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is Kathleen Wynne the most corrupt premier in Ontario's history
yes
50%
 50%  [ 2 ]
maybe
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
no
50%
 50%  [ 2 ]
Total Votes : 4

Author Message
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
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Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Thu Nov 03, 2016 7:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( its bad when even the liberal star is starting to question her judgement , its only going to get worse for her until she resigns , she is clearly corrupt and doesn't care )


Premier Kathleen Wynne should have asked aide to step down much earlier: Editorial


Premier Kathleen Wynne ran on an election platform of winning back credibility and respect for the Liberal Party. She has put it at risk by not showing better judgment around the Sudbury byelection scandal.


Premier Kathleen Wynne should have asked her deputy chief of staff, Pat Sorbara, to step down when the first whiff of scandal hit over the Sudbury byelection. (Adrian Wyld / The Canadian Press)



Wed., Nov. 2, 2016



Loyalty is a rare thing in politics. So Premier Kathleen Wynne can perhaps be lauded for sticking by her former deputy chief of staff, Pat Sorbara.

In this case, though, the loyalty turns out to have been badly misplaced. And now the premier and her Liberal party are being badly embarrassed as Sorbara faces two counts of bribery under the provincial Elections Act over events that allegedly took place during the lead-up to the 2015 Sudbury byelection.

This is a self-inflicted wound in more ways than one. It was clear back in February 2015 that Sorbara should have been asked to go. That’s when the head of Elections Ontario, Greg Essensa, reported that in his opinion the actions of Sorbara and a Liberal fundraiser constituted an “apparent contravention” of anti-bribery provisions in the election law.

That’s the moment when Wynne should have put the reputation of her party ahead of personal loyalty and asked Sorbara to step down until the matter was cleared up.

Instead, she stuck with her aide and made matters worse last month by entrusting the entire 2018 Liberal re-election campaign to her, naming her CEO and director of it. Rather than distancing herself from potential scandal, she moved even closer.


The timing could hardly be worse as the Liberals now head into two byelections scheduled for Nov. 17 in the ridings of Niagara West-Glanbrook and Ottawa-Vanier.

Sorbara now stands accused by the Ontario Provincial Police of allegedly trying to bribe Energy Minister Glenn Thibeault to jump from the federal NDP to the provincial Liberals to run in Sudbury, and of offering former Liberal candidate Andrew Olivier a job in exchange for dropping out to clear the path for Thibeault.

Wynne has always argued she would not ask Sorbara to “step aside based on allegations I do not believe to be true.” She maintains that the conversations with Olivier were only aimed at exploring his future with the Liberals, while Thibeault denies he was offered any inducements

That may well be; Sorbara has not been found guilty of anything. But in politics respect can be squandered through optics alone. And now there are real charges involved, not just suspicions.

Wynne ran on a promise of winning back respect and credibility for the Ontario Liberals. She should have done more to distance her party from threats to its reputation, especially when the warning signs were so clear.

https://www.thestar.com/opinion/editorials/2016/11/02/premier-kathleen-wynne-should-have-asked-aide-to-step-down-much-earlier-editorial.html
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 6711
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votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Mon Nov 14, 2016 4:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( this is one of the worst pieces of rubbish I have seen written about provincial politics in Ontario in a while , I still cannot get over it , read his bit about there being no criminal charges against wynne or her team ? ok but her former chief of staff was charged with bribery under the elections act .

could you imagine the outrage from this same paper if Rob Ford or Mike Harris had been charged with bribery under the elections act ? the coverage would be fierce and non-stop , but for wynne its not even an issue ? and even trying to go as far is to claim there are no charges against her,
but the author is right about one thing there is a new history about corruption in Ontario politics and Kathleen wynne and her team and leading it )



A new history of corruption in Ontario politics: Cohn


Donald Trump’s talent for truthiness has spread. Democracy in America has come to Ontario.


André Marin, ab ove, is merely the tip of the Tory spear. Progressive Conservative leader Patrick Brown and his caucus have seized on the so-called corruption narrative as the path of least resistance, writes Martin Regg Cohn.

