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RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Nov 10, 2009 3:44 pm    Post subject: Gilles Taillon asks for another ADQ leadership race Reply with quote

Newly elected Action Democratique du Quebec Leader Gilles Taillon speaks to supporters in Quebec City on October 18, 2009. REUTERS

Gilles Taillon asks for another leadership race and calls in police to investigate party

Quebec — The Globe and Mail
Published on Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2009 2:10PM EST

Last updated on Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2009 2:39PM EST


.Facing a mutiny of his caucus, Action démocratique du Québec Leader Gilles Taillon called a new leadership race 23 days after being elected – then dropped a bombshell by calling-in the police to investigate dubious funding practices in the party.

“I found some troubling things in the party's financing practices since 2003 and I've asked the Sûreté du Québec to investigate.” Mr. Taillon said.

According to a source close to the party, Mr. Taillon was “booted-out” as leader by his caucus after a meeting Tuesday morning.

“You can be sure he won't be a leadership candidate in the next race,” said the source, who asked to be named.

Mt. Taillon made a brief statement and refused to answer any questions.

“I will stay on since I am the legitimate leader,” Mr. Taillon said, arguing that that his real margin of victory was three votes over his main rival, Éric Caire. “I intend to stay on as leader until the next leader is chosen.”

The move comes just days after Friday's stunning announcement by two of caucus members, who quit the ADQ.

Mr. Caire, who came in second by a single vote in the leadership race, left the caucus to sit as an independent along with Marc Picard.

This left the ADQ with only four MNAs.

Two more caucus members, Gérard Deltell and Janvier Grondin threatened to quit as well if Mr. Taillon didn't leave.

As for Mr. Caire, he said that despite the new developments he has no plans to return to the ADQ and has no intentions to run again for its leadership.

“Mr. Taillon has done irreparable damage to the ADQ,” he said. “I don't know how the party will recover from this. I can't see the party going through a second leadership race. The last none almost destroyed us.”


http://www.theglobeandmail.com.....le1358090/


it appears were witnessing the death of the ADQ ? or maybe after all this it can somehow repair itself . only time will tell .
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Tue Nov 10, 2009 5:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What a mess,

Mario Dumont was responsible for about 80% of the creditability of the Provincial Party, and Éric Caire and Marc Picard were responsible for about 19%.

Which leaves Gilles Taillon and the rest of the ADQ grab bag to share the 1%.

Gilles Taillon asking for a new race, without Caire is pointless.
Now you have Gérard Deltell not sure if he will remain with the party?

Yowza.

If Éric Caire and Marc Picard are looking for work, I am sure we can find ridings for them in the Eastern Township federally,
mr12387





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PostPosted: Tue Nov 10, 2009 5:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We could put Eric Caire in Louis-Hébert and Gérard Deltell in Portneuf-Jacques Cartier (depending on what happens with Andre Arthur).

As for Grondin and Picard, their seats are currently Conservative federally and I think moving them anywhere else would be a bad idea. Yesterday proved that it takes a strong local candidate to win in rural Quebec.

As for the demise of the ADQ, I don’t think it’s a bad thing at all. I think the Liberal Party of Quebec, with some reform, has enough room for people from the centre left to the right of both staunch federalist and staunch nationalist (autonomist) persuasions. With these people united, it will be much easier to fend off the PQ.
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Wed Nov 11, 2009 1:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mr12387 wrote:
We could put Eric Caire in Louis-Hébert and Gérard Deltell in Portneuf-Jacques Cartier (depending on what happens with Andre Arthur).

As for Grondin and Picard, their seats are currently Conservative federally and I think moving them anywhere else would be a bad idea. Yesterday proved that it takes a strong local candidate to win in rural Quebec.

As for the demise of the ADQ, I don’t think it’s a bad thing at all. I think the Liberal Party of Quebec, with some reform, has enough room for people from the centre left to the right of both staunch federalist and staunch nationalist (autonomist) persuasions. With these people united, it will be much easier to fend off the PQ.


I may need to pick your brain since you know the lay of the land,
There seems to be a lot of overlap in the sense that parts of three provincial riding's may find their way into one federal riding, is there a federal riding that at all overlaps onto Picard's current provincial riding?
mr12387





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PostPosted: Wed Nov 11, 2009 7:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:

I may need to pick your brain since you know the lay of the land,
There seems to be a lot of overlap in the sense that parts of three provincial riding's may find their way into one federal riding, is there a federal riding that at all overlaps onto Picard's current provincial riding?


