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RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Jun 15, 2016 1:23 pm    Post subject: federal liberals planning nationwide carbon tax ? Reply with quote

( is a nationwide carbon tax coming ? it appears the finance department may be planning one )

Brad Wall slams Ottawa for mulling carbon tax: 'Now is not the time'



Ian Vandaelle, chase producer, BNN
4:12 PM, E.T. | June 14, 2016
Energy and Resources


Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall says any talk of a carbon tax while the energy industry continues to struggle would be akin to hitting the auto sector during its meltdown seven years ago.

In an interview on BNN, Wall urged Ottawa to take a carbon tax off the table until there is a meaningful recovery in the west.

“I think it’s dissonant to even be talking about a carbon tax at such a time as this: imagine in 2009, when the auto sector was reeling, shedding jobs, requiring equity injections and direct investment from the federal government. Imagine if the federal government would have then been advocating for a national auto manufacturers tax,” he said.

“I mean, it would have seemed just wrong at the time, and it would have been wrong. Effectively, that’s what this is.”

Instead, the premier reiterated his stance on building out the nation’s energy infrastructure.

“Now is not the time [for a carbon tax.] My message to the federal government would be ‘how about championing the conveyance of energy across the country as a nation-building projects, something like Energy East.’ How about that?”

Wall is on an eastern Canadian tour promoting his province’s interests, including the approval of TransCanada’s 1,100km long pipeline.

He said getting approval for the pipeline would reduce the use of crude-by-rail, and would result in a safer option for moving oil.

“Energy East will take 1,500 railcars a day of oil and move it into a pipeline. Pipelines are not the perfect conveyance, but they are the superior mode of moving hydrocarbons across the country,” he said. “We know that railing oil increases the likelihood of a spill by 4.5 times, and so, if a pipeline moves oil from rail to a pipeline, as Energy East does, we’ve got to make that case.”

The premier will be meeting with his provincial counterparts in New Brunswick and Quebec in the coming days, provinces which are split on the future of the pipeline. Wall said he understands Quebec’s reluctance to sign on for the pipeline, but hopes headway can be made.

“This pipeline is roughly two-thirds existing line that will convert, a third that will be new construction, and most of the new construction, if not all of it, is in Quebec,” he said. “So, I understand they have different questions that they need answered from the proponent, from the federal government, and I understand that.”

The premier said his message to the federal government is simple: just don’t harm the western economies at this time.

“I think it’s important for the federal and provincial governments to do no harm to the energy sector at a time such as this,” he said. “There are 500,000 direct and indirect jobs of Canadians that depend on the sector, so let’s not be talking about a new tax right now, let’s be supportive of the industry.”

http://www.bnn.ca/News/2016/6/.....n-tax.aspx
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Jun 15, 2016 1:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Finance Canada eyes federal tax on carbon


Shawn McCarthy - GLOBAL ENERGY REPORTER

OTTAWA — The Globe and Mail


Published Sunday, Jun. 12, 2016 5:17PM EDT

Last updated Tuesday, Jun. 14, 2016 4:37PM EDT


241 Comments




Finance Canada is quietly pushing the idea of a federal carbon tax as the Liberal government looks to set a minimum national price and complement provincial carbon pricing plans, sources say.

Officials at Finance are co-chairing the “carbon pricing” working group, one of four federal-provincial-territorial groups established to fashion a national climate strategy that would put the country on the path toward meeting its international commitments to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

There have been no decisions made on how Ottawa will intervene on carbon pricing or even if it will do so. However, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said again last week that the goal is to have a minimum carbon price across the country – whether it is one imposed by Ottawa or adopted by all the provinces.

Several provinces, including Saskatchewan, Nova Scotia and Quebec reject any effort to introduce a federal tax, though they agreed at a first ministers’ conference in Vancouver that governments should adopt some undefined form of carbon pricing. Ontario opposes a federal effort to layer a carbon price on top of its own cap-and-trade system.

Officials are looking at a number of options for a carbon levy that they can present to ministers, including a broad-based excise tax that would be imposed on virtually all oil and natural-gas consumption, or a simple increase in the existing excise tax on gasoline and diesel, several federal and provincial sources involved in the talks said. Ottawa now collects 10 cents a litre on gasoline and 4 cents on diesel, as well as the 5-per-cent goods and services tax.

