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RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Apr 14, 2016 6:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Manitobans deeply divided on PST: Poll




New poll shows Manitobans divided on PST



Jeff Keele on a new poll that shows Manitobans are divided on the idea around the Provincial Sales Tax.


Poll shows Manitobans split on PST


A new Probe Research poll shows 48 per cent of Manitobans believe the PST should stay the same.



Cameron MacLean, CTV Winnipeg
Published Monday, April 11, 2016 2:00AM CST
Last Updated Monday, April 11, 2016 5:54PM CST


The NDP government’s decision to raise the Provincial Sales Tax one percentage point continues to divide Manitobans, a new poll suggests.

For every person who thinks the PST should stay eight per cent, there is another person who wants to see it lowered.

In a poll conducted by Probe Research Inc. on behalf of CTV Winnipeg and The Winnipeg Free Press, 48 per cent of respondents said the PST should remain the same, and 44 per cent wanted it lowered.




PST
For every person who thinks the PST should stay eight per cent, there is another person who wants to see it lowered.



PST opinion poll
In a poll conducted by Probe Research Inc. on behalf of CTV Winnipeg and The Winnipeg Free Press, 48 per cent of respondents said the PST should remain the same, and 44 per cent wanted it lowered.

With a margin of error of +/- 3.1 per cent, those groups are almost evenly split.

Another six per cent said they were unsure, and two per cent wanted to see it increased.

The split among poll respondents ran not only along party lines, but also education.

NDP supporters were more likely (66 per cent) to support keeping the PST at eight per cent, while Progressive Conservative and Liberal supporters were more likely to support lowering it (55 and 53 per cent respectively).

An equal percentage of PC and Liberal supporters (40 per cent) favoured keeping the PST at eight per cent.

Those with a post-secondary degree were also more likely to support keeping the PST the same; 56 per cent supported an eight per cent PST, while only 35 per cent of those with Grade 12 or less favoured keeping it.

Probe surveyed 1,000 Manitoba adults between March 28 and April 4.

The provincial election is April 19.

http://winnipeg.ctvnews.ca/man.....-1.2853248
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 6733
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 15, 2016 7:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Voting for 'none of the above' an option in Manitoba Elections

Manitoba is one of only three provinces where voters can formally decline a ballot

By Jacques Marcoux, CBC News Posted: Apr 15, 2016 4:00 AM CT| Last Updated: Apr 15, 2016 4:00 AM CT

A voter exits a polling station in the 2011 provincial election in Manitoba.



How would you vote if come election day you find that none of the candidates running in your constituency represent your values or you simply don't feel inspired by any of the parties?

If you're like Elmwood resident Sara Calnek, you would cast a ballot for "none of the above" in this year's provincial election.

"Candidates in my area don't really represent what I represent, so I feel like it's my only option and it's one that actually counts for something and that's really important for me," said Calnek.

Under Manitoba's Election Act, voters can exercise their voting right and have their vote count as part of the overall turnout, by opting to officially "decline" a ballot. In the 2011 provincial election, 440 Manitobans declined their ballots.

sara-calnek-vote
Sara Calnek from Winnipeg is among the few Manitobans to have declined a ballot. (Courtesy: Sara Calnek)

Calnek says she has declined a ballot in past elections as well, when a friend who was aware the option to decline a ballot suggested she try that approach in light of her dissatisfaction with the slate of candidates.

Making a statement

Elections Manitoba says declined ballots are counted as valid votes, whereas rejected or spoiled ballots are considered invalid since they are considered to be marked improperly and therefore are not reflected in the overall voter turnout.

"The process [to decline a ballot] is just to get a ballot as you would if you were planning to vote for a candidate, and you take the ballot behind the screen an instead of putting your "X" beside a candidate's name, you write 'declined' across the front of your ballot. Then you would just refold your ballot and take it back," explained Alison Mitchell, spokesperson for Elections Manitoba.
■Manitoba election: NDP, PC and Liberal leaders spar in final debate
■Fort Rouge hosts feisty all-party debate Wednesday

"It's a way for people who do want to participate, but don't feel that they have, that there's a candidate that truly represents their interests. So they're making a statement in a sense. They don't want to pass up the opportunity to vote, because it's important to them have their voice heard," she said.

Manitoba is one of only three province in Canada where voters can decline a ballot during provincial elections.

In the last provincial elections in Ontario in 2014, an unprecedented 30,000 voters formally declined a ballot. Last year, during Alberta's provincial election, just over 2,000 voters opted to support no specific candidate.


Voting for "none of the above" in past Manitoba elections:
■2011: 440 declined ballots
■2007: 590 declined ballots
■2003: 426 declined ballots
■1999: 1,129 declined ballots
■1995: 16 declined ballots

Source: Elections Manitoba historical results



Surveys suggest many eligible voters don't like choices

Post-election survey commissioned by Elections Manitoba suggests that there has been an increase of non-voters who cite not liking any of the candidate options as a reason for not participating.

In 2003, post-election surveys found that 13 per cent of non-voters said they lacked trust in candidates, didn`t like any of the available choices or were disillusioned. Following the 2011 election, that number jumped to 22 per cent of respondents.

'Legitimate protest'

Political analyst Christopher Adams says that when eligible voters do not participate in the electoral process it`s impossible to interpret motives for their inaction.

"Does it indicate dissatisfaction with the political process, or does it mean that people are apathetic, or that people are facing certain barriers to getting to the voting station?" he said.

Adams says declining a ballot is a legitimate way by which a voter can protest a facet of the election, but he feels it hasn't yielding satisfactory results.

"We still don't know why someone has declined his or her ballot ...so I think it's not a good measure of what it was seeking to measure or indicate," he said.


Steps for declining a ballot according to the Manitoba Elections Act

STEP 1: Voting officer gives ballot to voter

STEP 2: Voter marks ballot
■The voter must take the ballot directly to the voting compartment and, without delay, mark the ballot ■(a) by placing an "X" in the space provided for that purpose beside the name of the candidate of his or her choice; or
■(b) by writing "declined" on the front of the ballot.


