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Edmund Onward James





Joined: 04 Jun 2009
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 04, 2009 11:02 pm    Post subject: A petite Warrior/Medic wins the Military Cross Reply with quote

Kate Nesbitt is first woman in Royal Navy to receive Military Cross... bravo!

Courage amid gunfire - Peter Worthington
http://www.torontosun.com/news.....6-sun.html

KATE NESBITT GETS HER MILITARY CROSS
http://www.express.co.uk/posts.....litary-Cro
Mac





Joined: 02 Sep 2006
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Location: John Baird's riding...

PostPosted: Sat Dec 05, 2009 12:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What an awesome story! Well done, Kate Nesbitt!!

-Mac
Edmund Onward James





Joined: 04 Jun 2009
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 05, 2009 7:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

At times Mac, I am humbled. I write about warriors and what they risk, but was never a soldier. If it hadn't been for the allies, I would have never been born. My parents were forced labourers from Ukraine and Belarus. They met in a camp, work farm etc, but not quite like the concentration camps, fell in love and voila. I was born in Germany. My father came here first, got a job, worked night an day so he could bring us over; plus he had to wait for approval. I was little over a year-old.

When my mother tells me about her days there, the fear, I cringe and... always appreciate our veterans, the veterans of America, Britain, Poland, Australia, some of the French and so on...

Indeed, I wonder if I would have run to help in harm's way. Like Kate Nesbitt and all of the allies around the world.

Bravo Kate! Bravo!
Mac





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votes: 35
Location: John Baird's riding...

PostPosted: Sat Dec 05, 2009 8:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We never know our strength until it's tested, Edmund.

My first choice was the Armed Forces but my flat feet meant I failed the physical. Instead, I went into policing which is just as dangerous in it's own way.

-Mac
IanM





Joined: 28 Jan 2009
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Location: The centre of the universe

PostPosted: Sun Dec 06, 2009 2:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mac is correct,

however it is not an instant test.

It takes a lot, a lot of personal reflection to enter into a recruiting office, it takes even more to actually take the oath.

The Military gives a certain set of values. It does so from day one. Forget what you see in recruiting ads, that is only a hook. Part of military life is understanding selflessness. They work as a group, you learn the importance of the role that you play, to your country, to the armed forces, and to others.

Think about it, before you go overseas. They train you, before you do your job in the military, you spend at least six months training, being immersed in a value set. That value set lets you understand concepts such as duty, loyalty, honour, trust, friendship.

They also make no issue out of the fact that ultimately, you are expendable, ultimately you could die or be seriously wounded. That is a hard thing to swallow, trust me. They make sure you understand what the life is really like. If you don't like it, well you can always release. They don't want people who will not be able to hack it. If you can't hack it on courses, they will fail you. If your heart really isn't in it, they will let you release.

Instructors on courses are posted in from units. They also will tell you, if you don't make the standard, then passing you only hurts their friends, only serves to lessen effectiveness.

There is also the fact of military training. It works slowly, very slowly. You may look at a Military course and wonder why it is so long, or so comprehensive. You may watch basic training videos and see minutae being so important. They start by letting you crawl, and then letting you walk, and then letting you run.

One big thing with this is that you slowly become acustomed to it over time. I released a few years ago and I still keep my hair short, pack my clothes a certain way, still carry a pen and pad of paper, polish boots, act in a certain way. It becomes second nature.

As time goes on, and a person works their way through the training system, enviromental adaptation is begun. Again it works at slow low levels and moves up. Eventually being out in the rain late at night, on a saturday doesn't seem that bad. Nor does the fact that you may be up for twenty four, forty eight or seventy two hours constantly moving. They allow you to build up a tollerence to discomfort.

With that enviromental adaptation is an immersion to weapons, pyrotechniques and stress. Things are done quickly, things are done with weapons and simulators, eventually progressing to blank ammunition and finally of course live fire excerises.

