des Rosiers told CBC News she has heard much more than hydro concerns while door-knocking during the campaign, including health care, lack of child care, tuition, traffic issues and the need to revitalize Montreal Road.

"People share different solutions with us about what they would like to see in Ottawa–Vanier and elsewhere," she said. "I have heard so many ideas that I have in a big portfolio now to continue to create a good community for Ottawa–Vanier."

But Marin told CBC News he believes the riding "has been taken for granted" by the Liberals for decades, and that high hydro rates are part of a much larger local problem.

"Take a walk down Montreal Road then take a walk in Westboro. The contrast is obvious," he said, adding that the debate tonight is a chance to challenge Des Rosiers on a range of topics, including health care cuts, community safety and French-language rights.

"I will be putting the Liberal candidate's feet to the fire."


PCs win 2 byelections in 2016

​Both Ontario byelections so far this year have gone to the PCs.
■PCs take Scarborough–Rouge River from Liberals in byelection
■​PCs fend off Liberal challenge in Whitby–Oshawa byelection

In February, the PC candidate Lorne Coe held Whitby–Oshawa — previously held by Christine Elliott, who resigned from her seat after losing the leadership contest to Brown.

In September, PC candidate Raymond Cho took Scarborough–Rouge River, which had been Liberal since its inception in 1999.

The Nov. 17 byelection in Ottawa–Vanier coincides with the byelection in Niagara West–Glanbrook, prompted when former PC leader Tim Hudak vacated his seat in September.
■ANALYSIS | What Sam Oosterhoff's nomination means for PCs

Sam Oosterhoff, a 19-year-old university student, won the PC nomination for Niagara's wine country, beating Ontario PC party president and former St. Catharines MP Rick Dykstra.

11 candidates registered

The Ottawa–Vanier byelection has attracted 11 candidates, including a man who legally changed his name to Above Znoneofthe, so that his name could appear at the bottom of the ballot for the None of the Above Party.

Formerly known as Sheldon Bergson, the Thornhill, Ont., man initially spent $137 to legally change his name to run in the Feb. 11 Whitby–Oshawa byelection. He lost with just 140 votes.

The complete list of candidates in the Ottawa–Vanier byelection:
■Claude Bisson, New Democratic Party of Ontario.
■Kevin Clarke, The Peoples Political Party.
■Elizabeth de Viel Castel, Stop the New Sex-Ed Agenda.
■Nathalie Des Rosiers, Ontario Liberal Party.
■Dean T. Harris, Ontario Libertarian Party.
■André Marin, Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario.
■Stephanie McEvoy, Canadian Constituents' Party.
■David McGruer, Freedom Party of Ontario.
■Raphaël Morin, Green Party of Ontario.
■John Turmel, Pauper Party of Ontario.
■Above Znoneofthe, None of the Above Party.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/.....-1.3849801
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Nov 15, 2016 2:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

EDITORIAL: Byelections a good pulse check


Luke Edwards/Metroland

Candidates for the upcoming Niagara West-Glanbrook byelection discussed the issues Monday evening, at an all-candidates event hosted by the Lincoln Chamber of Commerce. From left: independent Martin Poos (in hat), NDPer Mike Thomas, Libertarian Stefanos Karatopis, Liberal Vicky Ringuette, progressive conservative Sam Oosterhoff, and None of the Above Party Greg Vezina. Speaking is Stop the New Sex-Ed Agenda’s Queenie Yu.

Grimsby Lincoln News

To the casual observer, you might question what is at stake with the Nov. 17 byelection.

Your vote has no real impact on the composition at Queen’s Park – which will remain a Liberal majority regardless of what happens in Niagara West-Glanbrook and Ottawa West-Vanier. The successful candidate will only hold office for less than two years before the province heads back to the polls. And the winner will ultimately have to decide come next election which riding they even run in given the redistribution of the boundaries to align with the federal ridings, meaning Niagara West-Glanbrook will be no more.

A recent Hamilton Spectator column even pointed out how little awareness there was in the Hamilton portions of the riding, despite there being thousands of eligible voters in that city. The whole boundary redistribution — electors in Glanbrook, for example are in the new riding of Flamborough-Glanbrook federally — only confuses the residents there, according to some community leaders.