Finance Minister Bill Morneau sees the carbon tax as the most economically efficient way to drive emissions reductions, as opposed to some form of federal cap-and-trade system or emissions regulations on industry, sources say. However, Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall is campaigning aggressively against any federal carbon tax.

Department officials would not comment on specific measures or proposals.

“As officials continue their work, the Minister of Finance looks forward to working together with his colleagues and the provinces and territories in developing a pan-Canadian framework for clean growth and climate change that will not only help us meet our international commitments, but ensure a more innovative, low-carbon economy that will serve Canadian families well into the future,” his director of communications, Dan Lauzon, said in an e-mail.

Mr. Trudeau and the premiers agreed in March to produce a joint climate strategy by October that would be in keeping with commitments made at the Paris climate summit, where all nations agreed on the need to limit the increase in global temperatures to less than 2 degrees above preindustrial levels.

Canada faces a significant gap between emissions reductions that would result from current climate policies and what is needed to reduce emissions by 30 per cent below 2005 levels by 2030, as promised in Paris. And Ottawa has pledged under the Paris accord to improve on that target.

Key cabinet ministers, including Mr. Morneau and Environment Minister Catherine McKenna, will attempt to reach agreements this summer with individual provinces and build those bilateral efforts into a national plan. Provincial governments are urging Ottawa to focus its effort on spending in areas that achieve emissions reductions and on regulation, rather than intruding in the carbon-pricing field.

Four provinces representing 80 per cent of Canada’s emissions already have or are introducing carbon-pricing programs, either in the form of a direct tax or cap and trade: British Columbia, Alberta, Ontario and Quebec.

The Prime Minister said last week his government will ensure enough flexibility so that provincial governments can pursue their own approaches. But he added Canada needs to achieve significant GHG emission reductions, and carbon pricing is one of the “tools in the toolkit.”

Ottawa is looking for ways to cajole the provinces to do more, including the possibility of imposing carbon prices on those that don’t have them. The federal government could ease the conflict by guaranteeing that all money raised in a province would be recycled there to cut other taxes or reduce emissions.

Under such a plan, provinces that do impose carbon pricing could opt out of the federal plan as long as they can demonstrate equivalency. However, assessing whether plans are equivalent is fraught with challenges.

The federal government is currently in talks with British Columbia, encouraging Premier Christy Clark to move on her pledge to raise its carbon tax from the current $30 a tonne, where it has remained for five years.

An announcement that B.C. planned to increase its carbon tax would raise the bar for all provinces.

Ontario and Quebec are balking at any federal plan to introduce a carbon levy over and above the level of their own cap-and-trade plan, which would set a minimum price of roughly $20 a tonne by 2020. They argue a federal levy would distort the carbon markets they share with California and add to the burden already being faced by industry and consumers.


http://www.theglobeandmail.com.....e30408215/
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Fri Jun 17, 2016 5:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

When the Ontario Liberals added the 8% PST portion of the HST onto gasoline, electricity, natural gas, etc was there any evidence that it reduced emissions or even curbed consumption for that matter?

Calling it a carbon tax this time doesn't change the historic effect of taxing carbon in another manner, the result is likely going to be the same.

Rewarding efficiency rather than punishing inefficiencies would be the logic route forward as we have historically seen it has been effective in the limited bursts it was used.

If any government is serious about cutting emissions the first stop is rarely a revenue generating tax.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Mon Jun 20, 2016 11:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree with Cosmo, entirely. I don't think the climate has anything to do with the policy. It's about creating another flow of revenues.

People who live in Ontario should realize that they have become committed to a wacky, expensive methods of generating power, which comprise a supposed job-creating Green economy. Now factories are closing because of the cost of electricity, so much that we now sell that surplus energy to the US at a loss.

The top accountant recently outlined 10's of $billions of waste and inefficiency in the Ontario power grid -- which once was one of the premier such grids in the world.

Gerald Butts, one time right hand man to Dalton McGuinty, and help-mate to George Smitherman's self promotion, is now the right hand man to Justin Trudeau. Previous to that, he was head of the World Wildlife Federation. (Not that there's anything wrong with that!)

