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RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Sep 15, 2016 8:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
RCO wrote:

I don't know if wynne is looking for any new cabinet ministers any time soon , there was just a cabinet shuffle a few months back and unlikely to be another in the next few months . so any new mpp is going to likely be in the backbench till next election .


The rumour leading up to Madeleine Meilleur resignation was that the Liberals could lose up to five cabinet ministers in the next year to resignations.

Without looking too hard at the tea leaves;
Glen Murray has already stated he won't seek re-election and I wouldn't be surprised if a position in the private sector arose in the next year or so for him.

It would be a good idea to add some talent in a riding that is safe that you may need to plug into a hole in cabinet should one arise.


I don't think wynne's problem is a lack of mpp's or a lack of talent , she still in terms of numbers has a large majority and some 50 plus mpp's . I think her government has reached a point similar to that of say the ndp in Manitoba or pc's in Newfoundland where the same party has been in power for too long and gone stale . a cabinet shuffle of throne speech isn't going to be enough to solve this problem .
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Sep 22, 2016 12:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( buy election is Ottawa vanier ? wynne there pre-election with bags of money for schools and daycare in the very riding soon to elect a new mpp )


Reevely: Wynne kicks off unofficial Ottawa-Vanier campaign with $1.5M in daycare funding




David Reevely
More from David Reevely

Published on: September 22, 2016 | Last Updated: September 22, 2016 1:38 PM EDT


Ontario's new premier, Kathleen Wynne, holds her first press conference at the Delta Chelsea Hotel in downtown Toronto, on the morning after her win at the Liberal convention. MICHAEL PEAKE/Toronto Sun/QMI Media

Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne. MICHAEL PEAKE/Toronto Sun/QMI Media / MICHAEL PEAKE/Toronto Sun/QMI Media



Ontario Liberal leader Kathleen Wynne campaigned in Ottawa Thursday, bringing $1.5 million with her for new daycare spaces at a Vanier elementary school.

Technically, there’s no election on. Not even the byelection in Ottawa-Vanier, following the resignation of Liberal MPP Madeleine Meilleur — that’s coming at some point but hasn’t been called. And yet Wynne’s second visit to Ottawa in a week was as re-election-oriented as the first last Friday, during which she toured a Hydro Ottawa control centre to boast about cutting sales tax off electricity bills and went “mainstreeting” on Bank Street in the Glebe.

The Liberals named the team running their 2018 general-election campaign on Monday, including moving Wynne’s deputy chief of staff Patricia Sorbara out of the premier’s office and into the top spot in the Liberal party apparatus. The Liberals are doing badly in the polls, trailing the Progressive Conservatives everywhere except in Toronto proper, dragged down by Wynne’s personal unpopularity.

“Life is harder under the Liberals” is the slogan the Tories have been trying out for most of this year, with some obvious success.

Break the poll results down by age, though, and the Liberals right now perform best among thirtysomethings and seniors — people the most conscious of just how much they rely on government-funded services in child care, education and health.



So: the daycare announcement, slotted in before meetings with Asian business leaders and a state dinner for Chinese Premier Li Keqiang. As with the Hydro Ottawa visit last week, Wynne was putting some meat on the bones of a plan announced in her government’s throne speech a couple of weeks ago, in this case to add 100,000 new licensed daycare spaces for infants, toddlers and pre-schoolers by 2022. It’ll allow practically every Liberal MPP to hit schools and daycares promising money for the next year and a half, telling parents of young children that actually, life is easier than it used to be.

The $1.5 million will pay for three additional daycare rooms at École élémentaire catholique Horizon-Jeunesse, including 49 new spaces. The building — nearly 70 years old and formerly Eastview High School, built for a different purpose in a different era — is already scheduled for a total reconstruction with $8.2 million in provincial money.

Along with child-care minister Indira Naidoo-Harris, Wynne read a story about a rushed rabbit and a serene turtle to a small group of three-year-olds in Horizon-Jeunesse’s existing daycare, and then subjected some slightly older ones to her political announcement as they sat in little chairs in a hot classroom, surrounded by strangers. They bore it with grace, applauded dutifully when Naidoo-Harris instructed them to, and high-fived the premier and minister at their request.

