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RCO





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PostPosted: Sun Mar 27, 2016 9:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Leaders 'fired up' as Saskatchewan election enters home stretch

Brad Wall
Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall speaks with reporters following a leaders' debate with NDP leader Cam Broten at the CBC Saskatchewan building in Regina Wednesday, March 23, 2016. (Mark Taylor / THE CANADIAN PRESS)


The Canadian Press
Published Sunday, March 27, 2016 10:05AM EDT



REGINA -- Campaign promises have been made, political leaders have faced off in a debate and now the Saskatchewan election is in the home stretch.

The final week of the 27-day campaign is starting. Advance voting takes place from March 29 to April 2 and election day is April 4.

Saskatchewan Party Leader and Premier Brad Wall says his party will focus on making sure its supporters head to the polls.




Related Stories

Wall says he'll rebuild Saskatchewan's rainy day fund if re-elected


Sask. premier wants $570M from Ottawa in federal budget


"I think the most important thing in a campaign, arguably even more important than platforms, is getting on doorsteps and talking to people, hearing from them directly and respectfully asking for their vote," said Wall.

"That's actually the momentum in the last days of the campaign. We're going to have a massive get-out-the-vote campaign, as we did in the last election."

Wall says he's also going to keep talking about the Saskatchewan Party's record.

"It's a good record, it's not perfect -- we never claimed that -- but present it as a good and positive record for the province."

The Saskatchewan Party has released a platform that is largely a recap of its record in office since 2007. There are just six new spending promises totalling $105.4 million.

Wall has said the platform is based on a goal of returning the province to balanced budgets by 2017-18. Saskatchewan is running a $427-million deficit this fiscal year and is forecasting a deficit next year too.

Meanwhile, Wall says the NDP has "a long list of angry complaints" and claims their platform promises don't add up financially.

The NDP has argued the Saskatchewan Party inherited nearly $2 billion in the province's rainy day savings account, but drained it dry.

The New Democrats are also running a scaled down platform, which includes a small tax cut for middle-class families that would save nearly 70 per cent of people about $90 a year. The tax cut would be largely offset by increasing taxes one per cent for people who make more than $175,000.

NDP Leader Cam Broten says he believes people are getting more engaged as the campaign enters the final week.

"I think for a lot of people when you have the debate, that's one of the first times that they sort of tune in and start paying attention in a bigger way," said Broten.

Broten, who is heading into his first campaign since becoming NDP leader in March 2013, says the plan is to keep campaigning hard.

"We're fired up. Everyone in this room...is ready to go hit the doorsteps right away," said Broten.

"I'm very pleased with how the debate went. I'm pleased with the policy announcements and the campaign that we've been rolling out and I'm excited. And I know I'm just going to keep going full out between now and 'E' day."

Saskatchewan voters last went to the polls in November 2011, when Wall and his Saskatchewan Party won a second term in office.

The NDP is looking to rebuild after being left with just nine of the 58 seats in the legislature. This time around there are 61 constituencies.

http://www.ctvnews.ca/politics.....-1.2833778
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Mar 28, 2016 8:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Carbon pricing should be an issue in the Saskatchewan provincial election




Garrett Richards
More from Garrett Richards

Published on: March 28, 2016 | Last Updated: March 28, 2016 6:00 AM CST


Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall is concerned about the economic impact of a national carbon tax.

Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall is concerned about the economic impact of a national carbon tax. Gord Waldner / Saskatoon StarPhoenix


Carbon pricing refers to any method of charging those who emit carbon dioxide, the main greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change. Typically, this means either a straightforward carbon tax (e.g. $15 per tonne of emissions) or a more complex cap-and-trade system whereby companies are allocated emission permits and may buy and sell them among each other.

A recent poll showed that 46 per cent of Saskatchewan voters oppose carbon pricing, while 36 per cent favour it. Even so, we haven’t seen much debate on the issue in the election campaign so far. Part of the problem is that there is no particularly vocal proponent of carbon pricing. While the Saskatchewan Party has made its opposition clear, the New Democratic Party’s position has been vague and its platform is silent on the issue.

Without a vocal proponent, critical claims will go largely unchallenged. Saskatchewan Party leader Brad Wall, for instance, has asserted that carbon pricing will “kneecap” the already struggling oil industry and kill jobs. It is important to consider the opposing perspective.

Recent studies by Sustainable Prosperity (at the University of Ottawa) and the Nicholas Institute (at Duke University) suggest that British Columbia’s carbon tax did not harm the economy. Actually, it has more industry and public support now than it did before it was implemented and is associated with a substantial reduction in emissions.





Carbon pricing is almost universally supported by economists, since it is far more effective than standard regulation. It’s easier to get right and provides an incentive for low-carbon technologies and practices. As well, there are many ways to use any resulting revenue, such as investing in renewables or providing tax reductions elsewhere. The newly formed Smart Prosperity coalition, which includes representation from oil companies and banks, also is in favour.

Given these true characteristics of carbon pricing, the fact that it finds support among even high-profile conservatives is not surprising. Both Preston Manning and Michael Chong have supported carbon pricing. They know that full-cost accounting makes financial sense. People and companies shouldn’t be allowed to pollute without paying for the costs.

There’s also an underlying interest in the low-carbon economy that it would help facilitate. For example, Iron and Earth is made up of some Alberta oilsands workers who are interested in adapting their skills to work with renewable energy, acknowledging that the oil sector is unpredictable and may not recover. As well, the Canadian Labour Congress recently proposed a plan to create one million “climate jobs” nationally.

Given the extensive support for carbon pricing and a low-carbon economy among many experts, politicians, companies and workers, it is surprising that it does not already have a vocal proponent in Saskatchewan. A broad effect of this conspicuous absence is that defenders of the fossil fuel economy are not strongly challenged, which can lead to careless policies.

For example, a 2010 report by the International Institute for Sustainable Development observed that Saskatchewan pays $300 million in subsidies to oil companies annually. These subsidies allegedly increase economic growth, but they do not return the government’s investment and do not create jobs — the two things we actually want from growth.

As well, the provincial government’s defence of fossil fuels led it to facilitate “critical thinking” presentations at universities and high schools by a well-known climate skeptic in October. It also overpaid for its “clean coal” project at Boundary Dam and, due to delays, is paying penalties to the company that is supposed to buy the sequestered carbon.