STEP 3: Voter returns ballot to voting officer

STEP 4: Voting officer examines ballot
■Without unfolding the ballot, the voting officer must confirm that it is the same ballot that was provided to the voter by examining his or her initials.

STEP 5: Voting officer or voter puts ballot in box

Source: Excerpts from the Manitoba Elections Act

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/.....-1.3536349
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
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votes: 3
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 15, 2016 7:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Unprecedented lies from NDP
May as well claim the Tories are going to drown puppies, ban hockey and cancel Christmas


tom-brodbeck
By Tom Brodbeck, Winnipeg Sun
First posted: Thursday, April 14, 2016 05:51 PM CDT




It's hard to imagine a political party that has lied to voters as much as the NDP has in this election campaign.

Oh sure, politics always comes with heavy doses of spin, obfuscation, misleading statements and yes, downright lies in some cases.

It's an unfortunate and entirely unnecessary part of the political process. And it's probably why so many people tune out politics, and in some cases don't vote at all.

However, the relentless, daily onslaught of outright lies that have come from the New Democratic Party and its leader Greg Selinger in this campaign is unprecedented.

I've never seen anything like it. The degree to which this party has intentionally put out false information about the Progressive Conservative party is something we've never seen before in Manitoba politics.

Sure, political parties trade barbs, have disputes over the facts, clash over ideology and engage in name-calling. And yes, sometimes they lie.

But I've never seen the kind of daily, sustained level of fabrication that we've seen from the NDP in this campaign.

They claim every day, for example, that the Tories are planning to cut $500 million from front-line services, including schools and hospitals. The Tories have never said or even suggested that. It's not in their campaign material. It's not anywhere. It's a number fabricated by the NDP who believe if they say it over and over, people will believe it.

The NDP also claim the Tories want to bring in two-tier health care so that Manitobans would get health services based on the size of their wallets. No they haven't. They haven't even hinted at it. Why would they? They'd never get elected if they did. Nothing they've ever said in speeches, campaign material or in the media has ever suggested they are remotely interested in bringing in two-tier health care. It's a complete and utter lie.

The NDP say the Tories are planning to slash infrastructure spending by 25%. No they're not. What the Tories have pledged is to spend at least $1 billion a year on infrastructure. That's more than the NDP have spent on infrastructure on average in recent years. The Selinger government spent $867 million on infrastructure in 2013-14 and $1.04 billion the following year. The forecast for infrastructure spending in 2015-16 is $1.1 billion. How is a plan to spend "at least" $1 billion a year on infrastructure a 25% cut? It's not. It's a complete falsehood.

The NDP are telling voters the Tories would "fire" teachers and nurses, "just like they did in the 1990s," which of course they never did. The NDP just make this stuff up. They may as well claim the Tories are going to drown puppies, ban hockey and cancel Christmas. It's really that absurd.

But it's more than that.

It's also immoral. Is this what we should be teaching our kids? How to lie and cheat in life to get ahead? Because that's the message NDP candidates like Sharon Blady, Deanne Crothers and Wab Kinew are sending to families and kids -- that's it's OK to smear people and make up things about them in order to win.

Elections should be about debating ideas and policies. If the NDP don't like the policies the Tories are actually advancing, like reducing the PST to 7% within their mandate or amalgamating the East Side Road Authority into an existing government department, then debate that. Tell us why you disagree with those policies.

Challenge your opponents and debate their policies. But don't lie and make stuff up about them.

It's repulsive and it's not the message we should be sending to our children.
http://www.winnipegsun.com/201.....s-from-ndp
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Apr 15, 2016 7:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( Elizabeth may is campaigning in the provincial election to try and help the greens , I'm really not sure this will matter much the odds of the green's winning a Manitoba seat remain slim )

Elizabeth May in Winnipeg to give Manitoba Green Party a boost


CBC News Posted: Apr 15, 2016 4:00 AM CT| Last Updated: Apr 15, 2016 4:00 AM CT

Federal Green Party leader Elizabeth May is visiting Winnipeg on Friday April 15 to help support the Manitoba Green Party on the campaign trail in the provincial election.




The leader of the Green Party of Canada is in Winnipeg on Friday giving the Manitoba Greens a boost on the campaign trail.

Elizabeth May will be making several appearance with James Beddome, the leader of the Manitoba Green Party, about the importance of electing Green MLAs to the Manitoba Legislature.

"She's a very inspirational woman and very knowledgeable woman and I do look up to her," Beddome said.

"I think having her here is important, I think that fact she's the only federal party leader that saw fit to come in and visit Manitoba during the general election shows the Greens do care about Manitoba," Beddome said.

Beddome, who's running in Fort Garry-Riverview, said he's been getting a lot more recognition and support from people at the door since the televised leaders debate on Tuesday night.

James Beddome
Manitoba Green Party leader James Beddome is running in Fort Garry-Riverview. The Green Party has 30 candidates running in the Manitoba General election. (Green Party of Manitoba)

Tory, Green Party leaders score big in Manitoba election debate: poll


"The reaction especially after the debate is really strong, a lot of people are recognizing me and confirming that they already voted for me in advance polls and really anything is possible, so I can see us putting several greens into the legislature," said Beddome.

He says having a Federal Green Party leader visiting Winnipeg during an election will help his campaign.

"I've been hearing left right and centre at the door from people that were voting NDP, people that were voting PC and people that were voting Liberal and people that were not going to vote at all that are coming our way at the very last little bit here and I think we can make this final push," Beddome said.

Elizabeth May will be making her first stop with James Beddome at the University of Winnipeg at noon on Friday for a student rally about poverty.

May and Beddome will also make an announcement at the Manitoba Green Party campaign headquarters on Portage Avenue about what the Green Party could do for Manitoba if elected.


The Manitoba Green Party has 30 candidates running in this election.


http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/.....-1.3536457
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Apr 15, 2016 7:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

April 14, 2016 7:17 pm

Manitoba run by union: PC leader Brian Pallister


By Steve Lambert The Canadian Press



WINNIPEG — Manitoba Progressive Conservative Leader Brian Pallister told a business audience Thursday the province is being run by the Canadian Union of Public Employees — something that will change if his party wins Tuesday’s provincial election.