(This is simultaneously a cynical use of innocent children and totally standard campaign work. Gross, but not uniquely gross.)

“Our government’s been working hard to help families out by adding new child-care spaces,” Wynne told the kids — 56,000 so far and more to come. They’ll be building new space at places like Horizon-Jeunesse. They’ll renovate in others, support programs at community centres and workplaces. “We believe the government can and must make a difference in people’s daily lives.”

Consider Naidoo-Harris’s explanation of the plans. Follow it carefully, because it jumps around a bit.

“It will give more children, more of our young people, the opportunity to transition from child-care to full-day kindergarten in the same school,” she said. “Think about it: That seamless transition and that seamless care. That’s what it takes. That’s what’s needed to make sure that our children are successful when it comes to their education. Because what we’re doing is making life easier, less complicated, more convenient, because as you all know our lives are challenging enough as it is. So we’re trying to do something to help those families out so that our children can thrive … This is the help and support that working families needed.”

The daycare juggle is hard on households with two working parents, brutal on single moms and dads. Full-day kindergarten, with built-in options for extra supervision before and after school, has helped. A hundred thousand new licensed spaces, many of them in schools like Horizon-Jeunesse, actually will make life easier for thousands upon thousands of people — less tension for parents trying to balance working life with hard daycare closing times, less schlepping for kids.

It’s more noble to present it in terms of helping with children’s educations, but easing parents’ schedules is a real benefit, day in and day out, to a certain segment of voters. The segment that dominates suburban ridings where majority governments are won and lost.

http://ottawacitizen.com/news/.....re-funding
RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 2016 2:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( news of a high profile ont pc candidate in Ottawa Vanier , former ombudsman Andre Marin , this is an interesting development in an otherwise sleepy riding , no date yet for by-election but getting the feeling its going to be an interesting one )



Former ombudsman André Marin wants to run for Progressive Conservatives in Ottawa-Vanier




David Reevely
More from David Reevely

Published on: September 24, 2016 | Last Updated: September 24, 2016 6:00 AM EDT


Ontario Ombudsman Andre Marin speaks at a news conference at Queens Park in Toronto on Tuesday February 4, 2014 to announce his latest investigation into complaints about billing practices by Hydro One.



Former Ontario ombudsman André Marin wants to run for the opposition Progressive Conservatives in the upcoming Ottawa-Vanier byelection, driven into elected politics by anger over petty tweaks to electricity prices announced in the latest throne speech.

“You have an institution, which is parliament, and the speech from the throne is reserved for some pretty big stuff. Policy directions, big changes,” Marin said in an interview Friday. Instead, Premier Kathleen Wynne used the Sept. 12 speech to tout a hydro rebate equivalent to provincial sales tax and a plan for more daycare spaces.

“It’s a teeny weeny, itsy-bitsy hyperpartisan speech and I said to myself, enough is enough. Hydro rates are soaring through the roof, people are paying $1,000 a year more on hydro since the Liberals are in and now we get thrown this bone. Kathleen Wynne’s world is like Alice in Wonderland. It’s this blue-sky world and we’re worrying about our grandchildren when we can’t pay today’s bills,” Marin said.

He contacted the Progressive Conservatives and said he wanted in. Leader Patrick Brown welcomed him with open arms.

“There’s a saying in Ottawa-Vanier that all you need to get elected is to be a donkey with a red bowtie. I think those days are over. The riding has been Liberal since 1971, which is the year the Maple Leafs last won the Stanley Cup, the year Pierre Trudeau married Margaret Trudeau. It’s been way too long. The people of Ottawa-Vanier have been taken for granted,” Marin said.


(The Leafs last won the Stanley Cup in 1967. Though that was the year Tory Jules Morin last won the seat for the Progressive Conservatives. He held it till 1971.)