Given enough money, they'll create a lot of new jobs -- probably in Korea.
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Oct 03, 2016 11:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the long awaited carbon tax has been announced by trudeau , its appears they are forcing provinces to either price carbon or bring in a cap and trade system )


PM to provinces: Levy $10 per tonne of carbon by 2018


Laura Payton, Ottawa News Bureau Online Producer

@laura_payton
.
Published Monday, October 3, 2016 12:17PM EDT


The federal government wants all provinces and territories to impose a $10 per tonne carbon tax by 2018, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Monday.

Each province can choose between a carbon tax or a cap-and-trade system, as well as how to use the revenue generated. British Columbia, for example, provided tax cuts in exchange for its $30 per tonne price.

B.C.'s carbon tax has been in place since 2012. Ontario and Quebec have cap-and-trade systems, and Alberta has also introduced plans for a carbon tax. With those provinces on board, 80 per cent of Canadians live with some kind of carbon pricing.



The plan set out by Trudeau, during a speech calling for Canada to ratify last year's Paris climate agreement, calls for the price to rise by $10 a year until it hits $50 per tonne in 2022.

Environment Minister Catherine McKenna is meeting with her provincial and territorial counterparts in Montreal on Monday, to discuss a national carbon price. For almost a year, the Liberals have talked about coming to an agreement, but McKenna told CTV's Question Period last month that the government would impose a price if they can't reach a deal.

MPs are expected to vote Wednesday on whether to ratify the Paris agreement.



With files from CTV News' Genevieve Beauchemin

http://www.ctvnews.ca/politics.....-1.3099438
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Oct 03, 2016 11:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Justin Trudeau gives provinces 2 years to adopt carbon price plan

PM says federal government will impose carbon price plan on provinces that don't have one by 2018

CBC News Posted: Oct 03, 2016 11:34 AM ET| Last Updated: Oct 03, 2016 12:29 PM ET



Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has given provinces two years to adopt a carbon pricing scheme in the next two years, or the federal government will step in and impose a price.

A tough-talking Trudeau told MPs in the House of Commons that provinces can craft a cap-and-trade system or put a direct price on carbon pollution — but it must meet the federal benchmark or "floor price."

"If neither price nor cap and trade is in place by 2018, the government of Canada will implement a price in that jurisdiction," he said.

Trudeau made the announcement in leading off parliamentary debate on the Paris climate change agreement Monday, making the case for Canada to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 30 per cent from 2005 levels by 2030.



Trudeau said the proposed price on carbon pollution should start at a minimum of $10 per tonne in 2018, rising by $10 each year to $50 per tonne by 2022.

Provinces and territories that choose a cap-and-trade system must decrease emissions in line with both Canada's target and with the reductions expected in jurisdictions that choose a price-based system.

Whatever approach a province chooses, Trudeau said it will be revenue neutral for the federal government, with any revenues generated under the system staying in the province or territory where they are generated.

The 2030 target was set by the previous Conservative government under former prime minister Stephen Harper. The Trudeau government has called that goal a "floor" rather than a "ceiling" for what can be accomplished.

Debate in the House comes as Canada's environment ministers meet in Montreal to discuss collective efforts to fight climate change.

Federal Minister of Environment and Climate Change Catherine McKenna is trying to reach consensus with provincial and territorial ministers on a pan-Canada plan, but some are pushing back on a national carbon-pricing scheme.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politic.....-1.3788825
Bugs





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PostPosted: Mon Oct 03, 2016 1:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is this 'cooperative federalism'????

The federal level is acting just like the Supreme Court, giving the provinces an order to comply to the federal level's demands. Isn't the reason we have provincial elections so that we have an instrument to negotiate these things with the provinces?

He must be trying out the Chinese model that he admires so much!
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Oct 03, 2016 1:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
Is this 'cooperative federalism'????

The federal level is acting just like the Supreme Court, giving the provinces an order to comply to the federal level's demands. Isn't the reason we have provincial elections so that we have an instrument to negotiate these things with the provinces?

He must be trying out the Chinese model that he admires so much!