“I believe in the rights of workers to organize. I believe in collective bargaining. But I do not believe in a province that’s run by CUPE,” Pallister said during the last leaders’ debate before the election, in front of some 500 members of the Winnipeg Chamber of Commerce.




“That has been what’s being going on for far too long here in Manitoba. It has to stop.”

The comments — the only real drama during a 90-minute debate in which the leaders stuck closely to talking points — were quickly condemned by Pallister’s opponents.

“I think we should definitely respect that organizations are organizations but there are individual people who are a part of these organizations who are Manitobans and they matter to us, so it’s quite insulting” Liberal Leader Rana Bokhari said.

RELATED: Campaign promise tracker for the Manitoba election

“Mr. Pallister always looks for one person or one group that he can punish or make a victim, and he demonstrated that again today,” Selinger told reporters afterward.

Pallister, who is leading in opinion polls, pointed to the role CUPE played in helping Premier Greg Selinger survive an internal coup last year. CUPE had hundreds of delegates at the leadership convention that saw Selinger hold on to his job by a 33-vote margin.

CUPE and other unions have helped tilt labour laws against businesses, Pallister said.

RELATED: Pallister wins election debate, according to poll

Pallister repeated that a Tory government would no longer require all workers on large government projects to be covered by a collective labour agreement.

The Tories would also end automatic certification in union drives and allow secret-ballot votes in all cases. Currently, if a union gets 65 per cent or more of employees in a workplace to sign membership cards, certification is automatic and no vote is held.

The changes, Pallister said, would put employers and unions on an equal footing.

Selinger said the current laws are fair to both sides.

“The key is to make sure that it’s a fair process and that people have a chance to make a decent living.”

http://globalnews.ca/news/2639.....pallister/
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Apr 15, 2016 1:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the latest nonsense from the ndp in Manitoba centres around Brian Pallister's vacation time spent in costa rica , apparently he owns a vacation property there and went there several times when legislature not sitting , I don't think there is any evidence he wasn't doing his job though , he just liked to get away now and then , should that really be an issue for people ? )


Manitoba PC leader responds to Costa Rica travel criticism

Brian Pallister has spent 18.2% of his time in the Central American country since being elected

CBC News Posted: Apr 15, 2016 11:00 AM CT| Last Updated: Apr 15, 2016 11:00 AM CT

Manitoba Progressive Conservative Leader Brian Pallister spoke with reporters Friday about the 240 days he spent in or travelling to Costa Rica since being elected in 2012.


Manitoba Progressive Conservative Leader Brian Pallister spoke with reporters on Friday about criticism over the amount of time he has spent travelling to or in Costa Rica since being elected in as an MLA in 2012.

His comments come just days before the provincial election on April 19. The latest poll data shows his party is in position to win a majority.
■Brian Pallister spends nearly 1 in 5 days of his time in Costa Rica, travel logs show
■Brian Pallister's Costa Rica travel records denounced by Manitoba party leaders

CBC News reported on Thursday that Pallister, who represents the constituency of Fort Whyte, has spent a total of 240 days either en route to or in Costa Rica — that works out to roughly 18.2 per cent of his time as a member of the Manitoba Legislature.

None of Pallister's trips to Costa Rica, where he has a vacation home, occurred when the legislature was sitting.

Pallister did not dispute CBC's reporting.

He said he did not publicly disclose his 15 trips to the Central American country because he was trying to "safeguard the protection" of his family and balance that with reporters "knowing where I am all the time."

"I do have an obligation, I feel it's an obligation, to protect my family," said Pallister.

In interviews with the Winnipeg Free Press Pallister did not accurately disclose where he was on two occasions. During the 2014 Assiniboine River flood — a state of emergency disaster — Pallister was on a 14-day stay in Costa Rica, but he told the Free Press he was at a family wedding in Alberta.

Then in an interview published in the Free Press April 2, when asked where he went when he last left Canada, Pallister said he was in North Dakota when in fact his last trip was to Costa Rica.

"I got it wrong," said Pallister on Friday when asked whether he should apologize for the inconsistencies.

Pallister added he travelled twice to western Manitoba before the flood in 2014 and once after.

"It isn't a case of not loving or caring for the people there," he said.

'I work hard every day'

Pallister defended the time spent in Costa Rica and said he regularly works 60 hours a week.

He and his wife purchased a home in Costa Rica after saving for "three decades" and it was intended to be a retirement property, said Pallister.

"Somehow that retirement thing got put on hold and another thing came up … the most important opportunity I've ever had in my life," he said.

The PC leader said he often reads and writes speeches in Costa Rica and is in touch with his party in Manitoba while away.

"I spend an extensive amount of time in contact with my office while I'm there, which would be a point of disagreement with my wife," said Pallister.

"I work hard every day," he said.

Both Liberal Leader Rana Bokhari and NDP Leader Greg Selinger have criticized Pallister for the number of days he has been away.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/.....-1.3537489
RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Apr 16, 2016 7:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

PCs approaching 'super majority' territory: Poll

Brian Pallister
A new poll by Mainstreet Research for Postmedia pegs overall support for the PCs at 55 per cent among decided and leaning voters. (File image)

Cameron MacLean, CTV Winnipeg
Published Saturday, April 16, 2016 5:00AM CST



Signs point to a Progressive Conservative majority government as the party appears to be building steam heading into Tuesday’s election.

A new poll by Mainstreet Research for Postmedia pegs overall support for the PCs at 55 per cent among decided and leaning voters. That’s five percentage points higher than the Mainstreet poll on April 5.

With that increase in support, Mainstreet says the PCs are approaching “super majority” territory.



Mainstreet poll
A new poll by Mainstreet Research for Postmedia pegs overall support for the PCs at 55 per cent among decided and leaning voters. That’s five percentage points higher than the Mainstreet poll on April 5.