Marin’s career includes stints as a Crown prosecutor, director of Ontario’s Special Investigations Unit that examines serious injuries and deaths involving police, and the federal military ombudsman. Marin now teaches part-time in the University of Ottawa’s law faculty and writes a column for the Ottawa and Toronto Suns. He’s a father of six children.

As Ontario’s ombudsman, he denounced government carelessness and malfeasance, issuing reports with eye-catching visuals — he commissioned an artist to draw Hydro One as a pig gorged on money with plugs for trotters for a report on the utility’s billing practices – and giving take-no-prisoners news conferences. He issued fiery reports on prisoner abuse in Ontario’s jails, on crowd-control tactics during mass protests, on slack oversight of home daycares.

“I was always a champion for the little guy,” he said.

He was also a self-promoter who campaigned openly for more powers, and billed hundreds of thousands in expenses related to living in Ottawa while working in Toronto. When his last term was due to expire a year ago last May, he organized a Twitter protest demanding that he be reappointed.

He got a short extension, just long enough for the government to settle on a different successor: former federal taxpayers’ ombudsman Paul Dubé. Dubé is much lower-key and believes a less confrontational attitude than Marin’s gets better results. In a late-evening Twitter venting just the other day, Marin called him a doormat, Marie Antoinette and a village idiot.


He was defending himself, he said Friday. If he’s occasionally gone farther than he should have, he still feels good about his public persona overall.

“I’ve been my own boss all my life. Of course it’s a different transition and I fully accept it. But I believe in the leader of the Progressive Conservative party. He’s fiscally responsible, socially progressive, and that pretty well describes me. I will be a good party player,” Marin said.

Asked what issues need particular attention in Ottawa-Vanier, Marin returned to electricity prices — “the issues that are affecting everyone across Ontario. We are creating a new league of poverty over hydro rates,” he said.

Marin lives in south Nepean, well away from Ottawa-Vanier, but he said his years studying and now teaching at the University of Ottawa give him a strong connection. Plus all the time and money he’s spent in ByWard Market restaurants, he joked.

The timing of the election is in Wynne’s hands; she hasn’t called it yet. The Liberals convinced U of O law dean and civil-rights advocate Nathalie Des Rosiers (the head of the law faculty where Marin teaches now) to seek their nomination in Ottawa-Vanier. The New Democrats have nominated Claude Bisson, a retired civilian RCMP executive and brother of their house leader Gilles Bisson.

University of Ottawa education professor Cameron Montgomery also declared he wanted to run under the Tory banner but will switch to challenging Liberal cabinet minister Marie-France Lalonde in Orléans in the next general election instead, the party says.

http://ottawacitizen.com/news/.....awa-vanier
RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 2016 2:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( there is going to be a battle this time around in Ottawa Vanier , I say Wynne is in deep trouble province wide and even a safe seat like this is going to be much harder to win back then they realise )




Andre Marin to run for Tories in Ottawa-Vanier byelection

Controversial former ombudsman says he can no longer sit on the sidelines and wants to take the battle to Queen's Park.



Andre Marin speaks about his report on Hydro One billing practices in Toronto on Monday, May 25, 2015. Marin is jumping into politics and running for the Progressive Conservatives in an upcoming byelection.

THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn



By: Staff The Canadian Press Published on Sat Sep 24 2016



OTTAWA - Ontario's controversial former ombudsman is jumping into politics and running for the Progressive Conservatives in an upcoming byelection in Ottawa-Vanier.


Andre Marin says after fighting for average people as ombudsman for a decade, he can no longer sit on the sidelines and wants to take the battle to Queen's Park.


As ombudsman, Marin issued a report that said Hydro One mistreated and misled customers about billing problems. He vowed Saturday to tackle high electricity prices if elected.


Marin served as ombudsman for two five-year terms until last year and has since filed a lawsuit against the government for wrongful dismissal, alleging Premier Kathleen Wynne and the Liberals “orchestrated” his removal from public office.


Marin alleges he was fired without cause and without notice and is suing for two years of pay and $3 million in damages.