I don't understand why its being imposed so early without even much consultation of the provinces . I don't see why Ottawa would force provinces to impose there own carbon taxes or cap and trade systems if they didn't feel one was necessary .

some of the smaller provinces , the amount of carbon being released is tiny when compared to the overall world . if there amount goes down by 5 % or 10 % it really isn't going to go anything globally
Bugs





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PostPosted: Mon Oct 03, 2016 7:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It didn't take long!

Does it make you wonder about this Democratic deficit stuff? (If we had a real Senate, this federal-provincial jousting would be conducted by elected people.) The Liberals are clearly unaware of how these things work and yet they're the ones that are going to fix that?

I dunno ...

Quote:
Sask., N.S. and N.L. ministers walk out of national carbon pricing meeting after Trudeau ultimatum
By Bruce Cheadle , The Canadian Press — The Canadian Press — Oct 3 2016

MONTREAL — Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall tore a strip off Justin Trudeau while frustrated environment ministers walked out on their federal counterpart Monday after the prime minister promised to unilaterally impose a carbon price in those provinces and territories that won't do it themselves.

With provincial and territorial ministers gathered for a day of climate-change talks in Montreal, the prime minister kicked off a House of Commons debate on the Paris climate change accord with unexpected news: Ottawa will set — and enforce, if necessary — a minimum price for carbon pollution.

The federal plan sets a "floor price" of $10 a tonne starting in 2018 that increases to $50 a tonne by 2022.

Wall — a longtime opponent of pricing carbon — did not pull his punches.

"The level of disrespect shown by the prime minister and his government today is stunning," he said, accusing Trudeau of reneging on his promises to collaborate with the provinces.

"This is a betrayal of the statements made by the prime minister in Vancouver this March. And this new tax will damage our economy."

Wall said Saskatchewan will be one of the hardest hit by the carbon tax, which he estimated would siphon more than $2.5 billion from the province's economy once fully implemented, and cost the average family $1,250 a year. He called it "one of the largest national tax increases in Canadian history," saying Saskatchewan would investigate "all options" to mitigate the impact.

Trudeau gave the provinces just two options for implementing the carbon price: either impose their own direct price on carbon that meets or exceeds the national floor price, as British Columbia has already done, or set up a cap and trade system, such as Ontario and Quebec are developing.

If any province or territory does not implement one of the two options by 2018, "the government of Canada will implement a price in that jurisdiction," Trudeau warned, adding that all revenue would be given to the province or territory in which it is generated.
http://www.nationalnewswatch.c....._L1__krIdV


The whole of Canada emits about 1% or 2% of all the CO2 in the world! Anyone who thinks that the theories behind so-called Global Warming are developed enough, and certain enough, to become the basis of social policy is smoking something better than I've got.

Every day, Justin shows us what polished empty shirt can do.
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Oct 03, 2016 7:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

what gets me is that the liberals won every seat out east on the basis that Harper was mean and treated the area badly , newfoundland especially claimed the conservatives didn't want the province to have all its oil revenues or something back when danny Williams was premier there was a big dispute and all the cpc mp's either quit or lost seats in next election .

now we have trudeau doing things just as bad and what does the east coast governments even do about it ? perhaps nova scotia and newfoundland are serious in there opposition to a carbon tax but both being liberal governments I have my doubts , I think they both know there going to have a tougher re-election having to defend this tax on top of all the other taxes they've brought in . so they don't want to come out in support of it rate away .

I think the federal liberals have reached the " arrogant " ( we know better than you and do as we say ) stage and we can only expect more of this type of thing in the coming months and years ahead .
if harper had tried to pull this stunt there would of been so much provincial outrage it would of been a public relations disaster like we saw in newfoundland in 2008
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Oct 04, 2016 6:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Trudeau imposes a sin tax on energy


Postmedia Network

First posted: Monday, October 03, 2016 07:37 PM EDT | Updated: Monday, October 03, 2016 07:47 PM EDT



Justin Trudeau
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau delivers a speech in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Monday, Oct. 3, 2016. Trudeau announced the minimum price Canadians will have to pay for emitting industrial greenhouse gases into the air via the carbon tax, which charges whenever one purchases goods and services that consume fossil fuel energy. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick)


Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on Monday announced the minimum price Canadians will have to pay for emitting industrial greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, whenever they purchase goods and services that consume fossil fuel energy.