Most problematically, Wall took a strong position against carbon pricing at the recent first ministers’ meeting on climate change, leading to a very weak national agreement. When we also consider that Saskatchewan’s per-person emissions are higher than any other province, and higher than in any other country, it is clear that what we do here could have national and international consequences.

Carbon pricing may not win over the majority of Saskatchewan voters anytime soon, but it merits a vocal proponent and genuine consideration. It would be irresponsible of us not to make it an election issue.

Garrett Richards is a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Saskatchewan.

http://leaderpost.com/opinion/.....l-election
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Mar 28, 2016 8:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Saskatchewan election into the home stretch


Regina, SK, Canada / 620 CKRM

Christina Cherneskey

March 27, 2016 08:02 am


WALL_BROTEN_WEEK_2_COVER



NDP Leader Cam Broten will be taking part in a Facebook town hall meeting in Regina Monday as the provincial election campaign enters its final week.

Broten promised over the weekend to establish a Ministry of Northern Saskatchewan, as well as hire more mental health workers for the region and establish an air ambulance base there.

He also pledged to reduce electricity rates for northern residents and businesses and improve cell coverage and broadband Internet.

Saskatchewan Party Leader Brad Wall continues to reiterate his party’s campaign theme they are the ones who will keep the province’s economy strong.

Wall says Saskatchewan had the worst job creation record in Canada under the former NDP government.

He also says the Saskatchewan Party is building new hospitals, new schools and new long-term care facilities.

Voter go to the polls April 4.


Advance polls open Tuesday, March 29.


Anyone with questions on voting in this election should contact Elections Saskatchewan.

http://www.620ckrm.com/2016/03.....gn-begins/
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 29, 2016 8:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( a sign the sask election is almost over advance polls begin today and go till april 2 , seems like one of the shortest provincial elections I can recall )

Saskatchewan Election 2016: Advance polls open Tuesday

Advanced polling begins March 29 and runs to April 2, election takes place April 4

CBC News Posted: Mar 28, 2016 5:43 PM CT| Last Updated: Mar 28, 2016 7:47 PM CT

Saskatchewan voters head to the polls on April 4.


External Links

■Elections Saskatchewan

(Note: CBC does not endorse and is not responsible for the content of external links.)



People across Saskatchewan are heading to the polls April 4 to vote in the provincial election, but for those who can't make it to the polls on election day — advanced polling begins Tuesday, March 29 and runs until April 2.

When you go to your local polling station, you need to know when and where to show up, but you might also need to know what ID to bring.

Use Vote Compass to compare the party platforms ahead of Saskatchewan's election


Here's a voting guide.

When will the vote happen?

The provincial election is taking place on April 4, but there is also advance polling from March 29 to April 2.

Who can vote?

To vote you must:
■Be a Canadian citizen. Permanent residents, immigrants and refugees cannot vote.
■Be at least 18 years old as of April 4.
■Have lived in Saskatchewan for at least six months before the election is called.

Are there any special rules around voters?

There are special rules for students, Canadian military personnel, candidates, and British Subjects who have lived in the province a specific time period. Read about them here.

Inmates in a provincial correctional centre may be eligible to vote as an absentee voter by mail.

How do I register to vote?

If you're a registered voter your voter information card should've arrived by mail. It tells you where and when to vote and what ID to bring. If you aren't on the list, you can still vote by registering in person when you go vote, either at an advance poll or on election day.

Anyone who registers at the time of voting must provide identification documents and complete a form in the presence of election officers

However, if you're not on the voting list or are unsure of your status, you can take care of that by visiting Election Saskatchewan's voter registration page or by calling 1-877-958-8683. You can check if you are registered to vote online or by calling 1-877-958-8683.

Voter information is stored with Saskatchewan Elections and used in future provincial elections. Voter lists are also shared with political parties and election candidates, but the information can only be used for election purposes.

What ID do I need to vote?

You need ID to prove your identity and address in order to vote. There are three options:
■You can use a driver's licence or other government-issued ID that has your name, photo and address.
■You can show two pieces of ID. Both must have your name and one must have your address. There are more than 50 acceptable documents you can find here. You can use an electronic copy of documents such as a utility bill if you receive them online.
■At the voting stations, you can sign a declaration, and a registered voter from your constituency, such as a neighbour or roommate, may vouch for you. Each person can only vouch once.

What is a Voter Information Card?

The cards are mailed to every registered voter. They tell the voter where and when to vote and it is an acceptable form of ID, but it must be used with another document.

If you received your card but the information isn't correct, go to the Voter Registration page for Elections Saskatchewan or call 1-877-958-8683 to update your information.

Where do I vote?

Again, the Elections Saskatchewan website shows you where you vote. You can also call them at 1-877-958-8683.

You can also look up your constituency here.

How can I vote?

There are six ways to vote in the provincial election:
■You can vote in advance from March 29 to April 2 at specific locations in your constituency. You will still need the same ID. Advance voting hours are March 29 to April 1 from 3 p.m. to 10 p.m. CST, and April 2 from 12 p.m. to 7 p.m.
■You can vote on election day. All voting places across the province are open from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.
■You can vote in a personal care home. A full list of voting places in select personal care homes and seniors' homes around the province will be available on the Elections Saskatchewan website closer to election day.
■You can vote in a hospital if you are a patient on April 4, even if it's not in your constituency.
■You can vote in your home if you have a disability. You can make arrangements to have an election worker come over so you and your caregiver can cast a ballot. Once the election is called you can download an application from the Elections Saskatchewan website or call your local returning officer.
■You can vote by mail. This is a good option for out-of-province students and snowbirds. You must apply for an absentee ballot (in French) and mail or email it to Elections Saskatchewan. You will get a voting kit in the mail and the ballot must be marked and mailed back, postmarked by 8 p.m. on April 4.

How do you vote if you are homeless?

If required, people with no fixed address can get a Letter of Stay from a shelter such as the YMCA or Salvation Army to use as ID when voting.

Do I have to return to my First Nation if I live off reserve to vote?

No. You vote in the constituency in which you ordinarily live.

Do I get time off of work to vote?

Every person is entitled to three hours to vote.

What happens at the polls on Election Day?

If you are already registered on election day you will show ID and an election worker will cross your name off of their list. If you are not registered, you will have to register and an election official will take your information and add you to the voter list.