The Ottawa-Vanier seat has been vacant Liberal MPP Madeleine Meilleur announced she was leaving politics in June. The government has yet to set a date for the vote.


PC Leader Patrick Brown praised Marin's record of holding government accountable in announcing the candidacy on Saturday.


“Andre Marin was a whistleblower on government waste and mismanagement for 10 years. He stood up for the little guy. He was a voice for Ontarians,” he said in a statement.




“And as a lifelong resident of Ottawa, Marin is no stranger to the local challenges residents face. The people of Ottawa-Vanier would be able to count on him to represent their best interests with integrity and passion.”


The premier's office did not comment when Marin launched his legal action earlier this year.

http://www.metronews.ca/news/o.....ories.html
Bugs





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PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 2016 7:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I like this guy. He was very fact-based in his work as Ombudsman, but the role is necessarily limited. Still, it's great experience for a future conservative politician.

This is a guy who has seen where the best of intentions, turned into social policy, have become twisted into something very different than intended. It a problem we live with, in the massiveness of the modern state. There always seems to be unintended consequences.
RCO





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PostPosted: Sun Sep 25, 2016 12:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
I like this guy. He was very fact-based in his work as Ombudsman, but the role is necessarily limited. Still, it's great experience for a future conservative politician.

This is a guy who has seen where the best of intentions, turned into social policy, have become twisted into something very different than intended. It a problem we live with, in the massiveness of the modern state. There always seems to be unintended consequences.


Ottawa Vanier is normally a riding the pc's wouldn't have a chance in , rate downtown Ottawa mostly urban with a few suburban areas and includes university of Ottawa . but wynne's numbers are so low in eastern Ontario the by-election is going to be a lot closer than normal . it will still be a lot of work to run a serious campaign in that riding to give him a shot of getting elected there .
he would make a great addition to queen's park , could you imagine him there during question period going after the liberals it be great
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Mon Sep 26, 2016 9:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I like Andre Marin as a Candidate;
But I still think its a huge uphill battle for the PCs to win this riding.

The fact that Marin is suing the Province and running on the Electricity prices platform keeps those issues in the forefront which is good politics;
Bugs





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PostPosted: Mon Sep 26, 2016 11:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

On the other hand, it might be good experience, and if he loses, perhaps his good showing will find him a more winnable seat.

If I were Patrick Brown, I'd be looking for people like Andre Martin.

In the meantime, PCs should be telling the rest of the province of the 'juice' flowing into the riding just because a minister resigned. Maybe that's the best thing most Liberal MPs could do -- resign their seats! Then the riding could at least hope for some of that manna from Liberal heaven!
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Sep 26, 2016 1:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( mostly about the federal riding but some interesting facts about the riding included in article , there is much more interest in the federal liberal nomination than the provincial race I noticed )

Ottawa-Vanier


A month after Bélanger’s death, potential Liberal candidates for Ottawa-Vanier riding waiting to see if widow runs


Ottawa city councillor Mathieu Fleury, former Liberal MP Francis LeBlanc, and communications consultant Mona Fortier are considering running for Liberal nomination in Ottawa-Vanier.

By ABBAS RANA


PUBLISHED : Monday, Sept. 26, 2016 12:00 AM



Before making their decision to enter the nomination contest in the coveted federal riding of Ottawa-Vanier, Ont., potential Liberal candidates are awaiting to see if Catherine Bélanger, widow of late-Liberal MP Mauril Bélanger, will run for the party’s nomination.

“It’s a factor, of course,” said Mona Fortier, a potential candidate and a friend of the Bélanger family.

“There’s much respect to give to Catherine, as a friend of Catherine and Mauril, and as Mauril was a mentor. Catherine and Mauril were a team. She was also mentoring me for the past 20 years that I have known her. … She needs to also have an opportunity to mourn and she also has to have time [to make her decision],” said Ms. Fortier.

A strategic communications consultant in Ottawa, a former riding association president, and a mother of three, Ms. Fortier declined to say whether she would run for the nomination if Ms. Bélanger entered the race.