That means almost all goods and services.

This money grab from Canadians -- because real-world experience in other countries has shown it will do little, if anything, to lower emissions -- will start at $10 per tonne in 2018, rising by $10 annual increments to $50 per tonne in 2022.

Canadians will pay either through higher taxes on the goods and services they buy -- for example, through Alberta Premier Rachel Notley's carbon tax, which starts next year -- or higher prices -- for example, Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne's cap-and-trade scheme, also starting in 2017.

Any province refusing to establish the federal government's minimum carbon price will have it imposed by Ottawa.

In terms of costs to Canadians, Alberta estimates its carbon tax -- starting at $20 per tonne next year, rising to $30 in 2018 -- will cost the average Alberta household up to $613 annually in 2018, although it says many families will receive rebates.

In Ontario, the Wynne government says cap-and-trade in its first year will cost the average household $156 more in gasoline and home heating costs alone, based on an estimated carbon price of about $18 per tonne. But it has not said what the total cost to Ontarians will be.

Trudeau said his national minimum carbon price will be revenue neutral for the federal government, meaning the provinces will keep all of the money they raise.

However, it won't be revenue neutral to the public.

Trudeau's national carbon price will increase the cost of living of Canadians by billions of dollars annually, money which will pour into the coffers of provincial governments, for use as they see fit.

Basically, what Trudeau has announced is a new "sin tax" imposed on all Canadians for using fossil fuel energy to live in our big, cold, northern, sparsely populated country with a resource-based economy.

The other bad news is that the U.S., our largest trading partner, doesn't have a national carbon price, meaning our economy will be at a competitive disadvantage until it does.
http://www.torontosun.com/2016.....-on-energy
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Oct 04, 2016 6:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Federal carbon tax plan shows disrespect, will hurt economy: Sask. Premier


THE CANADIAN PRESS

First posted: Monday, October 03, 2016 04:55 PM EDT | Updated: Monday, October 03, 2016 08:11 PM EDT


MONTREAL — Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall tore a strip off Justin Trudeau while frustrated environment ministers walked out on their federal counterpart Monday after the prime minister promised to unilaterally impose a carbon price in those provinces and territories that won’t do it themselves.

With provincial and territorial ministers gathered for a day of climate-change talks in Montreal, the prime minister kicked off a House of Commons debate on the Paris climate change accord with unexpected news: Ottawa will set — and enforce, if necessary — a minimum price for carbon pollution.

The federal plan sets a “floor price” of $10 a tonne starting in 2018 that increases to $50 a tonne by 2022.

Wall — a longtime opponent of pricing carbon — did not pull his punches.

“The level of disrespect shown by the prime minister and his government today is stunning,” he said, accusing Trudeau of reneging on his promises to collaborate with the provinces.

“This is a betrayal of the statements made by the prime minister in Vancouver this March. And this new tax will damage our economy.”

Wall said Saskatchewan will be one of the hardest hit by the carbon tax, which he estimated would siphon more than $2.5 billion from the province’s economy once fully implemented, and cost the average family $1,250 a year. He called it “one of the largest national tax increases in Canadian history,” saying Saskatchewan would investigate “all options” to mitigate the impact.

Trudeau gave the provinces just two options for implementing the carbon price: either impose their own direct price on carbon that meets or exceeds the national floor price, as British Columbia has already done, or set up a cap and trade system, such as Ontario and Quebec are developing.

If any province or territory does not implement one of the two options by 2018, “the government of Canada will implement a price in that jurisdiction,” Trudeau warned, adding that all revenue would be given to the province or territory in which it is generated.

“There is no hiding from climate change,” he told the Commons on Monday. “It is real and it is everywhere.”

“We cannot undo the last 10 years of inaction. What we can do is make a real and honest effort — today and every day — to protect the health of our environment, and with it, the health of all Canadians.”

Trudeau’s pre-emptive announcement landed like a grenade in the midst of the environment ministers’ meeting in Montreal, where federal minister Catherine McKenna was supposed to be hashing out an agreement on carbon pricing with her provincial counterparts.

