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Progressive Tory





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PostPosted: Sat Oct 01, 2016 6:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
Its a great idea;
Candidates get maybe a few weeks before the writ to actually campaign in the riding they are running in.

Giving them a few years is good.


I disagree. While I agree that it's good for candidates to get more time meeting voters I think opening races so soon limits your pool of candidates, particularly those with higher profiles.

I worked on a campaign for someone who struggled with a lack of name recognition and had they been on the campaign trail longer they would have done much better. However, due to the job they were in they could only campaign once they took a leave of absence from work.

The Liberals opened nominations over a year before the last election in Newfoundland and Labrador. At the time there was some confusion as to when the election would be so they wanted to be ready. However, I had someone high profile criticize the move and they pointed out that if they wanted to run for office there was no way they could come out a year in advance. And due the job they're in they wouldn't even be able to approach a party and let them know due to likely rumours.

So while I do agree that candidates having time to campaign is a good thing I think it limits the pool of candidates. Not sure how true it is but I've heard the Liberals provincially would have had some stronger people run had they left some districts till later. While they had a big lead in the polls for two years prior to the elections it was inevitable in the weeks and months leading up to the campaign that they had it in the bag for sure. The party struggled to get strong candidates and it has really been showing showing now that they're in government.

My final point (and then I'll shut up) is that party's need to find a balance. In districts that you know will be tough due to either a strong incumbent or just historic trends it would be good to nominate someone early, it's unlikely a high profile candidate would want one of those districts. In areas that are either stronger districts for the party or ones that the party should be able to win if all goes well then they should try and hold off and work to get big names closer to the campaign.
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
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Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Sat Oct 01, 2016 9:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
Its a great idea;
Candidates get maybe a few weeks before the writ to actually campaign in the riding they are running in.

Giving them a few years is good.


maybe its a sign of better prepared for the next election , I felt in 2014 the ont pc's seemed oddly unprepared and not ready for that election even though they had a couple years to get ready after 2011 . in terms of policy , campaign ads , literature etc .I wouldn't necessary say they had poor candidates they just weren't ready for the election and amount of hostility unleashed on them by the unions and liberals. there wasn't a strong plan as to what they were campaigning on or how to get that message across especially to swing voters .

so maybe this is a sign Brown plans to be much better prepared , if you look thru the list of these ridings many of them are seats that were pc in the past and would need to win back to have any chance of returning to government . they can't allow the liberals to hold seats like Milton and Burlington if they hope to remove them from power .

the only odd riding on the list is Sault Ste Marie , its been a riding the ont pc's have done poorly in and not held recently ( although the federal cpc won it in 2011 ), its been mostly ndp or liberal , it also has a very personally popular liberal mpp who even with wynne's unpopularity would be hard to beat . I'm not sure I see this riding being a likely pc pick up at this time although anything is possible I guess .

( I looked at the Wikipedia page for riding pc vote seems to have crashed since 2003 for some reason in this riding , actually got 28% in 99 election but barely 10% since , not sure how they did in 95 can't see the results )
Bugs





Joined: 16 Dec 2009
Posts: 4395
Reputation: 245.8
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 01, 2016 4:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Progressive Tory wrote:
cosmostein wrote:
Its a great idea;
Candidates get maybe a few weeks before the writ to actually campaign in the riding they are running in.

Giving them a few years is good.


I disagree. While I agree that it's good for candidates to get more time meeting voters I think opening races so soon limits your pool of candidates, particularly those with higher profiles.

I worked on a campaign for someone who struggled with a lack of name recognition and had they been on the campaign trail longer they would have done much better. However, due to the job they were in they could only campaign once they took a leave of absence from work.

The Liberals opened nominations over a year before the last election in Newfoundland and Labrador. At the time there was some confusion as to when the election would be so they wanted to be ready. However, I had someone high profile criticize the move and they pointed out that if they wanted to run for office there was no way they could come out a year in advance. And due the job they're in they wouldn't even be able to approach a party and let them know due to likely rumours.