You then get a ballot and will go behind a voting screen where you will mark the candidate of your choice with an X (check marks and other marks are also accepted) and fold your ballot. The election worker will show you what ballot box to put it in.

You have voted.

What happens after polls close?

After the polls close, election officials open the ballot boxes and count each ballot.

Candidates are allowed to have a representative there to watch the count.

The results are passed on to the constituency returning officer and the ballots are resealed in the ballot boxes to await the final count, which actually happens 12 days after the election. The final count happens later because some absentee ballots — including mailed-in, hospital, and remand centre ballots — won't arrive until later.

What if there is a tie?

If there is a tie or a very close election, any candidate can ask for a recount. In some cases recounts are mandatory.

How many political parties are there?

There are six parties registered in Saskatchewan:
■Green Party of Saskatchewan
■New Democratic Party
■Saskatchewan Section Progressive Conservative Party of Saskatchewan
■Saskatchewan Liberal Association
■Saskatchewan Party
■Western Independence Party of Saskatchewan.

Use CBC's Vote Compass to compare the party positions with your own.

Vote Compass Saskatchewan 1
(CBC)

How many constituencies are in the province?

There are 61 constituencies for the 2016 election. Find which one you live in here.

How does the voting system work?

In Saskatchewan, the first past the post system is used. That means each voter is allowed to cast one vote for one of the candidates in their constituency. The candidate with the most votes wins. The political party with the most candidates elected throughout the province becomes the government. The leader of that party becomes the Premier.


http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/.....-1.3509986
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Mar 30, 2016 9:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Saskatchewan election lacks defining issue: analyst


By CKOM News // March 29, 2016 - 10:48am


Feature Focus

Sask. Votes 2016 View Series
.

File photo of Sask. Party campaign office in Saskatoon in 2011.


Bre McAdam/CKOM News
File photo of Sask. Party campaign office in Saskatoon in 2011.



If you’re unsure about the big issues this election, you’re not alone.

Political expert Joseph Garcea said this year’s campaign hasn’t had a clear issue, and short term promises have replaced deep discussions about the role of government.

This in turn, has offered voters little to define major differences between provincial parties.

“That’s really been at the heart of this. It’s really been how well have things been managed? How poorly have things been managed?” said Garcea.

The University of Saskatchewan professor said he’s heard people lament the fact this election has focused more on marginal adjustments than on fundamental issues.

He said deeper discussions could have taken place on community development in northern Saskatchewan, along with indigenous issues. Instead, Garcea believes parties have touched on these topics in a limited way.

Not surprising, he said, during election time.

“There’s a fine line between reassuring people that there’s stability, and thinking about radical alternatives for the future. People sometimes get uneasy about that and parties are reluctant to engage in those kinds of conversations in public in case it backfires on them.”

As for how effectively parties have communicated this election, Garcea said the trend toward increased television and radio advertising has served to engage more people in the race.

“Lawn signs and billboards are still quite important, but their importance is diminished in light of social media and television ads that can be focused at critical times,” said Garcia.

As for the days ahead, the political expert kept his advice simple: mobilize voters. Garcea said this is most crucial for the NDP as they try to gain seats.

http://ckom.com/article/680806.....ue-analyst
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Mar 30, 2016 9:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Saskatchewan Party Leader Brad Wall campaigns in province's north

Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall
Saskatchewan Party Leader Brad Wall poses for photos before a debate in Regina Wednesday, March 23, 2016. (Mark Taylor/THE CANADIAN PRESS)



The Canadian Press
Published Monday, March 28, 2016 9:30AM EDT
Last Updated Monday, March 28, 2016 1:19PM EDT


LA RONGE, Sask. -- Saskatchewan Party Leader Brad Wall is boasting about his government's record in the province's north, while criticizing the NDP's election promises.

Wall is on the campaign trail in La Ronge, where he's thanking people for their efforts during last summer's forest fires and evacuation.

The Saskatchewan Party says if it's re-elected next Monday, it will expand a robotics telemedicine pilot program that lets doctors connect with a patient remotely.

NDP Leader Cam Broten said on the weekend that he would establish a Ministry of Northern Saskatchewan, hire more mental-health workers for the region and establish an air ambulance base.

He also pledged to reduce electricity rates for northern residents and businesses and to improve cell coverage and broadband Internet.

The northern constituency of Cumberland could be hotly contested as La Ronge Mayor Thomas Sierzycki, who is running for the Saskatchewan Party, faces NDP incumbent Doyle Vermette.

The Saskatchewan Party also put out a news release Monday that said there's no cost attached to 18 promises in the NDP's election platform.

The Sask. Party calls the plan reckless and says it would lead to ballooning deficits; however, the NDP has repeatedly said the platform is fully costed.


http://www.ctvnews.ca/politics.....-1.2834643
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Mar 30, 2016 9:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

March 30, 2016 9:15 am

Leaders bypass rural Saskatchewan to focus on urban battleground


By Jennifer Graham The Canadian Press


Political leaders have been bypassing rural Saskatchewan to focus on the urban battleground for votes in the provincial election.


REGINA – Brad Wall says his Saskatchewan Party will “never, ever” take rural Saskatchewan for granted, even if all the election promises are being made in the cities.

“We’re going to work very hard to try to earn the chance to serve again in rural Saskatchewan and we’re grateful for the support in the past, but we assume nothing about future support, Wall said Tuesday in Regina.

The campaign officially kicked off March 8.




Global News

Since then, Wall and NDP Leader Cam Broten have largely bounced between Regina, Moose Jaw, Saskatoon, and Prince Albert. They’ve each made a trip to La Ronge to try to woo northern voters.

Both the Saskatchewan Party and the NDP released their election platforms in Saskatoon.

FULL COVERAGE: Decision Saskatchewan 2016

Agriculture didn’t even come up in the leaders’ debate March 23.

The only major announcement made outside a city was when Wall ventured about half an hour from Regina to say that the Saskatchewan Party will spend $70 million over three years to repair more highways if it wins the April 4 provincial election.

Wall says that’s because Regina and Saskatoon are the major media centres.

“We’re certainly trying to get everywhere, but we do begin the days where there are media centres in the province to try to get our message out,” said Wall.