But there certainly is a lot of interest in the political forum. There are nine candidates running locally here in Niagara West-Glanbrook, and national media has shone a spotlight on the byelection in this riding since 19-year-old social conservative Sam Oosterhoff won the Ontario PC nomination. Oosterhoff is up against Liberal Vicky Ringuette, NDP Mike Thomas, Green Party candidate Donna Cridland — who has been missing in action for any debates so far — independent Martin Poos, Ontario Libertarian Party candidate Stefanos Karatopis, Arthur Smitherman of the Canadian Constituent’s Party, Greg Vezina of the None of the Above Party and Queenie Yu — who has endorsed Oosterhoff — of the Stop the New Sex-Ed Agenda party.

Meanwhile in Ottawa-Vanier there are 11 candidates, including high-profile Progressive Conservative André Marin, vying for votes in a riding that has elected a Liberal in 13 straight elections dating back to 1971.

That’s because at the heart of this is a real pulse check for the Ontario Liberals. They already lost the Scarborough-Rouge River byelection earlier this year to the Ontario PCs, and now the results of the two byelections on Nov. 17 will give all parties an idea of what the electors are thinking. Coincidentally, the votes take place the day before Wynne’s embattled Liberals gather in Ottawa for a weekend convention to continue preparations for the next provincial election on June 7, 2018.

What was clear after Scarborough-Rouge River is that any Liberal-safe territory should not be taken for granted. Recent polls have already shown the Wynne government’s popularity is declining, and this week’s byelections are another pulse check with Ontario electors.

So take the time to vote Thursday if you haven’t already. Let the government know if you think they’re on the right track, or whether you support a new direction.

Send them a message. Cast your vote.

http://www.niagarathisweek.com.....lse-check/
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Nov 15, 2016 2:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Niagara West–Glanbrook voters head to polls Thursday


By Bill Sawchuk, St. Catharines Standard

Monday, November 14, 2016 6:32:29 EST PM


Everything is ready for Thursday’s byelection in Niagara West–Glanbrook, the riding’s returning officer says.

“The momentum is starting to pick up,” Robert Ciarlo said. “We are down to our last couple days and we are busy. I’m getting a sense that people are ready to vote.”

The riding was vacated when former Progressive Conservative Tim Hudak resigned last month.

There are nine candidates on the ballot including Sam Oosterhoff, Progressive Conservative; Vicky Ringuette, Liberal; and Mike Thomas, New Democratic Party. The ballot will also include Donna Cridland, Green Party of Ontario; Stefanos Karatopis, Ontario Libertarian Party; Martin Poos, independent; Arthur Smitherman, Canadian Constituents’ Party of Ontario; Greg Vezina, None of the Above Party; and Queenie Yu, Stop the New Sex-Ed Agenda.

“We knew there would be a byelection when Mr. Hudak announced his resignation in August, but we didn’t know when it would be called,” Ciarlo said. “They didn’t have to call one until March. We knew that there was a possibility that it would be at the same time as the other byelection in Ottawa–Vanier. We had our team head up to Toronto for training, and Elections Ontario prepared us extremely well.

“We have a terrific staff. They understand the task, and they work endless hours. I can’t say enough about them.”

Ciarlo said the pace is different in a byelection for the returning office than for a general election, the latter which has more lead time.

With tight byelection timelines, Ciarlo would still like to add workers to his roster.

“We hire almost 700 people, so there is always a demand,” Ciarlo said. “On the day, you know people will be sick. Others have commitments and have medical appointments they can’t miss, or their husband has a medical appointment and they can’t make it. You have to be ready.”

About 101,000 voters are eligible to cast ballots in the riding. Hudak won for the Progressive Conservatives with about 41 per cent of the vote the last time out. The turnout was about 59 per cent.

Advanced voting ended Friday, Ciarlo said. He estimated residents have cast about 10,000 early ballots. The ballots aren’t officially counted until election day.

“The advance poll turnout is as about as expected,” Ciarlo said. “In a byelection, the experts tell me the numbers are a little lower than in a general election.”

If a voter missed the advanced polls, he or she can still cast special a ballot at the returning office at 249 St. Catharines St. in Smithville until Wednesday.

The polls open at 9 a.m. Thursday and close at 9 p.m.

Thomas’s campaign manager, Norm MacAskill, said his candidate will be campaigning non-stop until Thursday.

“We are knocking on as many doors as he can over the last couple days and meeting as many voters has we can,” MacAskill said. “That’s the plan.”

Ringuette said her goal is to try to reach as many people face-to-face as possible.

“The most rewarding experience of this has been meeting people and getting a chance to talk with them,” Ringuette said. “We have been everywhere — West Lincoln, Pelham, Fonthill, Beamsville, Grimsby, Stoney Creek, Mount Hope.