Mainstreet poll
Support for the NDP remains highest in Winnipeg, at 30 per cent, compared to 18 per cent outside of Winnipeg. Those numbers are still far behind the PCs, which have 47 per cent support within Winnipeg and 68 per cent in the rest of Manitoba.

Among decided voters, the PCs have 46 per cent support, with eight per cent of undecided voters saying they are leaning towards the PCs.

The most recent poll surveyed 1,809 people on April 14, asking them who they would vote for if the election were held that day. It has a margin of error of +/- 2.3 per cent, 19 times out of 20.

The NDP remained a distant second with 26 per cent, a two percentage point increase since the last poll.

The Liberals continued their slide in the polls, falling six points to 11 per cent. The Manitoba Greens remained unchanged at nine per cent.

Mainstreet President Quito Maggi gave a blunt assessment of the reason for why this election has gone the way it has.

“This election was lost the day (Premier) Greg Selinger decided to run,” he said in the report.

He pointed to a Mainstreet poll conducted in November 2014 after five NDP caucus members broke ranks and called for the premier to step down. Mainstreet asked voters whether they thought Selinger should resign, and found that 57 per cent agreed, with 45 per cent of respondents completely agreeing.

Those numbers closely match the current rates of support for the PCs overall and among decided voters.

A sign of weakness for the PCs, and a sign of hope for the NDP and Liberals, is a fall in support among undecided leaning voters. They now lean more heavily towards the NDP (11 per cent) and Liberals (12 per cent), with the PCs in third (8 per cent).

Maggi said this indicates the PCs might be approaching their maximum level of support.

The NDP also showed a significant increase in strong support, from 63 per cent to 76 per cent, indicating their support likely won’t crumble in the days before the election.

Nonetheless, the NDP shouldn’t count on Liberal support breaking in their favour just before the election like it has in the past.

“The desire for change in Manitoba is so strong in fact, so disliked is Greg Selinger that the collapsing Liberal vote went overwhelmingly to the PCs throughout the election,” said Maggi.

Support for the NDP remains highest in Winnipeg, at 30 per cent, compared to 18 per cent outside of Winnipeg. Those numbers are still far behind the PCs, which have 47 per cent support within Winnipeg and 68 per cent in the rest of Manitoba.

Support for the Liberals sits at 12 per cent within Winnipeg and 10 per cent in the rest of Manitoba. The Greens have 11 per cent support within Winnipeg and four per cent in the rest of Manitoba.

Due to smaller sample sizes, the margin of error is larger for Winnipeg and the rest of Manitoba, at +/- 3.09 per cent and 3.45 per cent respectively.


http://winnipeg.ctvnews.ca/pcs.....-1.2861809
RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Apr 16, 2016 7:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Advanced voting numbers are up for this year's provincial election

Advance voting
Elections Manitoba says it expects a 30 per cent increase in advanced voters this election.


CTV Winnipeg
Published Friday, April 15, 2016 12:51PM CST



Elections Manitoba says it expects a 30 per cent increase in advanced voters this election.

About 80,000 people had cast early ballots as of Thursday night. That's 2,000 more than the total number of advanced voters in the 2011 provincial election.

While Elections Manitoba says a high advanced voter turnout doesn't automatically mean a higher overall turnout, it says an increase in early voters this year was expected.




Related Stories

Infrastructure tops list of election issues in new poll


It takes about 1,000 employees to run the province’s 300 early voting stations. In total, an election is run with the help of about 10,000 people.

Elections Manitoba said it scheduled extra staff at the advanced polling stations this year.

It attributes the increase in early voters to an increased awareness.

Manitobans have two more days to cast an advanced vote.

The provincial election takes place on April 19.

http://winnipeg.ctvnews.ca/adv.....-1.2861073
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 6733
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 16, 2016 2:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( Elizabeth may has made the bold prediction of a green victory in Winnipeg ? is this really a possibility or she talking crazy ? )


Elizabeth May: Greens will take Wolseley


Winnipeg Sun

First posted: Friday, April 15, 2016 03:49 PM CDT | Updated: Saturday, April 16, 2016 12:35 AM CDT



Elizabeth May says this is the year the Greens claim a seat in the Manitoba legislature.

The national Green leader was at Wolseley candidate David Nickarz’s campaign office Friday to stump for the only candidate who has a chance to change the district’s 26 consecutive years of NDP government.

“This election, 2016, is the year the Greens make the breakthrough into the Manitoba legislature,” May said.

She quipped that she was the only national party leader to make an appearance this provincial election, even though her national party has no legal ties to the Manitoba Greens.

“Here in Wolseley, ground zero for Green victory, David Nickarz has a great chance to be the first Green MLA in Manitoba,” she said, has he came up to hug her — just the first of many embraces at the media event.

May emphasized that being the only Green MP — and with lone Green MLAs in legislatures across Canada — she’s learned how effective working with other parties can be.

“Good ideas presented in a co-operative respectful fashion get picked up by other parties and then they become law,” she said. “There’s not a single person in the media, or a citizen of those provinces (with Green MLAs) who would say that one Green MLA makes no difference. Coast to coast, Canadians who have elected Greens are really happy they did.”

Manitoba party leader James Beddome quipped that they would even “work with, shudder, a PC government.”

May said while Beddome would make a “wonderful premier,” their best shot is in Wolseley — where Beddome placed second with 19% of the vote in 2011.

“The fear factor is the only thing to worry about here,” May said, asking residents to vote their conscience instead of listening to polls. “If you’re looking for a way to make a difference with your vote, your only strategic vote is to vote Green.”

“We’ve provided an alternative in Wolseley. We’ve done the work,” Nickarz said, noting he’s knocked on 3,000 doors himself. He said his first act in the legislature would be to introduce a private members’ bill for the Greens’ Guaranteed Annual Income (GAI) plan, followed by a green building fund and carbon tax.

Beddome admitted that the GAI income of $6,300 is “modest” but argued it would complement existing programs and cut poverty rates nearly in half.

Nickarz promised to work with whatever party takes power to set real goals to fight climate change. “They set the goal so far in the future that there’s no consequence to it,” he said.

Yet he — and May — kept the tone positive.