“I’m interested but I’m not ready to declare at this time because there’re many answers I don’t have,” said Ms. Fortier.

Ms. Bélanger, a retired civil servant, was not available for an interview last week. But Liberals in the riding told The Hill Times that she is well respected and well known locally. She used to accompany her late husband to all political events in the riding and in the Ottawa area. Some Liberals said that if Ms. Bélanger decided to run for Liberal nomination, some potential candidates may decide not to run out of respect for the Bélanger family and also in anticipation they would lose to her.

Mauril Belanger-0275.t57c1fc63.m800.x80b21286
Catherine Bélanger at her husband’s funeral last month at the Notre Dame Basilica in Ottawa. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia

During his parliamentary career, he held several prestigious positions. In the Paul Martin cabinet, Mr. Bélanger served as associate minister of National Defence, minister of official languages, minister of democratic reform, and deputy government leader in the House. In the current Parliament, he initially sought the House Speaker’s position but was forced to back out days later following his ALS diagnosis.

One of the safest Liberal ridings in the country, Ottawa-Vanier became vacant last month after Mr. Bélanger died of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig’s disease. The MP, who was diagnosed with ALS in November, served in Parliament for about 21 years. First elected to the House in a 1995 byelection following then-incumbent MP Jean-Robert Gauthier’s appointment to the Senate, Mr. Bélanger has won all seven federal elections since.


The riding in question is home to the official residences of the prime minister, the Governor General, and the leader of the official opposition. Many cabinet minsters, MPs, Senators, judges, top civil servants, businessmen, and diplomats also live there in the tony neighbourhood of Rockcliffe Park. The riding also includes some of Ottawa poorer neighbourhoods.

Since the riding’s creation in the 1930s, only Liberals have ever been elected federally and provincially. In last year’s federal election, Mr. Bélanger won 57.5 per cent of the vote compared to second place NDP candidate Emilie Taman with 19.2 per cent. The third-place Conservative candidate David Piccini won 19.1 per cent, and the fourth place Green Party candidate Nira Dookeran won three per cent.

In 2011, the Liberal Party’s electoral result was the worst in the party’s history and ended up with only 34 seats nationally, and Mr. Bélanger’s margin of victory was was just nine percentage points. In the federal elections before that, Mr. Bélanger and his predecessors won by comfortable double-digit margins. In some cases, the winning margin for the Liberal candidates was more than double or triple the number of votes won by second-place candidates.

Ottawa-Vanier is home to a large Franco-Ontarian population. According to Statistics Canada’s 2011 census profile, this riding had a population of just more than 100,000 and about 28,o00 considered French their mother tongue.


Ottawa-Vanier is the only riding in the country, currently, where constituents don’t have representation at the provincial or federal level.

The riding’s provincial MPP and attorney general, Madeleine Meilleur, resigned in June to spend more time with her family. This means the political parties will hold nomination meetings for both federal and provincial spots within the next few months. As of last week, the provincial Liberals had not set a nomination date either.

As of last week, only the provincial Liberal nomination contest was open but the nomination date was not fixed.

Braeden Caley, senior director of communication for the federal Liberal Party, told The Hill Times that the process to choose the federal candidate in the riding will start in the coming weeks.

The Conservatives and the NDP had not fixed a nomination date to choose their candidates either, as of last week.

Meanwhile, Tony Stikeman, president of the Ottawa-Vanier riding association, told The Hill Times that several potential candidates have expressed their interest to run federally in this riding, but he declined to share names.

“Several candidates have expressed unofficially their interest in running for the nomination,” said Mr. Stikeman. “As of yet, to the best of my knowledge, none of them have announced officially their candidacy.”

In interviews last week, some potential candidates confirmed that they’re considering running for Liberal nomination in this riding.