The premier says he believes it’s an approach that many campaigns have taken in recent elections, including the Saskatchewan NDP.

The NDP say it also is not taking the rural vote for granted.

“We’ve got incredibly strong candidates all over the province and, while we often start the day in a city, Cam Broten has also visited many rural communities,” campaign spokesman George Soule said in an email. “For example, he enjoyed bannock burgers in La Ronge and took in some curling in Shell Lake.

“Brad Wall showed that he is taking rural Saskatchewan for granted when he refused to attend a rural health care town hall in Craik. During the forum, Cam Broten reannounced his commitment to fix rural access to health care and ambulance services.”

But Tom McIntosh, head of the Department of Politics at the University of Regina, doesn’t buy Wall’s explanation about the cities being where the reporters are.

“I think that’s a little disingenuous,” McIntosh said in an interview with The Canadian Press.

“Sorry, but if he wanted to travel to a small town and make an announcement, (reporters) would follow him because you want the coverage of him making the announcement and if you have to drive to wherever to do it, you guys will.”

McIntosh says he thinks the real reason is that rural Saskatchewan has become a stronghold for the Saskatchewan Party.

Wall and his party won 49 of the 58 seats in the Saskatchewan legislature in the 2011 election. The NDP was left with just nine seats. Those were in Regina, Saskatoon and the far north.

This time around, Saskatchewan residents will vote in 61 ridings; three were added after the electoral map was redrawn. Two of the new seats are in Saskatoon and one is in Regina.

“The battleground in this election is in urban Saskatchewan. Rural Saskatchewan is, I think, as I said, it’s a lock,” said McIntosh.


http://globalnews.ca/news/2607.....tleground/
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 31, 2016 8:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ten election races to watch outside Saskatchewan's major centres




Will Chabun
More from Will Chabun

Published on: March 30, 2016 | Last Updated: March 30, 2016 9:50 AM CST


Here are ten ridings outside Regina and Saskatoon to watch as the provincial election campaign unfolds.

Here are ten ridings outside Regina and Saskatoon to watch as the provincial election campaign unfolds. Provided



Here are ten ridings outside Regina and Saskatoon to watch as the provincial election campaign unfolds:

Kindersley, which suddenly has become one of the most interesting races in the province. The Sask. party’s Bill Boyd has held this seat, with one break, since 1991, winning it in 2011 with 79.7 per cent of the vote. But the high-profile cabinet minister has been the subject of considerable controversy, ranging from smart meters to a land sale at Regina’s Global Transportation Hub to use of government aircraft. Jason Dearborn, who held the seat for the Sask. Party from 2002-2007, is running as an independent. Also in the race are Charles Jedlicka (NDP), Darren Donald (Liberal) and Terry Smith (Progressive Conservative).

Meadow Lake, which was one of the last NDP rural strongholds. NDPer Maynard Sonntag held it for four terms before losing in 2007 to Jeremy Harrison — by only 36 votes. In 2011, Harrison grew his margin, getting 62 per cent of all votes, vs. 36.7 per cent for the NDP. This time, Harrison is being challenged by the NDP’s Dwayne Lasas, who has served two terms as vice-chief of the Meadow Lake Tribal Council. Also in the race are Eric Schalm (Green Party) and Eric McCrimmon (Liberal).

Moose Jaw Wakamow. Not so long ago, Moose Jaw regularly sent two NDP MLAs to the legislature. In this riding, which covers the city’s working and middle class south hill, 2011 saw the Sask. Party’s Greg Lawrence defeat New Democrat Deb Higgins (now the mayor of Moose Jaw) by only 201 votes, with 345 votes divided among other candidates. This time, he’s facing the NDP’s Karen Purdy, the Greens’ Shaun Drake and Liberal Terry Gabel. Will the Greens and Liberals keep their support this time around? Or will those votes shift to the NDP?





Moose Jaw North has been another close-fought riding in the recent past, often held by the NDP. But in 2007, the Sask. Party’s Warren Michelson defeated veteran New Democrat MLA and cabinet minister Glenn Hagel by only 33 votes. Michelson widened his margin over the NDP to 1,797 votes in the 2011 election, with only 399 votes going to other parties. This time, Michelson faces New Democrat Corey Atkinson, Liberal Brenda Colenutt and Green Caleb Maclowich.

The Battlefords, which is little changed from the seat of the same name won by Herb Cox of the Sask. Party in 2011 with 51.06 per cent of the vote. In the same campaign, the NDP got 35.83 per cent and the then-leader of the Liberals, Ryan Bater a hefty 11.76 per cent. Can this election’s Liberal candidate, Dexter Gopher, get as many votes? If not, where will they go? Also in the race are Josh Hunt (Green Party) and New Democrat Rob Feist.

Prince Albert Carlton, where the Sask. Party’s Darryl Hickie took the riding in 2011 with 60 per cent of the vote. It’s hard to say what will happen this time around: back in 2007, there were only 61 votes between Hickie and the NDP candidate. Also, Hickie isn’t running this year. Instead, the Sask. Party candidate is Joe Hargrave, who’s running against the NDP’s Shayne Lazarowich, Liberal Winston McKay and Asia Yellowtail of the Green Party.

Prince Albert Northcote, where the Sask. Party’s Victoria Jurgens beat NDP incumbent Darcy Furber by less than 200 votes in 2011. Local issues have included the long-running clamour for a second bridge across the North Saskatchewan River near the city. NDP Leader Cam Broten recently visited the city to flag what he sees as Sask. Party vulnerability on this issue, plus health care and government job cuts. Can this be exploited by Nicole Rancourt (NDP), Liberal Jonathan Fraser or Tracey Yellowtail (Green Party)?

Cumberland, a sprawling northern seat where the Sask. Party’s Thomas Sierzycki faces off against the NDP’s Doyle Vermette. Vermette is a veteran MLA who got 63.2 per cent of the vote in the 2011 election; Sierzycki has the profile that comes with being the mayor of La Ronge and got his nomination almost two years ago. Also contesting this seat are Mick Taylor-Lessard (Green Party) and George Morin (Liberal).