“You lucky voters,” May concluded. “Voters of Wolseley are the ones who will have the very happiest day after the election when they realize they were the only voters to make history” this election, she said.

May and Nickarz also visited seniors at Lions Manor and, along with Beddome, participated in a Make Poverty History rally Friday.

NDPer Rob Altemeyer is the Wolseley incumbent.


http://www.winnipegsun.com/201.....e-wolseley
RCO





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PostPosted: Sun Apr 17, 2016 2:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Manitoba NDP on the ropes heading into provincial election

NDP leader Greg Selinger speaks
NDP leader Greg Selinger speaks during a NDP 2016 provincial election rally in Winnipeg, Wednesday, March 16, 2016. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods)

The Canadian Press
Published Sunday, April 17, 2016 10:14AM EDT
Last Updated Sunday, April 17, 2016 10:20AM EDT


WINNIPEG -- One of Canada's two remaining NDP governments finds itself on the ropes as it heads into an election Tuesday with polls suggesting Manitoba voters are ready to turn to the Progressive Conservatives.

Premier Greg Selinger's New Democrats have been in power for 16 years, but have faced voter anger since they raised the provincial sales tax in 2013. That broke a previous campaign promise and sidestepped a requirement under the province's balanced budget law to hold a referendum on tax increases.

Surveys in recent months continue to suggest the NDP are 20 points or more back of the Tories and have lost almost half of their popular support from the last election.




Related Stories

Manitoba NDP promises more deficit spending in dying days of campaign


Party leaders square off in last debate before Manitoba election next week


But some voters are not exactly enamoured with the alternatives -- Tory Leader Brian Pallister or Liberal boss Rana Bokhari.

"I in no way want to see the NDP get another term ... I think they've done terrible things for this province," said Lindsey Anderson, a 33-year-old downtown Winnipeg resident who leans conservative. "But the Conservative party does not speak to me. Brian Pallister ... it's like 'what planet are you from?"'

Equally ambivalent is Jason Coward, who lives in south Winnipeg.

"I'm not seeing any new ideas. I'm not seeing a lot of innovation and ... there's not a lot of substance."

The race to Tuesday's vote has lacked inspiration, said Royce Koop, who teaches political science at the University of Manitoba.

"We have three leaders that aren't really inspiring enormous amounts of confidence, that aren't stars bringing enormous amounts of charisma to the race."

The NDP won 37 seats to 19 for the Tories and one for the Liberals in 2011. But for the first time since taking power in 1999, New Democrats have had to play defence.

Selinger, who barely survived a caucus coup last year, has made the majority of his campaign announcements in seats the NDP is trying to hold.

Pallister, backed by the strongest campaign machine since the Tories were last in power under Gary Filmon, has spent much of his time in NDP constituencies.

His personal popularity has lagged behind that of the party. The former MP has a few gaffes on his political resume, including once saying that Halloween is bad for the integrity of children. He also issued a Christmas greeting that included a reference to "infidel atheists." He was questioned during the campaign about the extensive time he has spent vacationing in Costa Rica.

The Liberals have a rookie leader in former lawyer Rana Bokhari. The party had several setbacks on the campaign trail, including having Elections Manitoba reject some candidates for improper paperwork.

Bokhari has also appeared to struggle at times to explain details of her platform. At one point she said she wanted to "get elected first" before working out details on a promise of full-day kindergarten.

Koop predicts that public anger against Selinger is likely to outweigh antipathy toward Pallister or Bokhari, which means Alberta's Rachel Notley will be the country's only NDP premier.

"I think the unpopularity of Mr. Selinger is much more important to understanding the outcome than Mr. Pallister's popularity."

http://www.ctvnews.ca/politics.....-1.2862628
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2016 7:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some of the key promises in the Manitoba election campaign for Tuesday's vote

Debate in 2016 Manitoba election
NDP Leader Greg Selinger, left to right, Liberal Leader Rana Bokhari, Green Party Leader James Beddome and Progressive Conservative Leader Brian Pallister take part in the provincial leaders' debate in Winnipeg on Tuesday, April 12, 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Trevor Hagan

The Canadian Press
Published Sunday, April 17, 2016 12:27PM EDT



WINNIPEG -- Voters head to the polls Tuesday in Manitoba. Here is a look at some of the promises the three main parties have made over the course of the campaign:

NDP
• Cut ambulance fees in half, create 1,000 new personal care home beds and expand hours and locations of QuickCare clinics to reduce pressure on emergency rooms.
• Spend more than $1 billion a year on infrastructure, replace red lights on perimeter highway around Winnipeg with overpasses and develop long-term plan to remove rail lines from Winnipeg.
• Replace student loans with grants, provide free tuition for students in child welfare up to age 25 and create 12,000 new child-care spaces.
• Continued deficits until at least 2021.




Progressive Conservatives
• Reduce provincial sales tax to seven per cent from eight per cent, raise income tax brackets with inflation, join the New West Partnership trade agreement with other western provinces.
• Spend at least $1 billion a year on infrastructure, increase tourism promotion and create special business plan for the north.
• Cut ambulance fees in half, set up a task force to find ways to cut health-care wait times and fast-track construction of 1,200 new personal care home beds.
• Increase operating funds for licensed family child-care spaces, make up to $20 million available for scholarships and bursaries with private sector, develop a program that focuses on literacy in elementary schools.
• Announce a target date for ending deficits once the party has updated budget figures.



Liberals
• A dedicated health unit to treat strokes, mental-health care covered under medicare and free ambulance rides for low-income seniors.
• Student loans converted to grants, full-day kindergarten.
• Private liquor stores would be allowed, property taxes on condominiums would be reduced and ride-hailing services such as Uber would be allowed.
• Municipalities would get one per cent of provincial sales tax for infrastructure and also a full sales tax rebate on goods they purchased.
• The province would move to proportional representation and 10 per cent of legislature seats would be set aside for indigenous people.
• Continued deficits until 2022.


http://www.ctvnews.ca/politics.....-1.2862680
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2016 7:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The election, as we predict it


Winnipeg Sun

First posted: Sunday, April 17, 2016 02:58 PM CDT | Updated: Sunday, April 17, 2016 04:36 PM CDT


It’s prediction time.