“I’m giving it a serious consideration,” said a former two-term Liberal MP Francis LeBlanc, who has been living in Ottawa-Vanier for about two decades. He represented the riding of Cape Breton Highlands-Canso, N.S., from 1988 to 1997 but lost his seat to former Progressive Conservative and later Conservative MP Peter MacKay in the 1997 general election. Following the election loss, Mr. LeBlanc moved to Ottawa to work as chief of staff to former foreign affairs minister Pierre Pettigrew. Currently, he’s executive director of the Canadian Association of former Parliamentarians.

Ottawa City Councillor Mathieu Fleury also told The Hill Times that he’s considering seeking Liberal nomination in this riding but has not made a final decision.

“It’s something that I’m open to,” said Mr. Fleury, who represents the Rideau-Vanier ward, which is part of the Ottawa-Vanier riding.

Councillors Tim Tierney and Tobi Nussbaum, who also represent wards in the federal riding, are rumoured to be considering a run. Neither responded to interview requests.

Nicolas Moyer, executive director of Humanitarian Coalition, a relief efforts agency in international humanitarian crises, said that he’s considering to run for Liberal nomination in this riding “very seriously.” Mr. Moyer said he hopes the process to elect the new candidate will be open, transparent, and fair.

“I have no indication that it will be anything except fair,” Mr. Moyer said. “It will be an open process. I certainly hope that remains the case because it is a successful riding historically for the party. There’s every reason to have an open race and I have only heard that. I have not heard the opposite. I’m not worried, but I do think it’s important to continue to say it. I don’t think this opportunity should be wasted to have an open process.”

Ottawa-Vainer will be one of the first ridings in the country where registered Liberals who joined the party this summer without paying fees, as per the new rules, will be able to vote in a nomination contest. Earlier this summer, the Liberals eliminated the $10 membership fee. The Conservative Party’s membership fee is $15 while the NDP’s membership fees vary from province to province, ranging between no fee and $25.

Mr. Caley said that since membership became free for the Liberal Party two months ago, more than 30,000 Canadians have registered as Liberals. He did not, however, have total membership numbers for the party.

Currently, there are four—three in Alberta and one in Ontario—vacant federal ridings. In Alberta, there’s Medicine Hat-Cardston-Warner due to the sudden death of MP Jim Hillyer in March, Calgary Heritage following former prime minister Stephen Harper’s resignation last month, and the riding of Calgary Midnapore after Conservative MP Jason Kenney resigned last week to run for the leadership of the Alberta Progressive Conservatives.

Potential candidates for Liberal nomination in Ottawa-Vanier interviewed for this article said that free party membership is a new dynamic in Liberal nomination contests and they will have to come up with new creative ways to reach out to these members who have registered online. Also, another step will be to encourage these registered Liberals to show up to vote at nomination elections.

“If you put in $10, you’re more inclined and you feel more accountable to the candidate and their team,” said Mr. Fleury. “That will play into the discussion. It’ll be interesting to see if turnouts can increase, because I guess that’s the goal of removing that financial barrier.”

He added that one of the most important aspects to watch in the upcoming Liberal nominations will be how successful nomination contestants are in convincing registered Liberals to show up to vote.

“The most critical factor will be how to bring out a resident or a supporter that is registered online who’s paid no money,” said Mr. Fleury. “It’s certainly a good thing to see the financial barriers removed but does that equate a vote at the nomination process? I don’t know.”

Mr. LeBlanc agreed that the party’s decision to eliminate membership fee has changed the dynamics of nomination contests.

“It’s going to change the dynamics of the campaign to probably require whoever is in the race to come up with new ways to reach out to the eligible voters. … It’s going to add a new dynamic to the process; there’s no doubt about that,” said Mr. LeBlanc.

Former Liberal MP Ted Hsu, who represented the Ontario riding of Kingston and the Islands from 2011 to 2015, told The Hill Times that one likely unintended consequence of free memberships is that it could make it easier for single-issue groups to take over riding associations and affect the outcome of nomination contests. He said that he has made a submission to the party with suggestions on how to address this issue. Mr. Hsu declined to share details, saying that he wants the party to examine his submission first and decide if they want to use his suggestions.