Once you are confident with yourself, and have experienced it, it doesn't seem so bad. Carrying a weapon becomes second nature, hearing thunder flashes and blank being fired off, or firing off rounds on a range isn't as fearful.

People look back at their training fondly often times. Yes, it does suck at the time, but you do end up a stronger person as a result. What you may have thought was impossible isn't.

Once you get to your unit of course, the training progresses and you master more and more concepts.

Finally, an operational tour is on the horizon. So pre deployment training starts, again at the basic level, to confirm a level of knowledge, finally moving up quickly to all levels and phases, with lots of field time, lots of ammo and lots of experience and skills to be taught. Currently right now it runs about six months, and they make sure that the people who are going, aren't going to be coming home needlessly.

So, why do people do it? Why do people still get up and go over the top so to speak? It isn't easy of course to face the fact that you may die, or you may be seriously impacted.

Simple, loyalty, and duty. Yes, it sounds rather primitive to say. However everyone in the military has loyalty, otherwise they could go make more money elsewhere for far less work. Loyalty to the Crown, the Armed Forces, their Regiment, their friends, it is different for others. Duty is the same.

Also, it is a part of the game, and they make no issue or take no excuses for it. Combat is what the military does. That isn't going to change.

You develop a great sense of community there, much more than any socialist would ever dream of. People will give you their last cigarette if you need it, or their last magazine, or help carry you back. Why, because they know that if it was reversed that you would do the same for them. One of the biggest things in the military is that people who steal, or lie or cheat other members are not looked favorably upon, and have been known to be dealt with outside of the system.

They are people who willingly give up a lot of themselves, if not themselves completely to others. Some of the mottos of units express this, I can quote a few, but rather I will link it. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L.....by_country
Mac





Joined: 02 Sep 2006
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Location: John Baird's riding...

PostPosted: Mon Dec 07, 2009 9:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

An excellent essay, Ian. RCMP training leave many of the same imprints but with more focus on law than weapons. I do look back on training fondly. I understand training nowadays isn't the same and I wonder if that's a good thing...

-Mac
IanM





Joined: 28 Jan 2009
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 07, 2009 9:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I found this quote,

A Veteran-whether active duty, retired or Reserve- is someone who at one point in their life, wrote a blank cheque made payable to "The Country of Canada" for an amount of "up to and including my life" Author Unknown

It pretty much sums up the nature of the contract with the armed forces.

The police are different, as the police don't have the obligation of unlimited liability involved with the armed forces.

I look back at my training fondly as well. I was lucky, I was able to get the end of the cold war, two up one back, hot meal on the objective. As well as the more modernized training.

Ultimately, people do talk about the nature of the training changing. It is going to. The demographics and people change. One thing we all have to understand is that training is only a baseline, and is only there to give certain skills and competencies. It is not written in stone from upon high. If that was the case we'd be dressing in red jackets and lining up to give musket fire. Or within the RCMP's context, riding around the west on horses.

Ultimately there is base standards for both groups, and yes, they are the base. Someone can scrape a pass and still be effective according to the system. We also have to remember that both the armed forces, and the RCMP have changed, especially in the last 100 years. Of course, there is a unique relationship between the RCMP and the Canadian Forces. (No 1 Provost Company RCMP anybody? On that note, I believe that traditionally RCMP officers ranked as commissioned officers in the armed forces?

Training ultimately serves two purposes. One, to teach a required set of skills, and two, to further the development of the member. Thus, we need to adapt training and skills to further these aims. That is why there is always boards meeting to update training material, courses etc.

A good read on training is 'Training Canada's Army' (A military publication located at http://armyapp.forces.gc.ca/ae.....FP-001.pdf ) and 'Training to Fight and Win' by General Beno (http://www.artillery.net/new/colcmdttrainingtofightintro1.html). I have paper copies of both, and they are both good reads. Of course, the Basic Officer Training Course pre-course package (About 120 pages) has an in depth discussion of everything one needs to know about leadership in peace and war.
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A petite Warrior/Medic wins the Military Cross

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