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chilipepper





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PostPosted: Sat May 22, 2010 8:50 am    Post subject: The Rise Of The Religious Right Reply with quote

I'm sure you've all read about Marci McDonald's book of paranoia, Armageddon, well here's another piece buying into it.

As much as I would not be happy to see radical 'theo-cons' take over gov't, I don't see it happening. This is just more fear mongering by the left which people dutifully buy into.

http://www.montrealgazette.com.....story.html
Quote:
"I don't want to raise fears or to demonize Christians or anyone of any faith," she said in an interview. "What I want people to do is take a careful look at policies we see these days and understand what's going on."

What's happening, she suggests, is that the Harper Conservatives - in small part out of personal conviction and in larger part out of political calculation - have embraced the religious right as a bedrock component of their electoral base and are pandering to them with a range of policies that are dear to the evangelical forces but run against the liberal grain of modern Canadian social policy and attitudes.

She cites the raising of the sexual consent age to 16 from 14, the rejection of a national daycare plan in favour of family allowances, the elimination of the court challenges program that served as a vehicle for gay rights campaigners, and the Harper government's uncritical support of the Israeli hard line. Since her book went to print, there has been the government's refusal to provide abortion funding as part of its G8 motherhood support initiative, funding cuts for left-leaning women's groups and gay pride events.

In Ontario, evangelical crusader Charles McVety and his "theo-con" Institute for Canadian Values are credited with generating the public backlash that got the provincial government to backtrack on its plan to introduce sex education at the lower elementary school level.
potan





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PostPosted: Sat May 22, 2010 8:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just replace the word "Christian" with "Jew" or "Muslim" and no publisher in Canada would have allowed this book to be published.
chilipepper





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PostPosted: Sat May 22, 2010 9:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It does appear that hatred against Christians is the last acceptable prejudice.
kwlafayette





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PostPosted: Sat May 22, 2010 7:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is a tad overstated, I am afraid.
Habsrwfan





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PostPosted: Sat May 22, 2010 8:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I find the issues brought up to be eyebrow-raising.

You have to be a Christian to object to 14 year olds sleeping with people in their 20s (or older)?

You have to be a Christian to think that a National Daycare program is an overly costly idea?

You have to be a Christian to think that Canada should be supportive of the longest running democratic nation in the middle east?

You have to be a Christian to think that funding abortions in foreign countries is not a prudent use of government money during a worldwide recession?


I'm not familiar with the court challenges program, but it strikes me that there are perfectly secular arguments supporting each of the four positions that I posed as questions. Indeed, at least two of them you can support on purely libertarian stands (i.e. shrink the size of government, and reduce government spending).

You know, in all of this I'm very disappointed in libertarians. A lot of the issues being attributed to the "Christian right" are really issues that libertarians should be claiming as their own. Less government spending in very discretionary areas like National Day Care and foreign abortion funding should be winning issues for libertarians; they should be loudly supporting this.

I'd frankly like to know why they're not more vocal in saying "Hey! I like those stands by Harper simply on libertarian grounds. You don't have to be Christian to support those stands".
potan





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PostPosted: Sun May 23, 2010 12:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Habsrwfan wrote:
I find the issues brought up to be eyebrow-raising.

You have to be a Christian to object to 14 year olds sleeping with people in their 20s (or older)?

You have to be a Christian to think that a National Daycare program is an overly costly idea?

You have to be a Christian to think that Canada should be supportive of the longest running democratic nation in the middle east?

You have to be a Christian to think that funding abortions in foreign countries is not a prudent use of government money during a worldwide recession?


I'm not familiar with the court challenges program, but it strikes me that there are perfectly secular arguments supporting each of the four positions that I posed as questions. Indeed, at least two of them you can support on purely libertarian stands (i.e. shrink the size of government, and reduce government spending).

You know, in all of this I'm very disappointed in libertarians. A lot of the issues being attributed to the "Christian right" are really issues that libertarians should be claiming as their own. Less government spending in very discretionary areas like National Day Care and foreign abortion funding should be winning issues for libertarians; they should be loudly supporting this.

I'd frankly like to know why they're not more vocal in saying "Hey! I like those stands by Harper simply on libertarian grounds. You don't have to be Christian to support those stands".