Well for starters whereas Quebec has 75 federal ridings it has an additional 50 provincial ridings (i.e. 125 ridings). The federal vs. provincial riding maps have nothing to do with each other. That being said, federal ridings can compose any number of provincial ridings or portions of provincial ridings. Sometimes the federal borders are about spot on in incorporating provincial ridings; in other regions the provincial and federal borders may have no relation whatsoever. One thing I find as well, due to the increased number, provincial ridings are more accurate in representing distinct regions. For example Les Iles de la Madeleine, despite their small population, have their own provincial riding. Another example would be the federal riding of Montmorency-Charlevoix-Haute-Cote-Nord which comprises two regions that are rather distinct from one another and are barely contiguous.

As for Picard’s riding, it’s 100% in the territory of Conservative MP Jacques Gourdes riding of Lotbinière--Chutes-de-la-Chaudière.
potan





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PostPosted: Thu Nov 12, 2009 9:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This guy single handedly ruined the ADQ. I still think there needs to be a viable right-wing party in Quebec.
thurmas





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PostPosted: Thu Nov 12, 2009 10:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

and potan he did it all in 23 days
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Thu Nov 12, 2009 12:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mr12387 wrote:
cosmostein wrote:

I may need to pick your brain since you know the lay of the land,
There seems to be a lot of overlap in the sense that parts of three provincial riding's may find their way into one federal riding, is there a federal riding that at all overlaps onto Picard's current provincial riding?


Well for starters whereas Quebec has 75 federal ridings it has an additional 50 provincial ridings (i.e. 125 ridings). The federal vs. provincial riding maps have nothing to do with each other. That being said, federal ridings can compose any number of provincial ridings or portions of provincial ridings. Sometimes the federal borders are about spot on in incorporating provincial ridings; in other regions the provincial and federal borders may have no relation whatsoever. One thing I find as well, due to the increased number, provincial ridings are more accurate in representing distinct regions. For example Les Iles de la Madeleine, despite their small population, have their own provincial riding. Another example would be the federal riding of Montmorency-Charlevoix-Haute-Cote-Nord which comprises two regions that are rather distinct from one another and are barely contiguous.

As for Picard’s riding, it’s 100% in the territory of Conservative MP Jacques Gourdes riding of Lotbinière--Chutes-de-la-Chaudière.


Darn,
I guess at least Eric Caire in Louis-Hébert has a chance to win us that riding back?
mr12387





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PostPosted: Thu Nov 12, 2009 5:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
Darn,
I guess at least Eric Caire in Louis-Hébert has a chance to win us that riding back?


With his name recognition, I think he has a huge shot. But, if and only if, he's commited to the idea of Canada. Any flirting with the PQ or BQ in the next while on his part would be an automatic deal breaker for me. We don't need another Lucien Bouchard.
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Thu Nov 12, 2009 5:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mr12387 wrote:
cosmostein wrote:
Darn,
I guess at least Eric Caire in Louis-Hébert has a chance to win us that riding back?


With his name recognition, I think he has a huge shot. But, if and only if, he's commited to the idea of Canada. Any flirting with the PQ or BQ in the next while on his part would be an automatic deal breaker for me. We don't need another Lucien Bouchard.


I fully agree,
Simply because I don't think we need Quebec to secure a majority anymore.

However if he is committed, it would be nice to have some more household names running in Quebec.
mr12387





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PostPosted: Sat Nov 14, 2009 3:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

On the topic of household names, if the ADQ is really about to go belly up, there are two additional possible recruits from current MNAs, other than Deltell and Caire, both of which I think are great catches.

Slyvie Roy, has been the MNA from Lobtiniere for almost 7 years. Her town of Sainte-Sophie-de-Lévrard, where she was mayor from 1999-2003, is actually in the federal riding of Bas-Richelieu—Nicolet—Bécancour and not Conservative MP Jacques Gourde’s riding of Lotbinière—Chutes-de-la-Chaudière.

Francois Bonnardel, who has been the MNA for Shefford since the 2007 election when the ADQ became the official opposition, could be our candidate in either Shefford or Brome-Missisquoi as he has connections to both federal ridings. He was a potential ADQ leadership hopeful and is dating a popular long-time Liberal MNA in the Gaspe region (Nathalie Normandeau) where the Conservatives fared rather well in the 2006 federal election. Perhaps we could kill two birds with one stone and convince her to run for us in Gaspésie - Îles-de-la-Madeleine as well.