“We’ve been very fortunate with the weather, so I can’t complain. It has been blue skies, no jackets required.”

The party leaders have also turned their attention to the riding. Progressive Conservative Leader Patrick Brown made a campaign stop Monday with Oosterhoff and Grimsby diner owner Tony Macri and discussed hydro rates. Brown also visited the riding during the first week of the campaign and when Oosterhoff officially opened his campaign office.

NDP Leader Andrea Horwath has campaigned with Thomas twice. They held a news conference at West Lincoln Memorial Hospital and pledged the NDP would fight to get the hospital rebuilt.

Saturday, Horwath and Thomas visited a number of local businesses across the riding to discuss issues.

Early in the campaign Premier Kathleen Wynne met Ringuette at her Binbrook home, and the Liberals made a number of meet-and-greet stops throughout the riding.

http://www.stcatharinesstandar.....s-thursday
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Nov 16, 2016 8:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Analysis
What you should (and shouldn't) watch for in Ontario byelections

PC candidates add spark to both of Thursday's contests, in Niagara West-Glanbrook and Ottawa-Vanier

By Mike Crawley, CBC News Posted: Nov 16, 2016 5:00 AM ET| Last Updated: Nov 16, 2016 7:51 AM ET

Sam Oosterhoff, 19, is the Progressive Conservative candidate in Thursday's byelection in Niagara West-Glanbrook, a riding represented since 1995 by former PC leader Tim Hudak, until he retired from politics this summer.


The two provincial byelections happening Thursday ought to be ho-hum affairs, since neither seat has changed hands in a generation or more. But the candidates running for the Progressive Conservatives sure are making things interesting.



In Niagara West-Glanbrook, a longtime PC stronghold, the party is fielding a 19-year-old pro-life university student named Sam Oosterhoff, who would become Ontario's youngest-ever MPP if he wins.

In Ottawa-Vanier, a seat the Liberals consider one of their safest in the province, the PC candidate is André Marin, the high-profile, outspoken former provincial ombudsman.


The results in both ridings will be worth watching, because they could gauge the depth of voter frustration with Premier Kathleen Wynne's government, and with their rising hydro bills.

At all-candidates' debates and in door-to-door canvassing, voters are complaining about the high price of electricity. Wynne knows it makes her party vulnerable: her own polling shows 94 per cent of Ontarians rank reining in hydro prices as important.

"The way that plays in a particular byelection or not, is up to the people in those ridings," Wynne told a news conference Tuesday in Toronto. "We realize that the cost of electricity has burdened people across the province and we're working to help with that."

The results on Thursday could provide evidence of whether that "help" — her $1-billion-a-year move to rebate the eight per cent provincial portion of the HST on hydro bills, starting January 1 — is enough to satisfy voters.

Ottawa-Vanier 'a Liberal fortress'

Ottawa-Vanier has gone Liberal for 13 straight elections. Most recently, in 2014, Madeleine Meilleur won with a margin of 13,000 votes, one of the most comfortable Liberal victories in the province. If the party can't hold on to this seat, there will be some serious angst in Wynneland.

Taking such a Liberal stronghold would be an absolute triumph for Patrick Brown. It would even outstrip the significance of former Toronto city councillor Raymond Cho winning the September byelection in Scarborough-Rouge River, another long-held Liberal seat.

"If there is a Liberal fortress, this is it," Brown said Tuesday.

Ottawa Vanier candidates debate
Four of the candidates in the Ottawa-Vanier byelection are (from left) Progressive Conservative André Marin, New Democrat Claude Bisson, Liberal Nathalie Des Rosiers and Green Raphael Morin. (Angie Bonefant/Radio-Canada)

"This should not be in play. This should not be competitive," the PC leader told me in an interview at Queen's Park. "I can tell you the[response from voters at the]doors are encouraging. I think this may be a long night, it may be competitive."

For now, Brown is positioning himself to claim a moral victory should the PCs even come close in Ottawa-Vanier. He argues that a Liberal win of less than 10 percentage points — about 4,000 votes — would raise questions about Ontarians' confidence in Wynne.

The Liberal candidate in the riding is law school dean Nathalie Des Rosiers, while the NDP's is former RCMP executive Claude Bisson. There are eight other names on the ballot.

Niagara West-Glanbrook's 19-year-old PC candidate

Tim Hudak first won election in Niagara West-Glanbrook for the PCs in 1995. Sam Oosterhoff, the PC candidate aiming to succeed him, wasn't even born then.

