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RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Oct 15, 2012 5:50 pm    Post subject: Dalton McGuinty stepping down as Ontario premier Reply with quote

( this story just broke so alot more to come , not clear why he was steping down . is also a federal liberal leaders job open . he is also proroging the legislature . i don't know who is going to replace him . definity seems like the provincial liberals days of government at queen's park are numbered )

Dalton McGuinty stepping down as Ontario premier

Allison Cross | Oct 15, 2012 6:28 PM ET | Last Updated: Oct 15, 2012 6:45 PM ET
More from Allison Cross | @AllisonCross


Fred Chartrand / The Canadian Press

Dalton McGuinty announced in an emergency caucus meeting Monday evening that he’s stepping down as Ontario’s premier.

“After 16 years as leader of the Ontario Liberal party, and after nine years as premier, it’s time for renewal,” he said to a room packed with members of the Liberal caucus and members of the media.

“It’s time for the next Liberal premier. It’s time for the next set of Liberal ideas to guide our province forward.”

He said he asked the president of the party to convene a leadership convention “at the earliest possible opportunity,” adding that he will continue to serve as premier until a new leader is elected.

Related
Scott Stinson: Hudak sees opportunity in Dalton McGuinty’s union problems

Dalton McGuinty urges PCs, NDP to search their consciences before contempt vote

McGuinty also announced he is proroguing Ontario’s legislature in order to negotiate wage freezes with the province’s labour partners. He said he intends to reach out to the Opposition to get their support for legislation that would make wage freezes possible.

“To this end, I met with the Lieutenant Governor earlier today to ask that we prorogue the House so that we can pursue both discussions, both tracks, in a way that is free of the heightened rancour that has sadly, too frequently characterized our legislature of late,” McGuinty said.

More to come


http://news.nationalpost.com/2.....o-premier/
Bugs





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PostPosted: Tue Oct 16, 2012 12:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I guess this is 'smart' ... the detestable worm runs the province into the ground, and then runs away from any final accounting.

Who's going to pick up that sow's ear and turn it into a silk purse?
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Tue Oct 16, 2012 9:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Its a lowdown move;
But politically its beyond brilliant.

It basically delays the contempt vote in the legislature, and creates an entire newscycle of "win he or won't he run" taking at least some eyes off the mess that is floating around.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Tue Oct 16, 2012 10:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good point.

But it only adds to the image of a desperate and cornered rat, trying to jump off the ship ... into the safety of another level of government. All that fresh cheese ...
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Oct 16, 2012 3:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

his announement will change the channel for the time being but it comes across as very desperate .
there seems to be a realisation that it was time for him to move on but his decision to close the legislature for what could be months is going to leave a bad taste in voters minds for a while .
whoever becomes the new leader has a big hole to dig out of . and leaves us with the realistic possibility of an ndp government replacing the liberals at queens park in the near future .
chilipepper





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PostPosted: Tue Oct 16, 2012 4:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I wonder if he has something up his sleeve though and is playing games. It's good move politically speaking and gives him and the party time to get their ducks in order. I can't believe there isn't more to this than meets the eye.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Oct 17, 2012 10:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:
his announement will change the channel for the time being but it comes across as very desperate .
there seems to be a realisation that it was time for him to move on but his decision to close the legislature for what could be months is going to leave a bad taste in voters minds for a while .
whoever becomes the new leader has a big hole to dig out of . and leaves us with the realistic possibility of an ndp government replacing the liberals at queens park in the near future .


Do you really think so?

People pay so little attention to provincial politics that it's hard to imagine. That's part of the reason that the civil service unions have such force -- they can win an election for you, as they have with Dalton's gang.

My suspicions are that the chickens are coming home to roost. My bet? There are a couple of other potential scandals coming down the pike, and Dalton has decided to punt ... and call for a time-out, so far as Parliament is concerned. It makes taking the risk of running for the federal Liberal leadership. It's all good so far as Dalton is concerned.
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Oct 18, 2012 11:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

chilipepper wrote:
I wonder if he has something up his sleeve though and is playing games. It's good move politically speaking and gives him and the party time to get their ducks in order. I can't believe there isn't more to this than meets the eye.



whats odd he is that he hasn't actually resigned only made his intention public and that was somehow justification for closing the legislature for months ?
he is still the mpp for Ottawa South and has a seat in the legislature and still the liberal leader until the new one chosen. the whole thing seems a bit bizare , i could only imagine the media fallout if Harper attempted the same thing . we can still remember the progration protests in ottawa and what he did then was way less than what Dalton did this week .
Bugs





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PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2012 12:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

While it's true, without a doubt, that the media would treat a Conservative politician very differently from a Liberal one enacting the same policies, that is something unlikely to change until some measure of professionalism is brought into journalism ... which, frankly, I don't see happening anytime soon.

The creep has the right to resign. The real problematic here is that he has prorogued Parliament for an indefinite period of time. That's what real professional journalists would be exploring right now -- digging up new facts, inserting new questions in interviews, etc to explore the background to this decision.