Rosthern-Shellbrook, where the NDP’s Rose Freeman faces off against incumbent Scott Moe of the Sask. Party — plus Orrin Murray Greyeyes (Liberals) and Jade Duckett (Greens). Historical twist: the Sask. Party’s Dennis Allchurch held this riding from 1999-2011, when he lost a nomination meeting to Moe, who went on to get 65 per cent of the votes vs. vs. 31.8 for the NDP. Freeman is the president of the Shellbrook Chamber of Commerce.

Saskatchewan Rivers, which covers the area to the north and east of Prince Albert. In it, Saskatchewan Party incumbent Nadine Wilson faces the NDP’s Lyle Whitefish. Though the NDP has held this seat in the recent past, in 2011 Wilson notched 66 per cent of the vote vs. the NDP’s 31.2 per cent. Brenda McKnight (Liberal) rounds out the field.

Finally, watch any rural seat where a long-sitting MLA has retired. By coincidence, all were previously in the Sask. Party category: Wood River (D.F. “Yogi” Huyghebaert), Melville-Saltcoats (Bob Bjornerud), Estevan (Doreen Eagles), Cypress Hills (Wayne Elhard), Kelvington-Wadena (June Draude), Canora-Pelly (Ken Krawetz) and Moosomin (Don Toth).

http://thestarphoenix.com/news.....skatchewan
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 31, 2016 8:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ten election races to watch outside Saskatchewan's major centres




Will Chabun
More from Will Chabun

Published on: March 30, 2016 | Last Updated: March 30, 2016 9:50 AM CST


Here are ten ridings outside Regina and Saskatoon to watch as the provincial election campaign unfolds.

Here are ten ridings outside Regina and Saskatoon to watch as the provincial election campaign unfolds. Provided



Here are ten ridings outside Regina and Saskatoon to watch as the provincial election campaign unfolds:

Kindersley, which suddenly has become one of the most interesting races in the province. The Sask. party’s Bill Boyd has held this seat, with one break, since 1991, winning it in 2011 with 79.7 per cent of the vote. But the high-profile cabinet minister has been the subject of considerable controversy, ranging from smart meters to a land sale at Regina’s Global Transportation Hub to use of government aircraft. Jason Dearborn, who held the seat for the Sask. Party from 2002-2007, is running as an independent. Also in the race are Charles Jedlicka (NDP), Darren Donald (Liberal) and Terry Smith (Progressive Conservative).

Meadow Lake, which was one of the last NDP rural strongholds. NDPer Maynard Sonntag held it for four terms before losing in 2007 to Jeremy Harrison — by only 36 votes. In 2011, Harrison grew his margin, getting 62 per cent of all votes, vs. 36.7 per cent for the NDP. This time, Harrison is being challenged by the NDP’s Dwayne Lasas, who has served two terms as vice-chief of the Meadow Lake Tribal Council. Also in the race are Eric Schalm (Green Party) and Eric McCrimmon (Liberal).

Moose Jaw Wakamow. Not so long ago, Moose Jaw regularly sent two NDP MLAs to the legislature. In this riding, which covers the city’s working and middle class south hill, 2011 saw the Sask. Party’s Greg Lawrence defeat New Democrat Deb Higgins (now the mayor of Moose Jaw) by only 201 votes, with 345 votes divided among other candidates. This time, he’s facing the NDP’s Karen Purdy, the Greens’ Shaun Drake and Liberal Terry Gabel. Will the Greens and Liberals keep their support this time around? Or will those votes shift to the NDP?





Moose Jaw North has been another close-fought riding in the recent past, often held by the NDP. But in 2007, the Sask. Party’s Warren Michelson defeated veteran New Democrat MLA and cabinet minister Glenn Hagel by only 33 votes. Michelson widened his margin over the NDP to 1,797 votes in the 2011 election, with only 399 votes going to other parties. This time, Michelson faces New Democrat Corey Atkinson, Liberal Brenda Colenutt and Green Caleb Maclowich.

The Battlefords, which is little changed from the seat of the same name won by Herb Cox of the Sask. Party in 2011 with 51.06 per cent of the vote. In the same campaign, the NDP got 35.83 per cent and the then-leader of the Liberals, Ryan Bater a hefty 11.76 per cent. Can this election’s Liberal candidate, Dexter Gopher, get as many votes? If not, where will they go? Also in the race are Josh Hunt (Green Party) and New Democrat Rob Feist.

Prince Albert Carlton, where the Sask. Party’s Darryl Hickie took the riding in 2011 with 60 per cent of the vote. It’s hard to say what will happen this time around: back in 2007, there were only 61 votes between Hickie and the NDP candidate. Also, Hickie isn’t running this year. Instead, the Sask. Party candidate is Joe Hargrave, who’s running against the NDP’s Shayne Lazarowich, Liberal Winston McKay and Asia Yellowtail of the Green Party.

Prince Albert Northcote, where the Sask. Party’s Victoria Jurgens beat NDP incumbent Darcy Furber by less than 200 votes in 2011. Local issues have included the long-running clamour for a second bridge across the North Saskatchewan River near the city. NDP Leader Cam Broten recently visited the city to flag what he sees as Sask. Party vulnerability on this issue, plus health care and government job cuts. Can this be exploited by Nicole Rancourt (NDP), Liberal Jonathan Fraser or Tracey Yellowtail (Green Party)?

Cumberland, a sprawling northern seat where the Sask. Party’s Thomas Sierzycki faces off against the NDP’s Doyle Vermette. Vermette is a veteran MLA who got 63.2 per cent of the vote in the 2011 election; Sierzycki has the profile that comes with being the mayor of La Ronge and got his nomination almost two years ago. Also contesting this seat are Mick Taylor-Lessard (Green Party) and George Morin (Liberal).

Rosthern-Shellbrook, where the NDP’s Rose Freeman faces off against incumbent Scott Moe of the Sask. Party — plus Orrin Murray Greyeyes (Liberals) and Jade Duckett (Greens). Historical twist: the Sask. Party’s Dennis Allchurch held this riding from 1999-2011, when he lost a nomination meeting to Moe, who went on to get 65 per cent of the votes vs. vs. 31.8 for the NDP. Freeman is the president of the Shellbrook Chamber of Commerce.

Saskatchewan Rivers, which covers the area to the north and east of Prince Albert. In it, Saskatchewan Party incumbent Nadine Wilson faces the NDP’s Lyle Whitefish. Though the NDP has held this seat in the recent past, in 2011 Wilson notched 66 per cent of the vote vs. the NDP’s 31.2 per cent. Brenda McKnight (Liberal) rounds out the field.