With voters heading to the polls Tuesday, here’s our best guesses — as well as those of a few of our friends — as to how things will shake out on election night:

Mark Hamm, Editor, Winnipeg Sun
•PC: 39
•NDP: 16
•Lib: 2

My take: Many Manitobans were hoping the Liberal brand would gain momentum here (a little boost from Trudeaumania 2.0), but the party withered when the heat was on and is destined to remain on the outside looking in. The majority of Manitobans have had their fill of the NDP’s tax and spend policies, but the party still has its core followers. At the end of election night, there’s no doubt there will be a new party in charge. The only remaining question is the size of their victory.

Kevin Engstrom, Deputy Editor, Winnipeg Sun
•PC: 41
•NDP: 15
•Lib: 1

My take: The NDP’s fearmongering and shameful smearing of Brian Pallister backfires, as it further confirms to voters just how rotten Selinger and company are willing to be to hang on to power. Expect the Tories to romp in rural Manitoba while scooping up Winnipeg’s suburbs. Don’t be surprised if Selinger has great difficulty even winning his seat in St. Boniface. Meanwhile, the lone Liberal win of the night goes to Cindy Lamoureux, Kevin’s daughter, in Burrows.

Tessa Vanderhart, Online Editor, Winnipeg Sun
•PC: 37
•NDP: 16
•Lib: 2
•Green: 1
•Independent: 1

My take: With an unprecedented (for Manitoba) amount of polling this election, we’ve been able to watch dramatic swings in support for all parties — from a Liberal surge to a potential Tory “super majority.” Online, people are engaged and angry but not vitriolic — making me wonder if this won’t be a breakthrough year for the Liberals (those who stayed above the fray, anyway) and Greens, with former NDP MLA Clarence Pettersen hanging on in Flin Flon. While my colleagues are predicting an NDP collapse, I can see plenty of scissor-averse voters hedging their bets with the devil they know.

Tom Brodbeck, Columnist, Winnipeg Sun
•PC: 46
•NDP: 9
•Lib: 2

My take: Manitobans will see a time-for-a-change dynamic like they’ve never seen before in provincial politics, and the Progressive Conservative Party will be the beneficiary of that change. Look for a stunning victory for the Tories Tuesday as the NDP and their hated leader Greg Selinger suffer their worst defeat in decades. The NDP will be virtually shutout outside of Winnipeg and will only hang on to their core seats inside the Perimeter. The Liberals will double their seats to two, with Jon Gerrard hanging on to his River Heights seat and grit candidate Cindy Lamoureux winning in Burrows.

Joyanne Pursaga, Political Reporter, Winnipeg Sun
•PC: 38
•NDP: 15
•Lib: 3
•Green: 1

My take: The NDP have been consistently down in the polls for years and have run out of time to rebound. Despite Liberal missteps in the campaign, the party managed to attract some quality candidates and stands a decent chance of gaining support from left-wing voters who want change but would never vote Conservative. Expect the Tories’ clean campaign and effective response to NDP attack ads to pay off, helping them steal seats in previously close races and maybe even some NDP strongholds.

Quito Maggi, President and CEO, Mainstreet Research
•PC: 44
•NDP: 12
•Lib: 1

My take: Brian Pallister and the Manitoba PCs have run a nearly flawless campaign and will surely win a majority government on Tuesday. The anti-incumbent sentiment drove votes to the Liberals, PCs and Greens throughout the pre-writ and early part of the election. As the Greens and Liberals struggled to field full slates of candidates, and Liberals faced controversies with candidates, we began seeing a majority of the NOT-NDP votes migrate to the PCs. As a result, we will see a large majority for the PCs. Expect some close races in Winnipeg where longtime NDP seats are at risk.

Royce Koop, Associate Professor of Political Studies, University of Manitoba
•PC: 41
•NDP: 15
•Lib: 1

My take: Manitoba’s electoral system is designed to produce majority governments. Brian Pallister’s lead is large enough that the system will guarantee him a big majority. In Winnipeg, both a likely Liberal collapse (which will prevent a split of the anti-PC vote) and Pallister’s late-in-the-campaign problems will allow the NDP to hold onto its core support ridings.

http://www.winnipegsun.com/201.....predict-it
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2016 7:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

12 candidates to watch on election night in Manitoba

NDP’s Wab Kinew, Liberals’ Peter Chura, PC’s Steven Fletcher among high-profile candidates

CBC News Posted: Apr 18, 2016 4:30 AM CT| Last Updated: Apr 18, 2016 4:30 AM CT



Aside from the party leaders – NDP Leader Greg Selinger, PC Leader Brian Pallister, Liberal Leader Rana Bokhari and Green Party Leader James Beddome – there are a number of candidates to keep an eye on as Manitobans head to the polls on April 19.


Here are CBC Manitoba's picks for candidates to watch on election night.


Wab Kinew – NDP – Fort Rouge


Wab Kinew – NDP – Fort Rouge
Wab Kinew – NDP – Fort Rouge

Wab Kinew is a former broadcaster, Canada Reads host, author, university administrator and rapper. He has had a rocky campaign during which he had to defend himself about his use of misogynistic and homophobic language in his rap lyrics as well as on his Twitter accounts. Kinew is running against Liberal Leader Rana Bokhari and PC spokesperson Audrey Gordon.


Kerri Irvin-Ross – NDP – Fort Richmond


Kerri Irvin-Ross – NDP – Fort Richmond
Kerri Irvin-Ross – NDP – Fort Richmond

Kerri Irvin-Ross has held the constituency for the last 13 years (as Fort Garry and later as Fort Richmond). She has held the difficult portfolio of minister of family services since 2013. A loss in Fort Richmond would be big for the NDP. Irvin-Ross is running against the PC's Sarah Guillemard, the Liberals Kyra Wilson and the Green Party's Cameron Proulx.