Exactly. As an evangelical myself, I don't consider these issues to be exclusively ours. I think there's a pretty good libertarian, totally secular argument that could be made in favour of the right to life. I also think a secular albeit non-libertarian argument could be made for keeping marriage between one man and one woman as made here: http://tech.mit.edu/V124/N5/kolasinski.5c.html Wanting to raise their own kids rather than the state doing it for them is definitely not something only evangelicals believe in. And of course, as you mentioned, there is the fiscal argument that government just shouldn't be spending taxpayer dollars like this.
Habsrwfan





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PostPosted: Sun May 23, 2010 2:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

potan wrote:
Habsrwfan wrote:
I find the issues brought up to be eyebrow-raising.

You have to be a Christian to object to 14 year olds sleeping with people in their 20s (or older)?

You have to be a Christian to think that a National Daycare program is an overly costly idea?

You have to be a Christian to think that Canada should be supportive of the longest running democratic nation in the middle east?

You have to be a Christian to think that funding abortions in foreign countries is not a prudent use of government money during a worldwide recession?


I'm not familiar with the court challenges program, but it strikes me that there are perfectly secular arguments supporting each of the four positions that I posed as questions. Indeed, at least two of them you can support on purely libertarian stands (i.e. shrink the size of government, and reduce government spending).

You know, in all of this I'm very disappointed in libertarians. A lot of the issues being attributed to the "Christian right" are really issues that libertarians should be claiming as their own. Less government spending in very discretionary areas like National Day Care and foreign abortion funding should be winning issues for libertarians; they should be loudly supporting this.

I'd frankly like to know why they're not more vocal in saying "Hey! I like those stands by Harper simply on libertarian grounds. You don't have to be Christian to support those stands".


Exactly. As an evangelical myself, I don't consider these issues to be exclusively ours. I think there's a pretty good libertarian, totally secular argument that could be made in favour of the right to life. I also think a secular albeit non-libertarian argument could be made for keeping marriage between one man and one woman as made here: http://tech.mit.edu/V124/N5/kolasinski.5c.html Wanting to raise their own kids rather than the state doing it for them is definitely not something only evangelicals believe in. And of course, as you mentioned, there is the fiscal argument that government just shouldn't be spending taxpayer dollars like this.


Agreed.

I truly do think that Harper made some of these moves with libertarians in mind. He felt that these were issues that social conservatives and libertarians could genuinely agree on, and hence that these would be issues that could strengthen the bond of the big tent CPC party. But libertarians seem to be too concerned with the "why?" behind each policy and not enough with what the policy actually means. Cuts in discretionary spending are cuts in discretionary spending, no matter what motivates them. The result is less government spending, which libertarians ought to love.
mrsocko





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PostPosted: Thu Jun 10, 2010 8:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anyone who accuses Christians of supporting Israel is an antisemite. I did not know that was something to be accused of. :?
chilipepper





Joined: 18 Feb 2007
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 12, 2010 7:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good piece here exposing Marci McDonald for the liar she is.

http://josephbenami.com/index......;Itemid=34
Enough already! My response to Marci McDonald
Thursday, 10 June 2010
Quote:

It has been several weeks since the book The Armageddon Factor was released, igniting a storm of controversy that author Marci McDonald says she neither intended, nor anticipated. Perhaps so, but one gets the feeling that she’s not entirely unhappy with the attention. What really bothers her, she says, is the invective that has been directed her way since the book’s publication. And now she’s fighting back…and she’s using me to do so.

In a column published by the Ottawa Citizen June 9, McDonald tells how I greeted her with a “massive bear hug” prior to appearing on a CTV panel together. The implication is clear: Marci McDonald remains a good friend of one of the two (according to the Toronto Star) official “spinmeisters” of Canada’s conservative movement, and a Jew at that – Joseph Ben-Ami.

Except - the above episode never happened. When McDonald and I greeted one another before our joint appearance on CTV’s Power Play, all we did was touch cheeks gently, as standard a greeting between a man and a woman as shaking hands is between two men. That she would portray such a common and innocuous gesture as a “massive bear hug” illustrates a disturbing willingness to adjust facts to fit her personal narrative. This would be fine if she were Dan Brown (author of The Da Vinci Code) but she's not. She's supposed to be a serious journalist and her book, a serious work of journalism.

It's not the first time McDonald has misrepresented our relationship when promoting her book.
cont.
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The Rise Of The Religious Right

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