Sadly, we don't have journalists of that calibre.
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2012 2:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
While it's true, without a doubt, that the media would treat a Conservative politician very differently from a Liberal one enacting the same policies, that is something unlikely to change until some measure of professionalism is brought into journalism ... which, frankly, I don't see happening anytime soon.

The creep has the right to resign. The real problematic here is that he has prorogued Parliament for an indefinite period of time. That's what real professional journalists would be exploring right now -- digging up new facts, inserting new questions in interviews, etc to explore the background to this decision.

Sadly, we don't have journalists of that calibre.


The problem is that the right to Prorogue Parliament is a political tool at the hands of every Provinces top politician as well as Canada's.

My issue is not with the reporting now;
but more so then.

Harper shut down Parliament on the cusp of an ill fated opposition coup that would have resulted in an election without question.

McGunity shutdown Parliament to avoid his Energy Minister to be found in contempt of Parliament.

Where are the pro-democracy protestors now?
Where are the droves of Arts Majors with their signs and slogans?

Using a tool at your disposal that is fully legal to do so isn't the issue, the problem is that in 2008 the media portrayed the prorogue of Parliament as some odd never been done before thing that Harper invested; yet now its "common place"

It is amazing how so many in the media who were utter and totally inept with how Parliament worked a few years ago now appear to be Constitutional scholars?
Bugs





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PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2012 10:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Responding to Cosmo ...

Yeah, Harper used 'proroguing' to save his government, almost immediately after an election, and crucially, English-speaking Canadians overwhelmingly felt they were being betrayed if they ended up with a coalition that shared power with separatists.

He was acting under a threat in a way that had the broad support of the public at the time. Everyone understood. The effect of public opinion was immediate, and powerful.

The public changed everything in a way that it wouldn't happen again. It played a role in sending the Liberals on another notch down, to third party status. The Bloc effectively ended its post referendum de facto reconciliation with Canada, and disappeared. We aren't going to have any of that anymore.

But Dalton's use of the process isn't like that. He wants to make his escape before all the skeletons tumble, like zombies, from his closets. You mention the Energy Ministry. There's also this expensively bogus 'green economy'. There are probably other things. He reminds me of George Smitherman, getting out while he still could, leaving Health as he had left Education ... victims of boondoggles and frauds ...

Dalton doesn't need MPs having a forum, and question periods ... with reports to examine ... and all of that ... nor while he'll be facing all the tough slugging involved in imposing wage freezes on the civil service. In fact, that may be the one ray of sunshine in all of this. Premier Dad can be tough without Syd Ryan crawling up his political ass. It may even be settling a score.

He's just running away and abandoning the public ...

Small to the very end.
Progressive Tory





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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 8:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

So the next premier will be...
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 9:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
Responding to Cosmo ...

Yeah, Harper used 'proroguing' to save his government, almost immediately after an election, and crucially, English-speaking Canadians overwhelmingly felt they were being betrayed if they ended up with a coalition that shared power with separatists.

He was acting under a threat in a way that had the broad support of the public at the time. Everyone understood. The effect of public opinion was immediate, and powerful.


I am failing to see a difference;

The reality is that the GG at the time was a potential loose canon with little clear understanding of her position (Which is why I suspect she was replaced with a Constitutional Scholar) and could have very well granted the government to this coalition without need for an election as it was within her right.

Harper prorogued to save his government, McGunity ultimately did the same.

Public opinion is a nice qualifier, but the reality is that it does not change the reasoning behind it.

Harper was lucky enough to have the public backlash at the inclusion of Gille Duceppe, but if they don't and Dion doesn't bumble his TV address the situation in January unfolds very differently.

While I agree that McGuinty's tact is sleazy its well within his right to do so.

Much like Harper's situation its up to the opposition to decide their reaction to this;

Dion, Layton, and Duceppe folded, and the Liberals quietly abstained to pass Harper's budget in 2009.

If Hudak and Horwath want to hold the former Premier accountable then enough with the Micheal Ignatieff-esk "smartest guy in the room" Parliamentary tact pertaining to "contempt of this" and "Parliamentary investigation of that" and promise to dissolve government at first opportunity.

They cannot hold a proper investigation from the opposition benches, they can only hold political kabuki theater from there.

I am tired of the theater;

If there is zombies in the closet then I expect Hudak and Horwath to share a stage and declare the only way to fully investigate this is from the government side of the aisle and its up to Ontario voters to decide if they want that.

Period.
reidjr





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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 3:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Back when Harper did this there were demands of we want democracy there were protests yet when Dalton does it well i have heard very little from protesters and i think thats what concerns me.
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Tue Oct 23, 2012 4:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

reidjr wrote:
Back when Harper did this there were demands of we want democracy there were protests yet when Dalton does it well i have heard very little from protesters and i think thats what concerns me.


In all fairness folks from the left tend to have far more free time.
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Dalton McGuinty stepping down as Ontario premier

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