So while I do agree that candidates having time to campaign is a good thing I think it limits the pool of candidates. Not sure how true it is but I've heard the Liberals provincially would have had some stronger people run had they left some districts till later. While they had a big lead in the polls for two years prior to the elections it was inevitable in the weeks and months leading up to the campaign that they had it in the bag for sure. The party struggled to get strong candidates and it has really been showing showing now that they're in government.

My final point (and then I'll shut up) is that party's need to find a balance. In districts that you know will be tough due to either a strong incumbent or just historic trends it would be good to nominate someone early, it's unlikely a high profile candidate would want one of those districts. In areas that are either stronger districts for the party or ones that the party should be able to win if all goes well then they should try and hold off and work to get big names closer to the campaign.


Your point about reducing the pool of candidates is interesting. Of course, you might expect the more onerous the burden of campaigning, the fewer people would be interested. But a lot of the people vying for the nomination want the job for a combination of egotistic and idealistic reasons. For most people, a few years in politics will improve their lives, no matter what.

In a way, such candidates shouldn't expect to be elected if they put in a 40 hour week at their job, and only campaign after work.

Probably one of the biggest difficulties new candidates have is in getting a 'public profile' big enough to attract vote on their own. I think a party looks for such people, and people in occupations like broadcasting have an advantage for that reason.

I am not sure of what kind of 'campaigning' Cosmo has in mind, but I imagine it involves meeting community groups, little talks about what they want from government, and so forth Just spending time with people in the community. The focus should be on organizing volunteers, perhaps, and putting out the feeling of quiet, growing energy. This isn't something I know a lot about, but what's wrong with a little bar-b-que, at least a hot dog and a pop, and some entertainment. Meet the people stuff.

How many times do people have to see a political ad for it to have the impact of one face-to-face meeting? Even better if there's a little conversation and a shared laugh.

This time could be used effectively by meeting as many community groups as possible, just to listen and to introduce the candidate. Face-to-face interactions -- repeated -- are one of the best forms of advertising.
RCO





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votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Mon Oct 03, 2016 10:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( looks like there are some higher profile candidates than in years past as some previous mp's like Paul Calandra are interested in running )


Sep 29, 2016 | Vote 0 0

Former MP Paul Calandra seeks Ontario PC nomination for Markham-Stouffville



Stouffville Sun-Tribune
By Ali Raza


Former federal MP and Stouffville resident Paul Calandra will seek the nomination to run for Member of Provincial Parliament for the Ontario Progressive Conservative Party in the next provincial election, set for 2018.

The next nomination meeting is tentatively scheduled for May/June 2017. Members of the Ontario PC Party in the provincial riding of Markham-Stouffville will have the chance to nominate Calandra then.

Having served seven years as federal MP in Ottawa representing the former riding of Oak Ridges-Markham, Calandra believes his experience and connections will allow him to “hit the ground running” should he win the nomination.

“Seeing what’s happening in the province, I think there are a lot of issues I want to tackle,” Calandra said. “Now’s the time we have to get things done and balance the budget, cut taxes, bring back open opportunity for people.”

Calandra says he’s good friends with current Ontario PC leader Patrick Brown. He believes the province remains strong despite what he’s seen through his business consulting.

“It’s almost like people are giving up,” Calandra said. “We’ve got so many resources, so much opportunity to succeed; we gotta unleash the potential and stop killing it with policies.”

Stouffville supporters of the Ontario PC Party have until spring 2017 to become members to nominate their candidate.

“We’ve got a long way to go to build that membership base,” Calandra added.

Stouffville resident and pharmacist Farid Wassef is also seeking the nomination for the Ontario PC Party, according to his website http://www.wassef.ca

A longtime resident of the town, Wassef unsuccessfully ran for MPP under the PC banner in 2014 and 2011. Both times Wassef was defeated by current Liberal MPP Helena Jaczek, being 6,000 votes short in the last election from winning.

Wassef and his family moved to Canada in 1968 from Egypt. He has served the community as a pharmacist for the last 30 years.