Meanwhile, André Marin, Ontario’s former ombudsman, announced on Twitter on Saturday morning that he’s running for the provincial riding of Ottawa-Vanier for the Progressive Conservatives.

https://www.hilltimes.com/2016/09/26/potential-liberal-candidates-for-belangers-riding-waiting-to-see-if-widow-runs/81394
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Fri Sep 30, 2016 10:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:


I don't think wynne's problem is a lack of mpp's or a lack of talent , she still in terms of numbers has a large majority and some 50 plus mpp's . I think her government has reached a point similar to that of say the ndp in Manitoba or pc's in Newfoundland where the same party has been in power for too long and gone stale . a cabinet shuffle of throne speech isn't going to be enough to solve this problem .


The Throne Speech clearly helped somewhat;
http://ipsos-na.com/news-polls.....px?id=7391

While that be the outer even Innovative is showing a narrowing of the gap;
http://innovativeresearch.ca/w.....litics.pdf

I will reserve judgment till the next Forums Poll but there is still some fight yet in the Government.

As for "talent".
The Liberals got Glenn Thibeault elected and then with a short period of time tossed him into the highly public Energy Portfolio, why wouldn't they want to add a potential cabinet minister in a fairly safe seat in Ottawa if possible?


Last edited by cosmostein on Fri Sep 30, 2016 10:54 am; edited 1 time in total
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Fri Sep 30, 2016 10:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
On the other hand, it might be good experience, and if he loses, perhaps his good showing will find him a more winnable seat.

If I were Patrick Brown, I'd be looking for people like Andre Martin.


Agreed.
Marin has been working his butt off for the last week, even if he doesn't win this seat moving him to a more winnable Ottawa riding in 2018 would be a good idea.

He is a high energy candidate;
Fits in with the imagine Patrick Brown is building.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Fri Sep 30, 2016 2:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For any party, 'safe' seats are a scarce resource. It follows that, at both levels, the parties will be looking for candidates that bring something extra to the table. They want people who are heavy on scholarship, administration, or specialty knowledge of interest to the government or are political heavyweights for other reasons.

It means they can get people who are not particularly 'attractive' as popular candidates, but whose judgement can be developed in a political context quickly.

So it follows that it will be very interesting who these ridings attract as Liberal candidates.

My bet: the Federal Liberals have enough jam to attract somebody that adds to the party in what they see as an important way. It may supplement some area of the party -- like Kyoto-like social policies -- as well.

On the other hand, who would want to get on Wynne's sinking ship?

The magnitude of the star will tell us a lot about the social resources they have behind them.
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 30, 2016 2:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
RCO wrote:


I don't think wynne's problem is a lack of mpp's or a lack of talent , she still in terms of numbers has a large majority and some 50 plus mpp's . I think her government has reached a point similar to that of say the ndp in Manitoba or pc's in Newfoundland where the same party has been in power for too long and gone stale . a cabinet shuffle of throne speech isn't going to be enough to solve this problem .


The Throne Speech clearly helped somewhat;
http://ipsos-na.com/news-polls.....px?id=7391

While that be the outer even Innovative is showing a narrowing of the gap;
http://innovativeresearch.ca/w.....litics.pdf

I will reserve judgment till the next Forums Poll but there is still some fight yet in the Government.

As for "talent".
The Liberals got Glenn Thibeault elected and then with a short period of time tossed him into the highly public Energy Portfolio, why wouldn't they want to add a potential cabinet minister in a fairly safe seat in Ottawa if possible?


the next election is still a long time off when you think about things , so these by-elections are just a reality of how things are now not necessary a year or two from now . rate now wynne is in trouble and her government is not overly popular among a large % of Ontario voters who are ready for change .