“The air was sucked out of the room,” Yukon’s Currie Dixon said of Trudeau’s announcement, calling it an odd way to build collaborative policy.

And Scott Moe, Saskatchewan’s minister, said, “Many westerners will see this as ’national energy program 2.0.” Moe later echoed his boss’s words, suggesting Trudeau’s “betrayal” could have lingering effects.

“It’s not a good day for federal-provincial relations,” he said.

Nova Scotia’s Margaret Miller said her province feels let down and surprised, saying it is already on track to make deep emissions cuts and doesn’t understand Ottawa’s move.

While Alberta’s NDP government supports a common price on carbon across the country, Premier Rachel Notley served notice that she’ll oppose the federal plan until she sees “serious concurrent progress” on the pipelines that her province needs to get its oil sands crude to tidewater.

“Albertans have contributed very generously for many years to national initiatives to help other regions address economic challenges,” Notley said in a written statement.

“What we are asking for now is that our landlock be broken, in one direction or another, so that we can get back on our feet.”

Quebec’s David Heurtel, the chairman of the meeting, and Ontario’s Glen Murray both welcomed the new federal policy, saying it fully recognizes their provincial jurisdiction.

Trudeau argued that pricing carbon pollution will give Canada a “significant advantage” in building a cleaner economy, compel businesses to innovate to find ways to reduce their emissions and create potentially hundreds of thousands of “new and exciting” clean tech jobs.

Stephen Guilbeault of the environmental advocacy group Equiterre lauded the move, even if he feels the $10 starting point is too low.

“They knew from the get-go that carbon pricing would be controversial,” Guilbeault said.

“They knew they wouldn’t get a consensus. It had to be done. Might as well get it out of the way now so we can talk about other things and stop arguing — which some provinces would have done until the bitter end.”

Conservative environment critic Ed Fast accused Trudeau of taking a “sledgehammer” to the provinces after having promised to usher in a new era of federal-provincial collaboration.

NDP environment critic Linda Duncan and Green Party leader Elizabeth May said the plan falls short of what needs to be done, criticizing Trudeau for adopting the previous Harper government’s targets for reducing emissions which the Liberals used to call weak and inadequate.

“We have the Conservative party thinking we go too far, we have the NDP thinking we’re not going far enough,” Trudeau observed.

“I think — like most Canadians will think — that we have got the right balance.”

http://www.torontosun.com/2016.....sk-premier
Bugs





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PostPosted: Tue Oct 04, 2016 9:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:
what gets me is that the liberals won every seat out east on the basis that Harper was mean and treated the area badly , newfoundland especially claimed the conservatives didn't want the province to have all its oil revenues or something back when danny Williams was premier there was a big dispute and all the cpc mp's either quit or lost seats in next election .

now we have trudeau doing things just as bad and what does the east coast governments even do about it ? perhaps nova scotia and newfoundland are serious in there opposition to a carbon tax but both being liberal governments I have my doubts , I think they both know there going to have a tougher re-election having to defend this tax on top of all the other taxes they've brought in . so they don't want to come out in support of it rate away .

I think the federal liberals have reached the " arrogant " ( we know better than you and do as we say ) stage and we can only expect more of this type of thing in the coming months and years ahead .
if harper had tried to pull this stunt there would of been so much provincial outrage it would of been a public relations disaster like we saw in newfoundland in 2008


I call this the Danny Williams effect. With Conservatives like that, no wonder we have a progress-fighting twirp as our Prime Minister, the start of a run-away deficit, and a bunch of spoiled brats yattering at us about our 'democratic deficit'.

Danny Williams should be shot and pissed on.
Progressive Tory





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PostPosted: Tue Oct 04, 2016 12:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am in favour of a BC style revenue neutral carbon tax.

The way Trudeau is going about his carbon tax doesn't look too great on him though. Bringing in a national plan isn't easy though due to the differences in provincial economies. It's going to be interesting to see how this all plays out.
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Oct 04, 2016 4:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nova Scotia ‘will not be implementing a carbon tax,’ premier says


By The Canadian Press — Oct 4 2016


The Canadian Press - CP

HALIFAX — Nova Scotia's premier dug in hard against Ottawa's carbon price scheme Tuesday, saying his province "definitely won't" impose a carbon tax.