André Marin, ab ove, is merely the tip of the Tory spear. Progressive Conservative leader Patrick Brown and his caucus have seized on the so-called corruption narrative as the path of least resistance, writes Martin Regg Cohn. (Darren Calabrese / THE CANADIAN PRESS file photo)



By Martin Regg CohnOntario Politics Columnist

Sat., Nov. 12, 2016



History records that when Alexis de Tocqueville researched his classic 1835 study, Democracy in America, he also made a side trip to Upper Canada.

He never wrote a postscript on what would one day become Ontario. So herewith, a word on how our own provincial politics are being influenced by democracy in America today.

There is nothing close to Donald Trump at Queen’s Park — not the bigotry, racism, misogyny or coarseness. But his talent for truthiness has spread beyond America’s borders, and is making a side trip to Ontario.

The president-elect well understands what de Tocqueville might describe as the essence of democracy today: Choosing the lesser of two evils.

While Trump may have seemed the devil incarnate to some, he proved devilishly clever at out-demonizing his opponent — by delegitimizing and criminalizing her. Making her more evil.


Like any populist, he excelled at pressing people’s buttons — an electorate eager to lap up his conspiracy theories, but also a media ready to act as an echo chamber until it was too late; and a police force playing into his hands.

Who needs attack ads when you can merely harness an unwitting police as your attack dog, and an uncritical media as your lap dog? By the time journalists woke up to their duty to fact-check — and context-check — they had already done Trumps’ bidding.

Why is Ontario vulnerable to Trump’s truthiness?


Let’s look at how a Progressive Conservative candidate is casting the premier as a criminal, akin to Hillary Clinton, in a coming byelection.

“My name is André Marin. I’m your Ontario PC candidate in Ottawa-Vanier. But you might know me as a former Ontario ombudsman . . . and that is exactly why I had to take a stand against Kathleen Wynne,” he writes in an email appeal for money sent last Tuesday — voting day in America.

“I’m an anti-corruption and ethics expert and this is one of the most unscrupulous and unethical governments in Ontario’s history. It’s one of the worst cases I’ve seen in my career.”

Let’s ponder that historical reference for a moment. What is Wynne charged with that supposedly surpasses the span of history since the time of de Tocqueville’s visit to Upper Canada?

In fact, there are no criminal charges against the premier or her team. There are no charges of any kind against Wynne, her cabinet or Liberal MPPs.

What, then, can Marin mean? The star PC candidate is referring to recent charges under the Elections Act — provincial offences, not criminal — alleging bribery by Wynne’s former deputy chief of staff, Pat Sorbara, in another byelection nearly two years ago.

I’ve argued elsewhere that the OPP have overreached, but as a lawyer Marin has the benefit of legal training stressing that an accused is innocent until proven guilty. You know, like former treasurer Greg Sorbara, who was wrongly named in a search warrant by the RCMP; or then-finance minister Ralph Goodale whom the RCMP probed at the behest of the NDP ahead of the 2006 federal election. Both were later exonerated — and the RCMP excoriated (not unlike the FBI’s ill-timed intervention in the US election).

Ontario’s NDP, taking a page from their federal cousins, demanded the probe that led the OPP to lay charges against Pat Sorbara. Our independent courts will have the final say on this case, but the independence of the office of the ombudsman has been diminished by Marin’s reckless partisanship so soon after leaving his job last year.

Until MPPs from all parties refused to renew his term, Marin served as a supposedly non-partisan officer of the legislature. Impartiality was part of the job description, yet Marin started trolling and taunting the Liberals on Twitter, filed lawsuits against both the government and the legislature, and now seeks revenge by running in the upcoming byelection.

Marin is merely the tip of the Tory spear. PC leader Patrick Brown and his caucus have seized on the so-called corruption narrative as the path of least resistance, but it may prove to be a dead end, and possibly self-defeating.

Whenever Brown plays the bribery card, the media may well point out that his PCs gave MPP Garfield Dunlop a job at party headquarters immediately after he relinquished elected office so that the leader could run in his riding in a byelection last year. Bribery, or business as usual?

And whenever NDP Leader Andrea Horwath talks darkly about criminality — as she did in her failed 2014 campaign, at the expense of privatization concerns — the media may remind voters of how she quietly dissuaded star MPP Jagmeet Singh from seeking federal office last year by appointing him deputy leader. An elegant NDP inducement?