As an aside, I also wish we could somehow recruit ex-Liberal MNA turned federal Liberal candidate, Nancy Charest in Haute-Gaspésie - La Mitis - Matane – Matapédia. I think her popularity combined with the reasonably large federalist and Conservative base in the riding could really win it for us.
mr12387





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PostPosted: Sat Nov 14, 2009 4:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

P.S. There are certain regions of Quebec where the Conservatives have some reasonably good chances of election victories. The key is to know what type of Conservatives to run in what ridings.

As a general rule:

Western Quebec, Gaspesie, Bas-Saint-Laurent and the Eastern Townships are more suitable for people who support the PLQ.

Chaudiere-Appalaches, and Capitale-Nationale are more suitable for ADQ types.

Centre-du-Quebec and Mauricie could go both ways depending on the candidate.
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Mon Nov 16, 2009 4:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mr12387 wrote:


Slyvie Roy, has been the MNA from Lobtiniere for almost 7 years. Her town of Sainte-Sophie-de-Lévrard, where she was mayor from 1999-2003, is actually in the federal riding of Bas-Richelieu—Nicolet—Bécancour and not Conservative MP Jacques Gourde’s riding of Lotbinière—Chutes-de-la-Chaudière.



Hmmmmmm,
Do you think she could beat Louis Plamondon in Bas-Richelieu—Nicolet—Bécancour? Louis Plamondon has been in office since 1984.

If the Tories could take that riding it would be a huge win.
mr12387





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PostPosted: Thu Nov 19, 2009 8:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Gerard Deltell named new leader of the ADQ

The Canadian Press

Updated: Thu. Nov. 19 2009 5:42 PM ET

QUEBEC — Gerard Deltell, the new leader of the Action democratique du Quebec, faces a mountain to climb in re-establishing the crippled party as a credible political force.

The right-leaning party has been devastated in the past year by a disastrous election performance, the resignation of its new leader after less than a month on the job, and two defections from its six-member caucus.

The party has also been rocked by allegations by Gilles Taillon, Deltell's predecessor, that the party's books are rife with financial irregularities.

But the 45-year-old Deltell, a longtime TV journalist first elected in last December's general election, is confident he can help lead the party back to respectability.

He told a news conference Thursday he will continue pursuing the party's centre-right, provincial-autonomist vision in which the sovereignty debate gets shelved in favour of other issues like revamping Quebec's economy.

"We have to get the job done -- and we will," Deltell said in Quebec City after being named the new ADQ leader.

"It's not a good situation and I recognize that."

Deltell, a former political reporter who worked for Radio-Canada, TVA and TQS, succeeds Taillon, whose tumultuous leadership lasted less than a month.

Taillon triggered a firestorm of controversy when he recently said a conspiracy hatched between the federal Tories and influential members of his own party led to his demise.

In a scathing open letter, Taillon said his decision to sever ties with the federal Conservatives and create an autonomous provincial party prompted a harsh response from the party's old guard, including former leader Mario Dumont.

Deltell was coy when asked whether he would re-establish ties with the federal Tories. He acknowledged he was a member of the old Progressive Conservative party in the early 1980s, just like Premier Jean Charest.

He was more affirmative when asked where he stood on the national question.

While the ADQ once campaigned for independence, in the party's infancy in the mid-1990s, Deltell suggests his view of Canada is similar to that of Newfoundland's Danny Williams.

"I am not a sovereigntist," Deltell said.

"I am an autonomist. An autonomist means what? It means we shall respect the power of the province and we shall respect the power of the national government. That is autonomy.

"You know in some other provinces, like Newfoundland, you have a little kind of autonomist. And we can learn from them."

As for the fundraising improprieties raised by Taillon, Deltell said he has not been contacted by Quebec provincial police about any investigation and would not stand in the way of one.

Deltell was the consensus choice of his three remaining caucus colleagues to lead the party. He also had the blessing of Dumont, who stepped down as leader earlier this year after the ADQ's poor electoral performance last December.

"Mr. Deltell is a very good leader," said Francois Bonnardel, one of the four ADQ caucus members.

"He will be able to prepare a new beginning for our party. We have three years in front of us to make Quebecers a credible political offer."

To rebuild the battered brand, Deltell said the ADQ must develop beyond its stronghold of Quebec City.

"So many people wrote so many times (about) the death of so many politicians," he said. "Just watch us.

"Let me be clear with you. During the last 10 days or the last week, I received hundreds of emails, saying `If you do it well, I will get back'."
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Gilles Taillon asks for another ADQ leadership race

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