The 19-year-old has never voted in a provincial election, and now he's running in one. He lives with his parents. Should he win, he'll represent the biggest wine-growing area in Ontario, and he's barely old enough to drink.

"Long story short, I've just seen the damage the Liberals are doing to families and job creators here in the riding and I decided to get involved," Oosterhoff said in an interview last week.

Candidates
The NDP's Mike Thomas, left, and Vicky Ringuette of the Liberals are also running in Niagara WEst-Glanbrook byelection. (Radio-Canada)

Oosterhoff is strongly anti-abortion but says that "doesn't come up much" when he meets voters. However, he says he is hearing "a lot of concerns from parents" about the province's sex-ed curriculum.

"We need to make sure that we have a curriculum that recognizes the importance of parents in that discussion and we need to make sure we have a curriculum that is crafted in consultation with parents," Oosterhoff said.

He counters that sex-ed is not the dominant issue in the vote.

"This byelection is about making sure that we're focusing on getting the cost of living under control for people here in the riding," said Oosterhoff, "focusing on jobs here in the riding, focusing on health care here in the riding, getting hydro rates under control."


This part of the province has not sent a Liberal to Queen's Park in nearly 30 years. The realists in Wynne's party are hoping for a respectable showing against the youngster, and not to end up third.

The Liberal candidate is family lawyer Vicky RInguette, the NDP's is former Hamilton police officer Mike Thomas. There are six others on the ballot.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/.....-1.3851575
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 16, 2016 9:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wynne tries to distract from real issues plaguing Ontario


christina-blizzard
By Christina Blizzard, Queen's Park Columnist
First posted: Tuesday, November 15, 2016 06:12 PM EST | Updated: Wednesday, November 16, 2016 07:23 AM EST



The outcome of Thursday’s two provincial byelections will change nothing — and everything.

They could signal a major seismic shift in the political landscape.

The standings in the Ontario legislature now are: Libs 57, PC 28, and NDP 20 — with two seats vacant.

Even if the opposition parties win the two seats up for grabs — Ottawa-Vanier and Niagara West-Glanbrook, when the sun comes up on Friday, Kathleen Wynne will still be the premier of the province with a comfortable majority government.

But voters in those two ridings can send this dreadful government a strong message they can’t ignore: Enough of the waste, mismanagement and arrogance.

The Liberals — and Wynne herself — have been attempting to distract from the real issues plaguing this province by trying to cast the election in Niagara West-Glanbrook as an indictment of the Tories’ 19-year-old candidate, Sam Oosterhoff.

When pressed by reporters Tuesday, Wynne wouldn’t criticize Oosterhoff directly on of his socially conservative views.

But she came close.

“To the extent that there are people in our society, whether they’re candidates or not, who believe that taking us back in time, believe in undermining work that has been done for decades to ensure the rights of women, to ensure that kids have access to information they need to keep them safe in terms of the sex-ed curriculum, to re-litigate battles, the decisions of which have kept people safe for years, that disturbs me,” Wynne told reporters.

Look, Oosterhoff was nominated democratically by his party. He has made his views clear. If he’s elected by voters in his Niagara riding, which seems highly likely, it will be because a lot of people in that riding share his views.

Like it or lump it, that’s what democracy’s about.

This chatter about social conservatism is just a distraction. Abortion and same-sex marriage aren’t provincial issues, and they’ve been decided. Oosterhoff will have to toe Tory Leader Patrick Brown’s line on the sex-ed curriculum because votes are whipped along party lines at Queen’s Park.

The chatter about sex-ed is just Liberal noise to cover their mistakes.

The Liberal candidate, Vicky Ringuette, was jeered on hydro prices at a recent all-candidates’ debate. The Liberals have foisted their devastating Green Energy Act on unwilling and unsuspecting residents of rural Ontario. And we’re all paying the price.

Meanwhile, Brown is busily nominating candidates and gaining momentum.

At his GTA leader’s dinner in Vaughan on Wednesday, he’ll be introduced by Caroline Mulroney Lapham. While she’s told me categorically she’s not running for Brown, having such a high-profile member of a highly respected Conservative family introduce him is a huge coup and adds gravitas to his campaign.

Wynne and her party may be trying to distract voters with their chatter about the sex-ed curriculum.

Voters aren’t fooled. They know the Liberal litany of waste, mismanagement and scandal. They’re sickened by bribery charges in Sudbury. They’re impoverished by high taxes, and soaring hydro costs.

Niagara West-Glanbrook was Tory and is likely to stay that way.

They could send a strong message — the NDP could come second. Ottawa-Vanier was Liberal. Voters should do us all a favour and kick them out.