Sharon Blady – NDP – Kirkfield Park


Sharon Blady – NDP – Kirkfield Park
Sharon Blady – NDP – Kirkfield Park

Voters will be watching closely to see if Sharon Blady is re-elected in Kirkfield Park. In 2011 it was a tight race that Blady only won by 21 votes. She was expected to lose that election and was later appointed health minister, a high-profile portfolio. Blady is the spokesperson for the NDP and has been a strong campaigner, but Kirkfield Park is typically a Conservative-held constituency. The former leader of the PCs held the seat prior to Blady.

This time around, Blady is running against former city councillor Scott Fielding, who is running for the PCs. He won two terms as a city councillor, was a member of the former mayor's executive policy committee and was once the chair of the Winnipeg Police Board.

Also running in Kirkfield Park is Liberal Kelly Nord and the Green Party's Lisa Omand.


Nahanni Fontaine – NDP – St. Johns


Nahanni Fontaine – NDP – St. Johns
Nahanni Fontaine – NDP – St. Johns

Nahani Fontaine is a long-time advocate for an inquiry into murdered and missing indigenous women and girls.

She's filling big shoes for outgoing Gord Mackintosh, who has served for more than a decade as St. Johns' MLA. He has also had several high profile ministries, including family services and justice.

Fontaine, status Ojibway from Sagkeeng First Nation, is serving as the special adviser on aboriginal women's issues for Manitoba's Aboriginal Issues Committee of Cabinet.

If Fontaine were to lose, it would be a big miss for the NDP.


Peter Chura – Liberal – Seine River


Peter Chura – Liberal – Seine River
Peter Chura – Liberal – Seine River

Peter Chura was a TV anchor and producer at Global Winnipeg until a few months ago. Soon after, he announced he was running for the Liberals in Seine River, making him one of the more high-profile candidates the Liberals have. He has no other political experience and has run a low-profile campaign.


Jon Gerrard – Liberal – River Heights


Jon Gerrard – Liberal – River Heights
Jon Gerrard – Liberal – River Heights

Jon Gerrard is the only incumbent Liberal MLA and is the former leader of the Manitoba Liberals.

He has won the River Heights seat every election since 1999. He was previously an MP and is a physician and researcher.

He stepped down as leader of the Manitoba Liberal Party in 2013. Rana Bokhari is now Manitoba's Liberal leader.


Althea Guiboche – Liberal – Point Douglas


Althea Guiboche – Liberal – Point Douglas
Althea Guiboche – Liberal – Point Douglas

Althea Guiboche is an anti-poverty activist who is well-known in the community as "the Bannock Lady." Guiboche cooks up and serves large batches of bannock to the homeless and those in need in the North End of Winnipeg. Guiboche says she herself lived in poverty for long periods of time. She's running against incumbent NDP candidate Kevin Chief. Chief was a relatively high profile NDP MLA and was the minister of children and youth opportunities.


Cindy Lamoureux – Liberal – Burrows


Cindy Lamoureux – Liberal – Burrows
Cindy Lamoureux – Liberal – Burrows

Cindy Lamoureux is the daughter of long-time Liberal MLA and MP Kevin Lamoureux. Kevin was elected as an MLA in 1988 and as an MP in 2010. He is known for being tightly connected to his constituency and riding -- sitting at McDonald's every Saturday to meet people in his area.

Cindy, who is running for the first time, is a young community activist who has promised she will be as accessible as her dad. Cindy is going up against the NDP's incumbent Melanie Wight, who won the constituency in 2011.


Steven Fletcher – PC – Assiniboia


Steven Fletcher – PC – Assiniboia
Steven Fletcher – PC – Assiniboia

Steven Fletcher suffered a stunning loss to the Liberals in the last federal election. Fletcher was an MP from 2004 to 2015 for Charleswood-St. James- Assiniboia, and during that time, a cabinet minister. He was the first quadriplegic ever elected to Parliament. He is a vocal about assisted suicide, which was unpopular with former prime minister Stephen Harper. Fletcher is running in a constituency long held by the NDP.

Former cabinet minister Jim Rondeau held the seat from 1999 until now. He announced in 2015 he would not run in April's election. Fletcher is running against the Liberals' Ian McCausland, a well-known photographer, the NDP's Joe McKellep and the Green Party's Ileana Ohlsson.


Scott Fielding – PC – Kirkfield Park


Scott Fielding – PC – Kirkfield Park
Scott Fielding – PC – Kirkfield Park

Scott Fielding is a former city councillor in St. James who won two terms (in 2006 and 2010.) He was outspoken and quit embattled former mayor Sam Katz's executive policy committee. He was also former chair of the Winnipeg Police Board. He will try to win the seat from NDP incumbent Sharon Blady, who had become a high-profile member of the party. She has been the province's minister of health since 2014.


Audrey Gordon – PC – Fort Rouge


Audrey Gordon – PC – Fort Rouge
Audrey Gordon – PC – Fort Rouge

Audrey Gordon will take on two juggernauts on April 19. She's running against Liberal Leader Rana Bokhari and the NDP's high profile candidate Wab Kinew, who is a former broadcaster and rapper. Gordon hasn't received as much negative media attention as Kinew and Bokhari, and has acted as the spokesperson for the PC's campaign. Gordon was once aligned with the NDP and has also been a civil servant for 30 years in the area of health care.


Jeannette Montufar – PC – Fort Garry/Riverview


Jeannette Montufar – PC – Fort Garry/Riverview
Jeannette Montufar – PC – Fort Garry/Riverview

Jeannette Montufar is taking on NDP candidate James Allum, and a loss for the NDP in this riding would be a big defeat. Allum was first elected in 2011 and was appointed minister of education two years later. Montufar is a high-profile candidate and professor of civil engineering at the University of Manitoba. She's done extensive work on pedestrian safety and is a small business owner.


http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/.....-1.3534714
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2016 11:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:
The election, as we predict it


Winnipeg Sun

First posted: Sunday, April 17, 2016 02:58 PM CDT | Updated: Sunday, April 17, 2016 04:36 PM CDT


It’s prediction time.