I don't think the pc's should worry about the polls that much , they will go up and down and get closer and such , what they should focus on is finding quality candidates people want to vote for and winnable policy that gains the party votes not loser policy that costs it votes . they need to focus on building a credible alternative to Wynne's government
RCO





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PostPosted: Sun Oct 02, 2016 8:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( in a bizarre move the PAO or police association of Ontario has gone political and criticised Marin as a candidate and claim he is anti police ? its highly unusual for the police in Ontario to enter political elections or nominations or to support or go against a specific candidate , as far is I know opp officers here aren't even suppose to put signs on there lawns as to who there voting for , they typically don't get involved with provincial politics )


Cop association slams Brown for picking Marin as a PC candidate

By Jenny Yuen, Toronto Sun
First posted: Saturday, October 01, 2016 06:51 PM EDT | Updated: Saturday, October 01, 2016 06:54 PM EDT



Andre Marin
Andre Marin, right, is embraced by PC Leader Patrick Brown while announcing he's jumping into provincial politics as the Progressive Conservative candidate for Ottawa-Vanier Saturday September 24, 2016. (Ashley Fraser/Postmedia Network)



Patrick Brown throwing his support behind Andre Marin is a decision that was “short-sighted and shameful,” according to the Police Association of Ontario.

In a strongly-worded letter sent to the Ontario PC Party leader Thursday, PAO president Bruce Chapman expressed the group’s “profound disappointment” that the party nominated Marin — the former Ontario Ombudsman and director of the Special Investigations Unit — to run in the upcoming byelection in Ottawa-Vanier.

“Your decision to endorse Mr. Marin is an insult to the work done by the thousands of men and women who have chosen policing in Ontario as a profession,” Chapman wrote.

“Over the course of his life as a public figure, Mr. Marin has made it his goal to disparage, demean and dehumanize police at every opportunity. In both his role as SIU and Ombudsman, positions designed to be held by impartial and dispassionate public servants, Mr. Marin made his anti-police bias obvious.”

He plans on reaching out to the association’s members in the Ottawa-area to voice concerns on a local level.

“I am hopeful that the Ontario PC Party will be unsuccessful in the coming by-election and you can find some way to repair the severe damage done to your relationship with Ontario’s police,” Chapman wrote. “While my confidence in the former is strong, my confidence in the latter is decidedly weaker.”

Brown’s press secretary Nick Bergamini declined to comment on Saturday.

Reached by e-mail on Saturday, Marin argued he has “made my entire career one of supporting policing.

“For the first six years of my career, I worked hand-in-glove with the police as an assistant Crown attorney. My book ‘The Guide to Investigations and Prosecutions’ was used for my years as a teaching tool at police colleges,” he said.

“As Ontario’s Ombudsman, I published two reports making recommendations to strengthen police oversight so as to increase the public’s confidence in the police and make their jobs easier. I also published a report ‘In the Line of Duty’ that found that the OPP neglected their front-line members’ mental health leading to more officers dying by suicide than killed in the line of duty. My report, which received substantial acclaim by front-line police officers, led to far-reaching and immediate changes by the OPP brass to better serve their members’ needs.

“Finally, I’ve recently supported police services equipping front-line officers with body cams to record encounters with the public, a position widely supported by officers and police associations.”

On Sept. 24, days before the PAO issued its objection to Marin, Brown praised the newly-minted candidate in a statement on the party’s website.

“André Marin was a whistle blower on government waste and mismanagement for 10 years. He stood up for the little guy. He was a voice for Ontarians,” Brown said.

“The fact of the matter is that 13 years of Liberal scandal, waste and mismanagement has made life harder for the people of Ontario. In Ottawa-Vanier, residents have been left to face rising hydro rates, diminished job prospects, and lack of access to health care services.”

http://www.torontosun.com/2016.....-candidate
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 6758
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Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Fri Oct 07, 2016 8:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( according to a post I found on google from twitter the liberal nomination is oct 15 and reporter though a possible date for by-election could be nov 17 )



Robert Benzie Verified account 
‏@robertbenzie
Ottawa-Vanier Liberal nomination is Oct. 15. That suggests Nov. 17 byelections there and in Niagara West-Glanbrook. #onpoli

https://twitter.com/robertbenzie/status/781255543549792256
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Ontario AG Madeline Meilleur resigns as mpp Ottawa Vanier

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