It’s not that Brown and Horwath are guilty of bribery — merely hypocrisy. Crooked Kathleen, we give you Crooked Patrick and Crooked Andrea.

When the dust (and dirt) settles, Ontarians may wonder why the opposition parties didn’t spend more time on the issues people worry about: energy costs, climate change, health care and privatization. For that, we can thank democracy in America, which has spread, all these years later, to Ontario.



Martin Regg Cohn’s political column appears Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. mcohn@thestar.ca , Twitter: @reggcohn

https://www.thestar.com/news/queenspark/2016/11/12/a-new-history-of-corruption-in-ontario-politics-cohn.html
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 09, 2017 8:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( wynne's liberal government is so corrupt there is actually going to be 2 trials against it taking place at the same time this fall , but don't understand why its taken these cases so long to get this far )


Two Ontario Liberal trials set for September


Canadian Press

Wednesday, February 8th, 2017



SUDBURY, Ont. – Two trials involving charges against Ontario Liberals are set to take place simultaneously this fall, setting the stage for possible verdicts just months ahead of the June 2018 election.

Lawyers for two Liberals facing Election Act bribery charges appeared in court Wednesday in Sudbury, Ont., as trial dates were set for Sept. 7-22, Oct. 10-13 and 23-27.

That means the trial of Pat Sorbara, the premier’s former deputy chief of staff, and Liberal fundraiser Gerry Lougheed will begin just four days before the start of another major political trial in Toronto.

David Livingston and Laura Miller, who were then-premier Dalton McGuinty’s chief of staff and deputy chief of staff, face charges of breach of trust, and mischief in relation to data and misuse of a computer system to commit the offence of mischief.

They were charged after a police investigation into the deletion of emails about the Liberals’ decision to cancel two gas plants prior to the 2011 election, at a cost of up to $1.1 billion.

Both Miller and Livingston have denied the charges. Their trial is scheduled the trial for six weeks starting Sept. 11.

Unlike the gas plants trial, the Sudbury trial is not on criminal charges, rather Sorbara faces two bribery charges under the Election Act and Lougheed faces one. Lougheed had been charged criminally, with one count of counselling an offence not committed and one count of unlawfully influencing or negotiating appointments, but those charges were stayed last year.

The charges stem from allegations the pair offered a would-be candidate a job or appointment to get him to step aside in a 2015 byelection in Sudbury so that Glenn Thibeault could run for the provincial Liberals. He was then a New Democrat MP and is now the energy minister.

Sorbara and Lougheed both deny the charges.

June 27 was also set as a confirmation hearing to make sure all of the parties are ready for a trial to start in September.

The Liberals are also still under investigation by the Ontario Provincial Police, who are looking into financial irregularities at the Ornge air ambulance service, and investigating complaints from Trillium Power Wind Corp. about the alleged destruction of documents in a lawsuit it filed against the province.

– with files from CJMX in Sudbury

http://ipolitics.ca/2017/02/08.....september/
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Feb 09, 2017 8:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Two corruption trials for Liberals will overlap


One trial is linked to a byelection in Sudbury, the other to the cancelled gas plants in Oakville and Mississauga.


Dalton McGuinty's former chief of staff, David Livingston, faces breach of trust and mischief charges in the alleged deletion of documents in relation to two cancelled natural gas-fired power plants in Oakville and Mississauga before the 2011 election.


By Rob FergusonQueen's Park Bureau

Wed., Feb. 8, 2017



Two court cases of alleged corruption involving Queen’s Park Liberals will overlap with the setting of a Sept. 7 trial date in the Sudbury byelection bribery scandal.

Four days later, on Sept. 11, a previously scheduled and separate prosecution unfolds in a Toronto courtroom on criminal charges against two top aides to ex-premier Dalton McGuinty over accusations of deleted documents in the $1 billion cancellation of two gas plants in 2011.

Both trials are slated to wrap up in late October, just eight months before the next provincial election in June 2018. The gas plants case begins the day MPPs return to Queen’s Park from their summer break.