We’re mad as hell — and we’re not going to take it anymore.

Please.

http://www.torontosun.com/2016.....ng-ontario
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 16, 2016 10:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ontario PCs hoping to unseat Liberals in two byelections Thursday


Allison Jones and Keith Leslie, The Canadian Press
Published Wednesday, November 16, 2016 10:11AM EST
Last Updated Wednesday, November 16, 2016 10:48AM EST


TORONTO -- Ontario's Progressive Conservatives hope to make history Thursday in two byelections, with a teenage candidate in the Niagara area and a former provincial ombudsman trying to take an Ottawa seat from the Liberals.

The Tories are expected to hold Niagara West-Glanbrook even with an upstart 19-year-old candidate stirring up controversy by taking social conservative stances that run contrary to PC leader Patrick Brown's attempts at modernizing the party.

But the Tories are also taking a hard run at Ottawa-Vanier, which has elected only Liberals since 1971.


Patrick Brown
Ontario PC Leader Patrick Brown is pictured in a file photo from Thursday, September 1, 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Former ombudsman Andre Marin is running under the PC banner there and is trying to capitalize on anger over rising electricity rates and the declining popularity of Premier Kathleen Wynne.

When he mentions Wynne's name while campaigning, people "bristle," Marin said. "They have a physical reaction."

The Liberal candidate, civil liberties lawyer Nathalie Des Rosiers, acknowledged that hydro prices are a hurdle for her in the campaign.

"It's normal at mid-mandate that one issue becomes a catalyst for disappointment on a variety of points of view, so in a byelection that usually is the case -- there's one issue that becomes the symbol of discontent," she said.

The Liberal government announced an eight-per-cent rebate on electricity bills will come into effect Jan. 1, but it remains to be seen whether it is enough to satisfy the 94 per cent of Ontarians that government-commissioned polling shows are eager for hydro price relief.

The Liberal candidate in Niagara West-Glanbrook, Vicki Ringuette, was booed and jeered at a recent all candidates meeting when she talked about the rebate.

"It is not the kind of reaction I'm getting at the doors," said Ringuette. "They want to talk about the issues that are important to this community, health care, schools, the fact that we're getting increased day care spaces."

But PC candidate Sam Oosterhoff -- who would be the youngest person elected to the legislature -- said rising electricity bills and anger over the installation of giant wind turbines in the riding are the top issues people bring up with him.

"People are upset and are worried about the direction the Liberals are taking Ontario," he said. "People want a voice of change and I'm excited to be that voice."

Oosterhoff, who describes himself as "100 per cent pro life," said he agrees that Ontario's sex-education curriculum needed to be updated, but he wouldn't say if he'd work to repeal the changes if the Tories win the 2018 election.

"I think we need to ensure that we have a curriculum that was crafted in consultation with parents, and the Liberals have done a really bad job on that," he said.

Oosterhoff, who beat out PC party president Rick Dykstra and a party vice-president to win the nomination, also refused to say where he stands on same-sex marriage, insisting it's not an issue in the byelection.

The teenage candidate believes he can vote against his party's positions in the legislature.

"I'm very proud of the PC party having a long-standing tradition of allowing open votes on matters of deeply held conscience," he said.

The Liberals claim Oosterhoff started "sanitizing" his Twitter account to delete posts about his social conservative views, while some Conservatives accused Brown's office of "muzzling" their candidate.

In Ottawa-Vanier, the Liberals took a screen capture of a now-deleted tweet showing Marin's campaign manager holding a pro-Trump sign, and planned to use it to say the Tories' values are not in line with the community's.

Marin said he doesn't perform "mind control" on his staff, who are free to do what they want.

"Listen, I'm just about as far from a Trump supporter as you could possibly imagine," Marin said.

"(The Liberals) should look at themselves in the mirror and say, 'You know, we're a lot like Trump' because in many ways he won the election by being a slimy, sleazy smearer and Nathalie Des Rosiers should think twice before she embarks on that course of action."

The NDP candidate in Ottawa-Vanier is Claude Bisson, brother of the party's house leader in the legislature, Gilles Bisson. The New Democrat running in Niagara is former Hamilton police officer Mike Thomas, who signed a five-year membership in the Ontario PC party in September.

http://www.cp24.com/news/ontar.....-1.3163172
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 16, 2016 1:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Over the last few days as I have read many of the articles pertaining to tomorrows By-Elections the pictures that seems to be painted is an expectation that the PCs will win both ridings.