Wassef was not available for comment.

http://www.yorkregion.com/news.....ouffville/
RCO





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Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Mon Oct 03, 2016 10:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( it also appears former mp daryl kramp may run in Hastings lennox and addington provincially , the same riding he narrowly lost last year federally )


September 30th, 2016 by Nicole Kleinsteuber
Kramp to make official announcement Monday



Daryl Kramp.
Daryl Kramp.

Daryl Kramp says he will be making a public announcement next week as to his intentions for the next provincial election.

In a Facebook post Friday night, the former Prince Edward Hastings MP thanked his supporters for encouraging him to seek the nomination as a candidate for the PC party of Ontario for the riding of Hastings Lennox & Addington.

In his Facebook post he wrote, “Like so many, I am deeply concerned about our province. The cost of energy has skyrocketed, driving business out of the province and overwhelming ordinary families with outrageous and unsustainable household bills. Deficits have ballooned and services have deteriorated. I am not prepared to sit by the sidelines and accept the status quo of a failed Liberal government. I have lifetime roots in the riding and a proven track record of delivering results. With your help, we can make a better Ontario.”

Kramp respectfully declined to comment any further but said everything will be revealed and he’ll gladly speak with the media following the announcement, set for Monday at the Madoc Arts Centre from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.

http://www.quintenews.com/2016.....ay/128286/
Progressive Tory





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PostPosted: Mon Oct 03, 2016 10:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Paul Calandra? :shock:
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Mon Oct 03, 2016 10:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Progressive Tory wrote:

I disagree. While I agree that it's good for candidates to get more time meeting voters I think opening races so soon limits your pool of candidates, particularly those with higher profiles.

I worked on a campaign for someone who struggled with a lack of name recognition and had they been on the campaign trail longer they would have done much better. However, due to the job they were in they could only campaign once they took a leave of absence from work.


My logic is almost entirely common sense revolution based;
Mike Harris had candidates in winnable ridings in place early and during his tour back and forth across the Province years before the election with his platform was able to campaign directly with the Candidate that would be running.

He was able to use his personal "brand" to introduce his candidate during his very publicized all ridings tour.

As for limiting the pool;
I hadn't thought of that, but at the same time you have a wealth of former CPC MPs that could be worth locking down early.

Progressive Tory wrote:


My final point (and then I'll shut up) is that party's need to find a balance. In districts that you know will be tough due to either a strong incumbent or just historic trends it would be good to nominate someone early, it's unlikely a high profile candidate would want one of those districts. In areas that are either stronger districts for the party or ones that the party should be able to win if all goes well then they should try and hold off and work to get big names closer to the campaign.


I don't think nominating every candidate in the next three months is prudent;
However for 905 ridings and the perimeter 416 ridings getting people in place early wouldn't be a bad idea.
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Mon Oct 03, 2016 10:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:

I am not sure of what kind of 'campaigning' Cosmo has in mind, but I imagine it involves meeting community groups, little talks about what they want from government, and so forth Just spending time with people in the community. The focus should be on organizing volunteers, perhaps, and putting out the feeling of quiet, growing energy. This isn't something I know a lot about, but what's wrong with a little bar-b-que, at least a hot dog and a pop, and some entertainment. Meet the people stuff.

How many times do people have to see a political ad for it to have the impact of one face-to-face meeting? Even better if there's a little conversation and a shared laugh.

This time could be used effectively by meeting as many community groups as possible, just to listen and to introduce the candidate. Face-to-face interactions -- repeated -- are one of the best forms of advertising.


The meet the people stuff is exactly what I mean;
The weekend festivals, the cultural events, whatever gets the person running in touch with the people of the community.

The mistake the PCs have made is their platform at times tends to be a little too ivory tower and not enough grass roots input.

What is the single biggest issue to the voters in Northumberland—Quinte West? or Oshawa? or Ancaster—Dundas—Flamborough—Westdale? Burlington? Halton? Etc

Patrick Brown has done an amazing job seemingly being everywhere, but he can only spend a finite amount of time in each riding and needs folks in the ground to be able to pass along the issues that are critical to those voters.
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Oct 03, 2016 11:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Progressive Tory wrote:
Paul Calandra? :shock:



I don't know if this was a total surprise , I believe he had some connections to provincial politics as well .
some of these provincial ridings may be more appealing to a former mp's cause there is no liberal incumbent in many of them ( as many new ridings were created in 905) and wynne government is much less popular in Ontario than federal liberals under trudeau . so a provincial run makes sense .