Finally, watch any rural seat where a long-sitting MLA has retired. By coincidence, all were previously in the Sask. Party category: Wood River (D.F. “Yogi” Huyghebaert), Melville-Saltcoats (Bob Bjornerud), Estevan (Doreen Eagles), Cypress Hills (Wayne Elhard), Kelvington-Wadena (June Draude), Canora-Pelly (Ken Krawetz) and Moosomin (Don Toth).

http://thestarphoenix.com/news.....skatchewan
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 31, 2016 8:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

March 30, 2016 3:16 pm Updated: March 30, 2016 11:11 pm

High turnout for first day of advance voting in Sask. election

David Giles, Senior Web Producer By David Giles
Senior Web Producer Global News


Voter turnout was significantly higher on the first day of advance voting in the 2016 Saskatchewan election compared to the last election. Elections Saskatchewan says 24,602 people cast a ballot on Tuesday.

That compares to 16,096 on the first day of advance voting in the 2011 provincial election.

However it didn’t all go smoothly.

There were some lineups at voting locations, mainly in urban locations, and 24 teams of election workers were called in to meet the demands.



“We had expected some voters to be anxious to cast their ballot and show up to vote the minute the doors opened at 3:00 on the first day,” Dr. Michael Boda, chief electoral officer of Saskatchewan, said in a release.

“We had planned for an increased advance poll turnout as this is the first provincial election where advance voting is open to everyone—not just voters who won’t be in their home constituency on election day.”


http://globalnews.ca/news/2608.....-election/
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 01, 2016 7:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Decided voters strongly favour Saskatchewan Party days before election: poll




Saskatoon StarPhoenix Saskatoon StarPhoenix
More from Saskatoon StarPhoenix

Published on: March 31, 2016 | Last Updated: March 31, 2016 9:18 AM CST


Saskatchewan Party leader Brad Wall (L) and NDP leader Cam Broten square off for the Leaders Debate at the Regina CBC headquarters, March 23, 2016.

Saskatchewan Party leader Brad Wall (L) and NDP leader Cam Broten square off for the Leaders Debate at the Regina CBC headquarters, March 23, 2016. Bryan Schlosser / Regina Leader-Post



As the provincial election campaign nears its conclusion, support for the Saskatchewan Party remains consistently high.

According to an Insightrix poll released Thursday, 60 per cent of decided voters said they plan on supporting the Saskatchewan Party. The NDP has 30 per cent of intended voters, while five per cent said they will vote Liberal, and three per cent each said they plan on voting Green Party or Progressive Conservative.

In the 2011 election, the Sask. Party earned 64.3 per cent of the vote, while the NDP received 32 per cent. That translated to 49 seats for the Sask. Party and nine for the NDP, its worst showing in three decades.

The overall results are virtually unchanged from an Insightrix poll conducted two weeks ago, when decided voters overwhelmingly favoured the Sask. Party (61 per cent) over the NDP (29 per cent). In a poll three weeks ago, 57 per cent of decided voters favoured the Saskatchewan Party, while 29 per cent were for the NDP.





The biggest shift has come in Regina, according to Insightrix.

“While the two major parties were in a statistical tie in the Queen City as recently as two weeks ago, our latest poll suggests that the Sask. Party has pulled ahead since Easter,” Insightrix said in its news release.

In this week’s poll, 50 per cent of decided voters were in favour of the Saskatchewan Party (up from 44 per cent in mid-March), while 38 per cent said they are voting for NDP, and eight per cent for the Liberals.

In Saskatoon, 55 per cent of decided voters in Saskatoon said they are voting for the Sask. Party, compared to 35 per cent for the NDP and eight per cent for the Liberals.

In southern Saskatchewan, 68 per cent of decided voters said they are voting Sask. Party, compared to 23 per cent for the NDP and two per cent for the Liberals.

In northern Saskatchewan, 61 per cent said they are voting for the Saskatchewan Party, 28 per cent said they are voting for the NDP and six per cent said they will vote for the Liberals.

A total of 1,500 randomly-selected SaskWatch Research panel members participated in the study from March 28-30.

•••••

Turn to The StarPhoenix for complete 2016 Saskatchewan election coverage. Tune in for live results, live streaming from election headquarters, thoughtful analysis and more. Visit our website at http://www.thestarphoenix.com.

http://thestarphoenix.com/news.....ction-poll
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 01, 2016 7:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

March 31, 2016 7:39 pm Updated: April 1, 2016 7:34 am

Sask Party, NDP target indigenous voters in provincial election

Ryan-Kessler-November-2015 By Ryan Kessler
Reporter Global News


SASKATOON – The two leading parties in the Saskatchewan provincial election are courting a previously untapped source of votes, according to one political studies professor at the University of Saskatchewan (U of S).

“Frankly, both parties ought to be commended about their attention to aboriginal and First Nations and Métis issues in this province,” said Greg Poelzer of the U of S.



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Recent visits to La Ronge by both Saskatchewan Party Leader Brad Wall and NDP Leader Cam Broten show how seriously each party takes the indigenous vote, Poelzer said.

“The northern administration district is 86 per cent aboriginal – very high percentage of aboriginal population. In fact, it’s the highest area of aboriginal people in Canada. It’s even larger than Nunavut,” Poelzer said.

FULL COVERAGE: Decision Saskatchewan 2016

Both parties have made promises related to education, skills training and employment that would benefit Indigenous people. The NDP has specifically promised to fill a funding gap for schools on reserves and then bill the federal government.

“But that raises some big challenges, of course. What happens if the feds don’t pick up the bill? Then the province is on the hook,” Poelzer said.

Maintaining a healthy relationship with the federal government will be key to improving life for aboriginal people in Saskatchewan, Poelzer added.

Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations (FSIN) Chief Bobby Cameron said he’d like to see the winner of the provincial election address health, infrastructure and education issues on reserves.

“We have one school in particular where there’s pipes showing, there’s wires showing. It’s a potential hazard,” Cameron said.

The head of the FSIN said he’s confident indigenous people, a group with historically low voter turnout, will cast ballots.