The bar for the Liberals has been set incredibly low;
Should they retain Ottawa-Vanier which by all rights they should that isn't a "win" for the OLP its maintaining the riding with the highest number of Government Employees in the country which they have safely held for decades.

The PCs secured 8,750 votes in this riding in the last election and lost it by 30%.
If they secure a similar amount of votes and still lose the riding by 2 or 3% that is a massive win for the PCs in a riding that doesn't even get discussed in the equation of ridings that would need to go PC for them to form a government.

For the Liberals to lose this riding or even for the PCs to come within a single digit percentage within it would be catastrophic.

This isn't Scarborough—Rouge River which at least is bordered by ridings that have gone PC in recent memory, Ottawa Vanier is a stronghold surrounded by strongholds in a region that voted OLP even during the PC majority era.
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 16, 2016 4:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Politics, and not a side-show, dominate final Ottawa–Vanier MPP byelection debate

Debate organizers hire security guards to prevent uninvited candidates from stealing the show

By Stu Mills, CBC News Posted: Nov 16, 2016 6:25 AM ET| Last Updated: Nov 16, 2016 6:25 AM ET

A total of 11 candidates are vying to replace Madeleine Meilleur as MPP for Ottawa-Vanier and four of them squared off at a final debate on Tuesday night.


It was politics, and not a side show, that dominated the seventh and final Ottawa–Vanier byelection debate on Tuesday night.

Organizers were keen not to repeat what happened last week in Vanier when two uninvited candidates from fringe parties interrupted the debate and were eventually led out by police.

The event was organized by the Rockcliffe Park Residents Association, Lindenlea Community Association and Manor Park Manor Community Association. Two private security guards were hired to monitor the door for unwanted disturbances.

"We didn't want to have any difficulties so we asked the police to come, and they won't come," said organizer Marilyn Venner.

"So, we hired the security firm."

Audience
About 250 people attended the debate at Rockcliffe Park Public School. (Stu Mills/CBC)

Debate attracted about 250 people

Sébastien Larochelle-Côté moderated. Organizers invited candidates from parties with a history of getting at least five per cent of the vote to answer questions posed by the crowd of about 250 people at Rockcliffe Park Public School.

Progressive Conservative Andre Marin, Liberal Nathalie Des Rosiers, New Democrat Claude Bisson and Green Raphael Morin took turns discussing the proposed closure of Rideau High School, the effect of combined sewage storage tunnel construction in Stanley Park, a downtown truck tunnel, the Energy East pipeline and hydro rates.



Listen to a panel of voters discuss the byelection here.


Marin was frequently on the attack, criticizing the Liberals for what he called a legacy of misspsending and for what he said was a confusing and puritan approach to beer and wine sales.

"You can buy wine at a certain place, but not another, depending on the time. Certain aisles will serve you, other aisles won't. It's so complicated," he said.

"Could you imagine if you came from outer space into Ontario and you wanted to buy a bottle of beer? Where would you go?"

Kathy Southee
Resident Kathy Southee (in the white sweater) says she's determined not to waste the power of her vote after the U.S. presidential election. (Stu Mills/CBC)

'Dismal as a campaign'

Resident Kathy Southee said she came to the debate determined not to squander the power of her vote.

"The example south of the border is so terrifying," she said.

But Christopher Adam said that even with 11 names on the ballot, the choices are poor and the debate throughout the campaign overly narrow.

"Frankly, as an average voter, it's been dismal as a campaign," he said.

"If an entire election is based upon hydro costs, that is one issue. But the reality is, is that the issue that's really touching the largest number of residents? I'm not so sure about that."

None of the Above
Thornhill, Ont., resident Sheldon Bergson, who spent $137 to legally change his name to Above Znoneofthe, tried to enter the debate hall but was refused. (Stu Mills/CBC)

Ottawa–Vanier currently without MP, MPP

As he had at the Vanier debate the week before, the man who legally changed his name to Above Znoneofthe tried to disrupt the event. He was refused entry by security guards.

The riding of Ottawa–Vanier is currently without an MP and an MPP.



Madeleine Meilleur, a longtime Liberal MPP and attorney general, resigned in June ahead of a cabinet reshuffle.

In August Ottawa–Vanier residents lost their longtime Liberal MP Mauril Bélanger when he died following a 10-month battle with ALS, also known as Lou Gherig's disease.

Bélanger had won seven consecutive elections after his initial win in a 1995 byelection.


http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/.....-1.3847081
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2 Ontario provincial by-elections taking place on Nov 17

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