Hastings lennox and addington as an example it barely voted for trudeau by maybe 100 or so votes but provincially I doubt wynne would have any chance there , her base is very urban 416 area of Toronto and that riding would be very challenging for an Ontario liberal candidate rate now . its a highly likely Ontario pc riding as things stand rate now
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Oct 04, 2016 2:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Daryl Kramp to seek provincial nomination



By Jason Miller, The Intelligencer

Monday, October 3, 2016 8:00:03 EDT PM



Former Prince Edward-Hastings federal MP Daryl Kramp is officially vying for the provincial nomination to be the Progressive Conservative candidate for Hastings Lennox and Addington in 2018.



Kramp formally threw his hat into the PC nomination contest for the riding situated north of Highway 401 during a gathering in Madoc Monday night.

“I really gave some serious thought to this,” Kramp said. “I certainly feel that I can make a contribution.”

Kramp’s decision to return to politics was cemented after he attended a recent local roundtable where one of the primary topics of discussion was skyrocketing Ontario hydro rates.

“When I saw the impact on business, it’s deeply concerning to me,” Kramp said, adding he heard similar stories from droves of people at the recent plowing match about how rising rates was sucking financial resources from other aspects of their daily life. “The stories I was hearing were heartbreaking. How did we ever get into such a terrible state of mismanagement on this file?

People were calling the house here continuously, saying ‘Daryl, can you give us a hand with this?’,” Kramp said. “I just can’t sit on the sidelines.”

Kramp, who lost his seat to now MP Mike Bossio in the 2015 election, has to toss his name in the nomination bucket in the bid for backing from the local Progressive Conservative party membership.

“At some point I’m going to have to come to a solid decision,” said Kramp, who spent 11 years serving what was Prince Edward-Hastings as a federal member of parliament, before being unseated.

He’s garnered the blessing of party leader MPP Patrick Brown, who himself was a federal MP, at one time.

“I’ve had communication with the leader, “ Kramp said of Brown. “He’s been very comfortable with me as I’ve been comfortable with him.”

Kramp said he wouldn’t have put a solid foot forward “if the leader wasn’t comfortable with me.”

“You have to have your own convictions and beliefs, but you still have to work in an environment where there is a lot of collaboration going forward,” Kramp said.

Much of that comes down to being certain the access and understanding can be established, Kramp said.

Kramp isn’t getting ahead of himself in terms of him entering the nomination as a favourite driven by his established name as a former federal MP.

“I’ve been in a number of elections and I’ve been on both sides of the equations,” he said. “I’ve been extremely excited and I’ve been disappointed as well. I never prejudge anything at all. Times and things change so quickly.”

Back in July, the local party formed executive boards for both new ridings with MPP Todd Smith opting to run in the newly formed Bay of Quinte riding.

http://www.thepeterboroughexam.....nomination
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Oct 04, 2016 6:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( in another sign of desperation wynne is attempting to buy off teachers unions rate before the election with a contract extension )

Globe editorial

Wynne government puts its own interests first with union contract extensions


The Globe and Mail


Published Tuesday, Oct. 04, 2016 5:26PM EDT

Last updated Tuesday, Oct. 04, 2016 5:29PM EDT


The long-reigning Ontario Liberal Party has never had a close personal relationship with the emotion the rest of us know as shame. From the ignominious prorogue-enabled departure of former premier Dalton McGuinty in 2013 to Premier Kathleen Wynne’s about-face on political party finance rules this year, the Liberals have consistently proved that they cannot feel embarrassment.

And now they’ve done it again. Faced with three by-election losses in a row, and with Premier Wynne’s tanking approval ratings, the government is conspiring to buy labour peace through the next election campaign by offering unprecedented contract extensions to Ontario’s teachers’ unions.