Stephen McNeil also backed a decision by his environment minister, Margaret Miller, to walk out of federal-provincial meetings in Montreal over Ottawa's plan.

Miller joined her counterparts from Newfoundland and Labrador and Saskatchewan who also left Monday's climate-change talks after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau stood in the House of Commons and dropped his plan on the provinces.

"We talked about it," said McNeil. "When it became obvious, when the prime minister stood up, that they'd already made up their mind . . . it just became obvious that the minister should come home and figure out how we fit into this."

The federal plan calls for a $10-per-tonne price on carbon starting in 2018. That would rise by $10 per tonne each year until reaching $50 per tonne in 2022.

Trudeau gave the provinces two implementation options — either their own direct price on carbon that meets or exceeds the national floor price, or a cap and trade system.

McNeil said any imposition of either measure would be "up to the government (Ottawa) to make" if his province fails to choose.

"I will not be implementing a carbon tax. We believe there are other ways to achieve (reductions) and we are hoping to work with the national government to make that happen."

In St. John's Tuesday, Newfoundland and Labrador Premier Dwight Ball said many people were surprised by Trudeau's announcement.

"I think there are a number of provinces that are concerned with how it unfolded," he told reporters.

"It's fair to say that people were expecting an opportunity for further discussions which would lead into the anticipated first ministers' meeting in early December this year."

"We want to have more discussions."

McNeil said his province has led the country in the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and has already met Canada's target of a 30 per cent reduction in emissions from 2005 by 2030. He repeated that his province is looking at some sort of recognition for that work.

"There is a Canadian province (B.C.) that already has a carbon tax and there are others that have cap and trade," he said. "They have not had the success at reducing greenhouse gases like Nova Scotia."

McNeil was less definitive about Ottawa's cap and trade option, saying he wasn't sure whether it would work for Nova Scotia. He said the province is running models on its potential effects.

But he continued to dismiss the carbon tax, saying that it would simply put a greater financial burden on people who need to drive in a largely rural province like his own.

McNeil believes a better way would be a North American plan for the auto industry to implement further engine emissions standards.

"It would get us to what we are trying to achieve, which is a reduction in greenhouse gases," McNeil said.

Prince Edward Island Premier Wade MacLauchlan said Tuesday his province hoped to shape a flexible approach to carbon pricing.

He said any plan adopted by the Island would have to meet the objectives of mitigating the impact of climate change while fully participating in the economic and employment benefits of a green economy.

"This isn't just about dollars and cents. It's ultimately about what we're going to do to reduce our carbon emissions," he said.

"This will require further conversations with our regional partners and Island sectors and communities to ensure we have a full understanding of its impact," MacLauchlan said.

P.E.I. gets 75 per cent of its electricity from New Brunswick, and MacLauchlan said he would expect to work with that province on any approach.

Ball said his province is essentially already collecting about $70 a tonne on carbon pollution after doubling the gas tax to 33 cents per litre as of June 2. It was supposed to be a temporary measure as the government faces a projected $1.8-billion deficit.

But Ball said keeping the tax as a carbon price is one option the province is considering. Legislation to allow carbon pricing in some form has been on the books since the spring, he added.

Details must be worked out first, however: "What is the impact of a carbon tax for the long term on how we offer services?"

Ball said his province should be getting "offsetting" credits from Ottawa for building the $11.4-billion Muskrat Falls hydro project in Labrador. When completed, it will raise electricity rates while putting the province almost totally on renewable energy, he said.

Ball also clarified Tuesday that he never told his environment minister to walk out of Monday's meeting.

Perry Trimper told reporters in Montreal that he was leaving "at the direction of my premier." But Ball said that direction was, simply, for Trimper to use his own judgment on whether to stay or go.

"He has my support. I have confidence in Perry Trimper. He was there. This is far from over."

- By Keith Doucette in Halifax, Sue Bailey in St. John's and Kevin Bissett in Fredericton.

The Canadian Press


http://www.nationalnewswatch.c....._Qdx0n2Zjp
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federal liberals planning nationwide carbon tax ?

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