Premier Kathleen Wynne’s former deputy chief of staff, Patricia Sorbara, will be in a Sudbury court Sept. 7 on lesser Elections Act bribery charges with local party power broker Gerry Lougheed, a wealthy funeral home owner.

“We’re all ready to proceed,” Sorbara lawyer Brian Greenspan said Wednesday after the date was set. “This was the first available date for all parties involved.”

Premier Kathleen Wynne’s former deputy chief of staff, Patricia Sorbara, will be in a Sudbury court Sept. 7 to face Elections Act bribery charges. )


Ontario Provincial Police allege Sorbara and Lougheed offered jobs to get a would-be Liberal candidate to step aside for Wynne’s preferred choice — now Energy Minister Glen Thibeault — in a February 2015 byelection.

Lawyers for both have repeatedly maintained their clients have done nothing wrong.


Gerry Lougheed, a wealthy funeral home owner in Sudbury, is facing Elections Act bribery charges.


The investigation has had some twists and turns. While Lougheed was originally charged under the Criminal Code, Sorbara was not. Last April, that criminal charge against Lougheed was stayed, leaving him in legal limbo.

“We are disappointed that the police, having originally charged Gerry criminally, only to have the charges stayed by the Crown, have now laid charges under the Elections Act,” Lougheed lawyer Michael Lacy told the Star in November when the new charge was announced.

Elections Act charges are in a lower, non-criminal category of violations known as provincial offences, where penalties include fines of up to $25,000 and maximum jail sentences of two years less a day.


One-time Dalton McGuinty deputy Laura Miller faces breach of trust and mischief charges in the alleged deletion of documents in relation to two cancelled natural gas-fired power plants.

One-time Dalton McGuinty deputy Laura Miller faces breach of trust and mischief charges in the alleged deletion of documents in relation to two cancelled natural gas-fired power plants. (FACEBOOK PHOTO)


In the Toronto case, one-time McGuinty chief of staff David Livingston and his deputy Laura Miller face breach of trust and mischief charges in the alleged deletion of documents in relation to two cancelled natural gas-fired power plants in Oakville and Mississauga before the 2011 election.

Miller is now executive director of the British Columbia Liberal Party, helming re-election efforts for Premier Christy Clark this spring.

Lawyers for her and Livingston have also maintained their clients are innocent. McGuinty, who left office in 2013, was not a subject of the probe and co-operated with the OPP investigation.

“Mr. Livingston is looking forward to having this matter resolved once and for all, and he is confident that at trial he will be cleared of any wrongdoing,” lawyer Fredrick Schumann of Stockwoods LLP said when the trial date was set in May.

Miller had initially stepped down from her post with the B.C. Liberals to organize her defence when charged, but was reinstated in March in a move Clark called “the fair and right approach, one that respects the fundamental principle that every person is innocent unless proven otherwise.”

The lawyer for Miller is Scott Hutchison of Henein-Hutchison, the same firm that successfully defended former CBC host Jian Ghomeshi in his sexual assault trial.

Miller has a FundRazr page online raising money toward her legal fees. It has generated $78,111 from 114 donors toward her $100,000 goal

https://www.thestar.com/news/queenspark/2017/02/08/two-corruption-trials-for-liberals-will-overlap.html
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Feb 09, 2017 9:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( these trials also conveniently occur far too late in the election cycle for there to be time for a leadership race and selection of a new liberal leader . the pollster say the sault ste marie by election is likely one of the last oppurtunities for wynne to step down and there'd still be enough time for a leadership race , although she seems poised to delay it long enough that opening may also close )



Sault Ste. Marie byelection could be last opening for Wynne to step down, pollster says

Ainslie Cruickshank

Tuesday, January 31st, 2017



The byelection in Sault Ste. Marie could be the last opportunity for Kathleen Wynne to step down as leader of the Ontario Liberal Party ahead of the 2018 election — something she says she won’t do despite her dismal poll numbers.

Pollsters are divided about whether Wynne should step down, but there is some agreement that the party’s window for making a change is closing fast.

“The best thing she could do for her party and quite likely for the province is to step down and let someone else take the helm and be the new messenger,” said Quito Maggi, president and CEO...

http://ipolitics.ca/2017/01/31.....ster-says/
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Is Wynne the most corrupt premier in Ontario's history ?

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