All the contracts, so hard-won in 2012, are set to expire on Aug. 31, 2017. That means the government could be in negotiations with the unions leading into the general election expected the following spring. No politician campaigning for re-election wants to have teachers off the job, so Education Minister Mitzie Hunter has been reaching out to the unions about the possibility of extending their existing contracts beyond the election date.



This has been done without consulting the school boards, which are technically the bodies that negotiate with the unions. It would also require an amendment to the existing legislation on collective bargaining by school boards, because the law doesn’t allow for contract extensions.

The Wynne government has meanwhile been sending the explicit message that, should it subsequently win re-election in 2018, it will be generous when the next round of bargaining comes up.

All of this is compounded by the affectionate relationship between the Liberal Party and the teachers’ unions, which as a group have spent millions during elections campaigns to keep the Liberals in power, and which in return have received millions of dollars from the Wynne government to help cover such things as their contract negotiating costs.

This is deadpan political opportunism at its most naked. The Liberals are preparing the ground for an election that, should it go their way, will see them through their second uninterrupted decade in power. They are not about to let the obligation to act in the taxpayers’ best interests get in the way of that.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com.....e32249292/
Bugs





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PostPosted: Tue Oct 04, 2016 7:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Announcing something like this seems to me to be like inviting everybody in town to an all-you-can-eat at the Lobster Bar.

If you are negotiating for the teachers, what do you take from this? That there's going to be another big payday, no?

I say "another" because this is how they beat Ernie Eves in the first place. They cut deals with the civil servant unions. In big cities, you could see teachers campaigning with their kids as if they're hostages. On busy street corners, holding signs, as people enter subway stations. They act as if there are 'education issues'. Like real report cards, and the evaluation of each school being published. That's what they hated.

This is why some countries won't let civil servants have unions, or run for office.

Let's be sure to see what the settlements are, relative to what they are in similar other provinces. Then TC can come and tell us that they all do, so we're just a bunch of squares for getting upset.
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Oct 05, 2016 9:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( a race for the pc nomination in Hastings Lennox and addington )

NEWS

McGibbon seeks PC nomination




Tuesday, October 4, 2016 10:09:35 EDT AM


Municipal councillor, wife and mother of two, Tracy McGibbon has announced she is seeking the 2018 nomination for the Ontario PC Party in the riding of Hastings, Lennox and Addington.
“The province needs a new generation of leadership and that’s what Patrick Brown’s PC Party is offering,” McGibbon stated in a release. “We need a break from this old, tired Liberal government. Its time to revive Ontario.”
In addition to her municipal government experience, McGibbon is a dedicated community member sitting on several municipal and area boards and committees. She currently serves as chairperson of the North Hastings Family Health Team board of directors and has recently been selected as one of the advisors for the PC Party on Natural Resources Policy. Over the years McGibbon has played a central role in community building and fundraising in her community of North Hastings.
“Under the Wynne government we’ve experienced hardships impacting our families, children, seniors and business owners make it less and less affordable to live and do business in Ontario. We’ve seen skyrocketing electricity rates, excessive taxes, red tape, job losses and cut backs in health care and education. My community and rural Ontario are feeling the pain and I want to do something about it,” she stated.
As a mom, McGibbon pointed to recent news about provincial math scores as a worrying sign Ontario’s education system isn’t setting up Ontario’s kids or its future for success.
“As a parent, I believe we have a responsibility to give our kids the chance for a better future. That’s why I want to represent Hastings-Lennox & Addington at Queen’s Park,” she stated.





http://www.intelligencer.ca/20.....nomination
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2016 4:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( some odd good news for Wynne , a high profile Toronto city councillor wants to run as a liberal in Don Valley North , although it was already known she was a liberal so not a big surprise )

North York Councillor Shelley Carroll seeking provincial Liberal nomination


After 13 years at city hall, Carroll has eyes on representing new Don Valley North provincial constituency.
.

By Jennifer PagliaroCity Hall reporter

Tues., Oct. 11, 2016

A veteran of Toronto politics who served under three mayors is looking to move to Queen’s Park.