“The mobilization is there. You look at the federal election. It happened,” Cameron said.

http://globalnews.ca/news/2611.....-election/
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 01, 2016 5:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sask. Party heading for easy majority and historic third term for Wall: Mainstreet poll




D.C. Fraser
More from D.C. Fraser

Published on: April 1, 2016 | Last Updated: April 1, 2016 4:40 PM CST


Ayaz Fiaz snaps a selfie with Saskatchewan Party leader Brad Wall, left, during a Saskatchewan Party rally in Regina on Friday April 1, 2016. The Saskatchewan provincial election takes place Monday, April 4.

Ayaz Fiaz snaps a selfie with Saskatchewan Party leader Brad Wall, left, during a Saskatchewan Party rally in Regina on Friday April 1, 2016. The Saskatchewan provincial election takes place Monday, April 4. Michael Bell / THE CANADIAN PRESS



Is this provincial election the easiest to call? It is, according to Mainstreet Research’s latest poll for Postmedia News.

The final poll before Monday’s election calls for an easy Saskatchewan Party victory, which again would give Brad Wall a majority government and make him the longest-serving non-NDP premier in modern Saskatchewan history.

Mainstreet surveyed a random sample of 1,509 Saskatchewan residents for the poll on Thursday.

When asked who they would vote for if the election were held today, 54 per cent said it would be the Sask. Party. That number goes to 58 per cent if you include those who said they are leaning toward the party.





The NDP would have picked up 28 per cent of voters, according to the poll, and slightly more — 31 per cent — when considering those leaning toward voting orange.

Quito Maggi, president of Mainstreet, believes the NDP lost an opportunity early in the election. In the first week, when the two parties had a smaller margin between them, NDP Leader Cam Broten stumbled, said Maggi.

“When that opportunity came, they went the whole first week under attack, firing candidates and firing the campaign manager.” said Maggi. They “just never really recovered from that.”

Maggi noted that during the recent federal election, despite huge swings elsewhere, Saskatchewan remained stable in its support for the Conservative Party.

That’s also been the case in this provincial election, as Wall’s party has led in every Mainstreet poll conducted.

“There is not going to be a swing or a huge surge; there is nothing pointing to that possibility over the weekend,” said Maggi. “Barring an act of God, I couldn’t even tell you what it would require.”

NDP leader Cam Broten was in Martensville in the Venture Heights Elementary School playground with candidate Jasmine Calix speaking to the funding difficulties in the Prairie Spirit School division and how, if elected, he will hire more teachers and educational assistance, March 29, 2016.

NDP leader Cam Broten was in Martensville speaking to the funding difficulties in the Prairie Spirit School division and how, if elected, he will hire more teachers and educational assistance, March 29, 2016. Gord Waldner / Saskatoon StarPhoenix

For pollster Maggi, there is little mystery remaining.

“The only real question left is ‘Will there be some apathy among Saskatchewan Party supporters because they’ve been leading pretty overwhelmingly?’” he said, adding that could make a difference in a handful of seats.

Even there, though, Maggi gives the advantage to Wall.

“Turnout will matter, but the Saskatchewan Party has the bigger organization, the bigger machine, the better-organized machine,” he said.

It appears the Sask. Party was able to gain ground over the final weeks of the campaign. In a poll conducted on March 17, 48 per cent of the 1,577 people contacted said they’d support the party if the election were held that day. The NDP is trending in the opposite direction. In that same poll, 32 per cent said they would support Broten’s party.

There are still 12 per cent of voters who said they are undecided, but Maggi said most were likely unwilling to say who they’ll vote for, and only three to four per cent are legitimately undecided.

“That is a very, very low number,” he said.

There’s a chance of the Green Party or Liberal Party picking up a seat. The Greens polled at four per cent and the Liberals at three per cent.

“That, in itself, would be a huge accomplishment and, I think, would change the dynamics of the legislature,” said Maggi.

The poll was conducted by reaching people on a mix of land lines and cellphones. The margin of error was plus or minus 2.72 per cent, 19 times out of 20.

Regina still a battleground:

While the Saskatchewan Party has widened its margin across the province, the NDP is still within striking range in the provincial capital.

Five per cent separates the two parties, with 42 per cent of people saying they’d vote for the Saskatchewan Party and 37 per cent for the NDP.

In Regina, the margin of error was plus or minus 4.37 per cent, 19 times out of 20.

Saskatoon sees NDP in tough

As it has been throughout the election, the NDP trails more in Saskatoon than it does in Regina. Forty-eight per cent of people there said they’d vote for the Sask. Party, while 32 per cent pledged their ballot to the NDP.

In Saskatoon, the margin of error was plus or minus 4.39 per cent, 19 out of 20 times.

http://thestarphoenix.com/news.....treet-poll
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 02, 2016 8:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

14 ridings up for grabs in Saskatoon




Andrea Hill, Saskatoon StarPhoenix
More from Andrea Hill, Saskatoon StarPhoenix

Published on: April 1, 2016 | Last Updated: April 1, 2016 6:24 PM CST


Competing election signs show conflicting opinions within a home in the Churchill Wildwood area.

Competing election signs show conflicting opinions within a home in the Churchill Wildwood area. Gord Waldner / The StarPhoenix



The rejigging of riding boundaries and the loss of an incumbent candidate means at least half a dozen provincial ridings in Saskatoon could shape into interesting races.

The city will send 14 politicians to Regina, two more than in 2011. The last election saw eight Saskatchewan Party and four NDP MLAs chosen to represent the Bridge City. All but one are running again.

University of Saskatchewan political science professor Joe Garcea said the NDP has far more to lose than the Saskatchewan Party. Adding seats to urban centres traditionally benefits left-of-centre parties, and if the NDP can’t at least hold its four seats in Saskatoon, it will be a “really significant” blow to the party, he said.

Incumbent NDP candidates are running in Saskatoon Centre (David Forbes), Saskatoon Nutana (Cathy Sproule), Saskatoon Riversdale (Danielle Chartier) and Saskatoon Westview (party leader Cam Broten).





Neither Sproule nor Chartier — first-time MLAs — won by significant margins in 2011.

Sproule won by 503 votes while Chartier edged ahead of the Saskatchewan Party candidate by only 300 votes. By comparison, Saskatchewan Party MLA Don Morgan, who won his Saskatoon Southeast riding by the city’s largest margins in the last election, took 6,005 more votes than the NDP candidate.