With voters heading to the polls Tuesday, here’s our best guesses — as well as those of a few of our friends — as to how things will shake out on election night:

Mark Hamm, Editor, Winnipeg Sun
•PC: 39
•NDP: 16
•Lib: 2

My take: Many Manitobans were hoping the Liberal brand would gain momentum here (a little boost from Trudeaumania 2.0), but the party withered when the heat was on and is destined to remain on the outside looking in. The majority of Manitobans have had their fill of the NDP’s tax and spend policies, but the party still has its core followers. At the end of election night, there’s no doubt there will be a new party in charge. The only remaining question is the size of their victory.

Kevin Engstrom, Deputy Editor, Winnipeg Sun
•PC: 41
•NDP: 15
•Lib: 1

My take: The NDP’s fearmongering and shameful smearing of Brian Pallister backfires, as it further confirms to voters just how rotten Selinger and company are willing to be to hang on to power. Expect the Tories to romp in rural Manitoba while scooping up Winnipeg’s suburbs. Don’t be surprised if Selinger has great difficulty even winning his seat in St. Boniface. Meanwhile, the lone Liberal win of the night goes to Cindy Lamoureux, Kevin’s daughter, in Burrows.

Tessa Vanderhart, Online Editor, Winnipeg Sun
•PC: 37
•NDP: 16
•Lib: 2
•Green: 1
•Independent: 1

My take: With an unprecedented (for Manitoba) amount of polling this election, we’ve been able to watch dramatic swings in support for all parties — from a Liberal surge to a potential Tory “super majority.” Online, people are engaged and angry but not vitriolic — making me wonder if this won’t be a breakthrough year for the Liberals (those who stayed above the fray, anyway) and Greens, with former NDP MLA Clarence Pettersen hanging on in Flin Flon. While my colleagues are predicting an NDP collapse, I can see plenty of scissor-averse voters hedging their bets with the devil they know.

Tom Brodbeck, Columnist, Winnipeg Sun
•PC: 46
•NDP: 9
•Lib: 2

My take: Manitobans will see a time-for-a-change dynamic like they’ve never seen before in provincial politics, and the Progressive Conservative Party will be the beneficiary of that change. Look for a stunning victory for the Tories Tuesday as the NDP and their hated leader Greg Selinger suffer their worst defeat in decades. The NDP will be virtually shutout outside of Winnipeg and will only hang on to their core seats inside the Perimeter. The Liberals will double their seats to two, with Jon Gerrard hanging on to his River Heights seat and grit candidate Cindy Lamoureux winning in Burrows.

Joyanne Pursaga, Political Reporter, Winnipeg Sun
•PC: 38
•NDP: 15
•Lib: 3
•Green: 1

My take: The NDP have been consistently down in the polls for years and have run out of time to rebound. Despite Liberal missteps in the campaign, the party managed to attract some quality candidates and stands a decent chance of gaining support from left-wing voters who want change but would never vote Conservative. Expect the Tories’ clean campaign and effective response to NDP attack ads to pay off, helping them steal seats in previously close races and maybe even some NDP strongholds.

Quito Maggi, President and CEO, Mainstreet Research
•PC: 44
•NDP: 12
•Lib: 1

My take: Brian Pallister and the Manitoba PCs have run a nearly flawless campaign and will surely win a majority government on Tuesday. The anti-incumbent sentiment drove votes to the Liberals, PCs and Greens throughout the pre-writ and early part of the election. As the Greens and Liberals struggled to field full slates of candidates, and Liberals faced controversies with candidates, we began seeing a majority of the NOT-NDP votes migrate to the PCs. As a result, we will see a large majority for the PCs. Expect some close races in Winnipeg where longtime NDP seats are at risk.

Royce Koop, Associate Professor of Political Studies, University of Manitoba
•PC: 41
•NDP: 15
•Lib: 1

My take: Manitoba’s electoral system is designed to produce majority governments. Brian Pallister’s lead is large enough that the system will guarantee him a big majority. In Winnipeg, both a likely Liberal collapse (which will prevent a split of the anti-PC vote) and Pallister’s late-in-the-campaign problems will allow the NDP to hold onto its core support ridings.

http://www.winnipegsun.com/201.....predict-it


I think the Tories over 40 seats and the NDP under 14 is a little optimistic for the Tories.
Would be impressive for the Tories to flip 20+ NDP seats but it seems a little too good to be true.

If the Tories walk out with 35 seats (exactly what the NDP has now) that would be quite the coup in itself.
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2016 1:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Manitoba election: Advance voter turnout 38% higher than in 2011

About 109,000 voters cast ballots from April 9 until Saturday

CBC News Posted: Apr 18, 2016 9:01 AM CT| Last Updated: Apr 18, 2016 11:29 AM CT

A voter exits a polling station in the 2011 provincial election in Manitoba. More than 78,000 people voted in advance polls in that election.



External Links

■Elections Manitoba: Advance voting

(Note: CBC does not endorse and is not responsible for the content of external links.)



Election day in Manitoba is Tuesday, but more than 109,000 people have already cast ballots in advance polls — an increase of 38 per cent from the last provincial election.

Approximately 109,078 eligible voters took advantage of the advance voting period, which ran from April 9 until Saturday, according to Elections Manitoba.

That number is an increase of about 38 per cent from 78,786 people who cast ballots in the eight-day advance voting period leading up to the 2011 election, a spokesperson told CBC News.

It's the highest advance participation rate in a provincial election to date, the spokesperson added.

Elections Manitoba attributed the higher turnout to greater public awareness of how people can vote in advance and the fact they can vote at any advance voting location. As well, the agency cited its website and mobile app, which have information on where to find advance voting locations.

Manitobans who have not voted yet can do so on Tuesday, which is election day. Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Coverage of the results will begin at 8 p.m. CT (9 p.m. ET) Tuesday on CBC Radio One 89.3 FM and CBC Television.

You can personalize your election night experience with our results dashboard, where you can watch our interactive map change as the results come in, set "favourites" with constituencies you want to follow, watch and listen to our television and radio specials, view Twitter updates from our reporters in the field and join a live discussion.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/.....-1.3540723
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Manitoba Provincial election to be held April 19

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