Councillor Shelley Carroll, who has represented her Ward 33 (Don Valley East) for 13 years, is seeking the Liberal nomination in the newly formed Don Valley North, she has told the Star.


“To me this is about renewal. You shouldn’t necessarily sit in one place forever and ever, amen,” said Carroll, who, elected to council in 2003, is part of a group of relative veterans that arrived at city hall under David Miller’s first administration.


It’s about renewal for the Liberal party as well, she said, going into the 2018 election.

“There have been times in Canadian history where a government is in office for a long time. And even within the time you’re in office, you can start renewing your caucus and that’s what’s going to happen here in 2018 if the Liberal party is to stay in government. And that’s a very exciting concept to me, so I answered the call this time.”

Carroll, who was previously a Toronto District School Board trustee and was tapped as Miller’s budget chief in 2006 and then had to face the global financial crisis of 2008, has turned down the Liberals in the past. The party had eyed her for the seat that came open before the 2011 election when former MPP David Caplan retired.

Carroll said Caplan called on the eve of that announcement. “But I just didn’t feel I could because it was really only six months after my municipal election, so that really would be musical chairs,” she said.

She said it would also have been a difficult time to walk away from municipal politics when longtime Etobicoke councillor Rob Ford had just been elected as mayor.


“The greater community didn’t really know yet how erratic he was and how difficult it was going to be to make sure things kept going at the city. But those of us who had worked with him for a long time did,” she said. “I just didn’t feel like I could leave my ward.”

Minister for Children and Youth Services MPP Michael Coteau now holds that Don Valley East riding. But after Wynne announced last year that the province would adopt federal riding boundaries, the creation of Don Valley North created a new opportunity for Carroll to run.

Following federal lines, Don Valley North stretches from Bayview Ave. to Victoria Park Ave. and from Steeles Ave. to Hwy. 401. It is home to several affluent, established neighbourhoods, including Bayview Village. The new riding encompasses all of Carroll’s current municipal ward and her more than 57,000 constituents, who have re-elected her three times with between 57 and 60 per cent of the vote. The Don Valley North Riding has a population of more than 103,000.

The timing would also allow Carroll to ride out much of the rest of this municipal term without leaving her ward vacant. A provincial election is expected in the spring of 2018. The city’s general election will be held in the fall of 2018.

Carroll said she expects local contention for the nomination race.

“The big question mark is who might the Conservatives put in Don Valley North,” she said. “But whoever’s there will face someone who’s stood for this entire community for 13 years, so they should think seriously about that.”

The longtime Liberal said she’s aware of the challenge the party faces, with Premier Kathleen Wynne’s declining popularity and recent scandals over campaign fundraising.

“I think when you’ve been in office for a long time you maybe forget why, as a province, this was the government you backed,” she said. “I backed the party and the government that made a huge change to my own family’s life as much as anything.”

Carroll remembers being very ill with back problems and diagnosed with Legionnaires’ disease before the Liberal government took power. She describes a hospital system that was in “complete shambles.” And as a mother and grandmother, she talks about how “insane” it was for working parents to deal with daycare.

“This is the government that changed that,” she said. “I want to be there to help in a campaign in 2018 where it seems that Ontario needs reminding that that’s what this government brought them, and they’ve forgotten the dark days they were in.”

She said the party is looking to have nomination races in new ridings settled by mid-2017.

As for her councillor role, Carroll said she remains “very committed” to the work of council, including as a member of the police board working on a promised transformational review of the force and the upcoming budget.


https://www.thestar.com/news/city_hall/2016/10/11/north-york-councillor-shelley-carroll-seeking-provincial-liberal-nomination.html
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2016 6:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The experience of being David Miller's Budget Chief is not exactly a recommendation for fiscal probity. She's probably a pretty good politician, though. What strikes me is that this is a pretty safe Liberal seat, and particularly for her, since she has worked the same ground for a dozen years. It

There can be little doubt that she was marginal in John Tory's council. I wouldn't think this is a propitious time for a move, otherwise. She could very well be jumping onto a sinking ship.
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Ontario pc's lead liberals 41% to 28 % in new poll

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