Neither Saskatoon Nutana nor Saskatoon Riversdale were greatly affected by riding redistribution, and both Sproule and Chartier could be in for tight competitions.

Forbes, who has held his riding since 2001, gained some NDP-friendly territory through riding redistribution and will likely have an easier time seeking re-election than his two female colleagues, Garcea said.

Though Broten’s Westview riding has, since the last election, swallowed up territory that’s traditionally gone to the Saskatchewan Party, Garcea said he isn’t worried about the NDP leader’s chances; it’s rare for party leaders to lose their seats.

Seven incumbent Saskatchewan Party candidates are gunning to return to the Legislature in the ridings of Saskatoon Eastview (Corey Tochor), Saskatoon Fairview (Jennifer Campeau), Saskatoon Meewasin (Roger Parent), Saskatoon Northwest (Gordon Wyant), Saskatoon Silverspring Sutherland (Paul Merriman), Saskatoon Southeast (Don Morgan) and Saskatoon Willowgrove (Ken Cheveldayoff).

Longtime candidates who took their seats with at least 70 per cent of the vote in 2011 — Wyant, Morgan and Cheveldayoff — are expected to win again, Garcea said.

Meanwhile, the first-time MLAs who beat out NDP incumbents in the last election — Tochor, Campeau and Parent — could see tougher races. Campeau, who won by the city’s narrowest margins in 2011, beat NDP incumbent Andy Iwanchuk by just 247 votes.

No incumbents are running in Saskatoon Churchill-Wildwood, Saskatoon Stonebridge-Dakota or Saskatoon University, all of which encompass areas that elected Saskatchewan Party representatives in 2011.


http://thestarphoenix.com/news.....-saskatoon
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 02, 2016 8:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

10 candidates to watch in Saskatchewan's election

5 Sask. Party candidates and 5 NDP candidates to watch on April 4

By Stefani Langenegger, CBC News Posted: Apr 02, 2016 5:30 AM CT| Last Updated: Apr 02, 2016 5:30 AM CT

Advanced polling stations are open throughout the week from 3 p.m. to 10 p.m. CST until April 2.


Stefani Langenegger
Reporter



CBC asked both the Saskatchewan Party and the NDP to highlight some of their high-profile, up-and-coming political candidates in this campaign, excluding former cabinet ministers.
■Results dashboard: customize and personalize your election night

Here are five from each of the parties.

Saskatchewan NDP

Ted Jaleta (Regina Coronation Park) describes himself as someone who's been a "runner, prisoner, refugee, immigrant, world-class athlete, coach, leader and motivational speaker."

After being imprisoned and tortured during Ethiopia's civil war, Jaleta came to Canada as a refugee.

He said he's spending the rest of his time here giving back as a coach of a running group as well as through the Open Door Society.

Ted Jaleta
Ted Jaleta is running for the NDP in Regina Coronation Park. (NDP)

Karen Purdy (Moose Jaw Wakamow) is a licensed practical nurse and active union member.

She was also the subject of a controversial remark by Conservative MP Tom Lukiwski, who either said he would work to help incumbent Greg Lawrence defeat the "NDP horde" running against him, or something more personal, depending who you ask.



Karen Purdy
Karen Purdy is the NDP's candidate in Moose Jaw Wakamow. (NDP)

Nicole Rancourt (Prince Albert Northcote) is a social worker who specializes in mental health services through the Prince Albert Parkland Health Region.

She is active in her union. In 2008, Nicole received the Rebel with a Cause award from the Elizabeth Fry Society for her work with women behind bars.

Nicole Rancourt
Nicole Rancourt is the NDP's candidate in Prince Albert Northcote. (NDP)

Nicole Sarauer (Regina Douglas Park) is a young lawyer who gave up her job at a law firm to work for a charity which provides free legal representation to those who otherwise could not afford it.

She is a school trustee as well as a volunteer with the Regina Sexual Assault Centre and the YWCA Big Sisters program.

Nicole Sarauer
Nicole Sarauer is the NDP's candidate in Regina Douglas Park. (NDP)

Nicole White (Saskatoon Meewasin) has been a reporter in rural Saskatchewan as well as a community activist in Saskatoon.

She has worked with AIDS Saskatoon, served as chair of the Saskatoon Police Advisory Committee on Diversity and has volunteered with the Saskatoon Diversity Network.

Nicole White
Nicole White is running for the NDP in Saskatoon Meewasin. (NDP)













​Saskatchewan Party

Tina Beaudry-Mellor (Regina University) is known for her work as a teacher in the department of Politics and International Studies at the University of Regina.

In that role, she brought many students to the Legislature to watch politics in person, by taking in the speech from the throne as well as the budget.

She also volunteers and has served as the chair of Equal Voice, a group dedicated to electing more women.

Tina Beaudry-Mellor
Tina Beaudry-Mellor is the Sask. Party's candidate in Regina University. (Sask. Party)

CJ Katz (Regina Douglas Park) is a business owner with a passion for the food industry.

She describes herself as "a food writer, TV cook, food stylist, photographer and storyteller."

She is host of Wheatland Cafe, a cooking show on local television.

CJ Katz
CJ Katz is the Sask. Party's candidate in Regina Douglas Park. (Sask. Party)

Gene Makowsky (Regina Gardiner Park) is best known for his 17 years playing on the offensive line for the Saskatchewan Roughriders.

When he wasn't in the field, he was in the classroom as a substitute teacher in Regina's public schools. Makowsky was first elected as an MLA in 2011. He lives in Regina with his wife and three sons.

Gene Makowsky
Gene Makowsky is the Sask. Party's candidate in Regina Gardiner Park. (Sask. Party)

Eric Olauson (Saskatoon University) has been on Saskatoon's city council since 2012, where he is not afraid to vote against the majority whether it's to oppose a smoking ban or mandatory civic spending on public art.

During the provincial election campaign, it was revealed that Olauson is one of five candidates with a previous history of impaired driving.

Eric Olauson
Eric Olauson is running for the Sask. Party in Saskatoon University. (Sask. Party)

Thomas Sierzycki (Cumberland) is one of the country's youngest elected officials. He was voted onto La Ronge town council when he was 18 and elected mayor at 21.

Now, he's hoping to break into an NDP stronghold in one of the province's two most northern seats.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/.....-1.3514913
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