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FF_Canuck





Joined: 02 Sep 2006
Posts: 3360
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votes: 17
Location: Southern Alberta

PostPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2008 2:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Craig wrote:
It is well documented - though most attribute it to better nutrition rather than evolution.


Indeed. In the middle ages, the common height for a man was around 5'6" (IIRC), but nobles were frequently taller (eg. King Edward I, aka Edward Longshanks, was 6'2"). A more contemporary example is Korea - South Korean men are on average 5.5" taller than North Korean men.

And as others have stated, the mechanics of natural gene selection are very well documented, perhaps mosty notably with the Peppered Moths of England.
urbanmonk





Joined: 12 Jul 2007
Posts: 307
Reputation: 16.8Reputation: 16.8
votes: 5

PostPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2008 7:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

FF_Canuck wrote:

In the middle ages, the common height for a man was around 5'6" (IIRC), but nobles were frequently taller

I remember touring a historical community {Kings Landing) here in NB a few years ago. As we went from home to home I noticed that most of the stairways were narrow and low, also I thought it odd that most of the beds appeared to be for children. When I asked our guide about this she told me that due to nutrition and illness in the 1800s most of our settlers were smaller, thus the smaller furniture and passageways.
Interesting place to visit if ever in NB...
mrsocko





Joined: 29 Oct 2006
Posts: 2463
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votes: 8
Location: Southwestern Ontario

PostPosted: Wed Jul 02, 2008 9:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The best society is a secular democratic society that respects religion. A secular society gets it values from somewhere. These values did not just appear out of an aetheistic vacuum. It takes alot of the best points from religion, philosphy, literature, fosters discussion of the best of these traits and forms a concensus of which are acceptable to the majority of its citizens.
Any secular society that does not respect religion is doomed to excesses of cruelty and ultimate faiure if it does not change(CCCP). Theocracies are some of the cruelest governments on earth.

In a secular society there should be a tension and balance between the selfish desire of humanity and the moral imperatives of religion and philosophy. In Canada the selfish desires are winning out.
Sheila





Joined: 09 Feb 2008
Posts: 556
Reputation: -6.8
votes: 16
Location: Central Alberta

PostPosted: Thu Jul 03, 2008 12:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

mrsocko wrote:
A secular society gets it values from somewhere. These values did not just appear out of an aetheistic vacuum.


I guess you've never heard of Hamorabi's Law?
mrsocko





Joined: 29 Oct 2006
Posts: 2463
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votes: 8
Location: Southwestern Ontario

PostPosted: Thu Jul 03, 2008 9:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Code of Hammurabi (Codex Hammurabi), the best preserved ancient law code, was created ca. 1760 BC (middle chronology) in ancient Babylon. From Wikipedia

Quote:
It was enacted by the sixth Babylonian king, Hammurabi.[1] Earlier collections of laws include the codex of Ur-Nammu, king of Ur (ca. 2050 BC), the Codex of Eshnunna (ca. 1930 BC) and the codex of Lipit-Ishtar of Isin (ca. 1870 BC).[2]

At the top of the basalt stele is a bas-relief image of a Babylonian god (either Marduk or Shamash), with the king of Babylon presenting himself to the god, with his right hand raised to his mouth as a mark of respect.[1] The text covers the bottom portion with the laws written in cuneiform script. It contains a list of crimes and their various punishments, as well as settlements for common disputes and guidelines for citizens' conduct. The Code does not provide for an opportunity for explanation or justification, though it does imply one's right to present evidence. The stele was displayed for all to see; thus, no man could plead ignorance of the law as an excuse. However, in that era few people except scribes could read. For a summary of the laws, see Babylonian law.


Hammurabi was religious.


Last edited by mrsocko on Mon Jul 07, 2008 10:25 pm; edited 1 time in total
Sheila





Joined: 09 Feb 2008
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Location: Central Alberta

PostPosted: Fri Jul 04, 2008 11:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What religion was he?
FF_Canuck





Joined: 02 Sep 2006
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Location: Southern Alberta

PostPosted: Mon Jul 07, 2008 10:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hammurabi and his contemporaries were followers of a polytheistic religion that was predominant in Mesopotamia at the time. There's not really a label like Christianity or Buddhism associated with it. Each region usually had its own patron diety - Marduk was the patron of Babylon, while Shamash was the Assyro-Babylonian God of Justice.
Flax





Joined: 15 Mar 2009
Posts: 16


PostPosted: Mon Mar 16, 2009 12:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

One of my concerns is the increasing use of human rights tribunals to silence evangelical Christians. Religious freedom needs to be preserved.
chrisreid





Joined: 29 Oct 2006
Posts: 182
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votes: 5
Location: Melbourne, Australia

PostPosted: Mon Mar 16, 2009 3:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well the problem is that "secularism" has been usurped by athiests. Athiests use the term to hide their agenda which is to remove religion from all facets of public view.

The concept of secularism, and separation of church and state, was to separate bishops, and the religious authority from everyday governance. Separation of church and state is a concept to avoid the establishment of a national church, or to state that every citizen is now a member of such and such religion, by virtue of simply being a citizen.

One interesting thing is that "separation of church and state" is not a part of the Canadian Constitution or Charter of Rights. The Queen is our head of state, and is also the head of the church of england - technically Anglicanism is the Canadian national religion.

Now I don't support that, but nor do I support the athiest manipulation of the term secularism. A legislature can full well vote to say a prayer of any choice they want. The Premier or Prime Minister or the members of parliament are not a clergy or church. They are not saying that one must be catholic/muslim/jewish to sit in the legislature.

Secularism means that people are free to express their faith or non-faith freely, that doesn't mean forcing all people who whole religious belief to check their beliefs at the door should they choose to run in politics. After all, they get voted in, its the public who decides in the end.

mrsocko wrote:
The best society is a secular democratic society that respects religion. A secular society gets it values from somewhere. These values did not just appear out of an aetheistic vacuum. It takes alot of the best points from religion, philosphy, literature, fosters discussion of the best of these traits and forms a concensus of which are acceptable to the majority of its citizens.
Any secular society that does not respect religion is doomed to excesses of cruelty and ultimate faiure if it does not change(CCCP). Theocracies are some of the cruelest governments on earth.

In a secular society there should be a tension and balance between the selfish desire of humanity and the moral imperatives of religion and philosophy. In Canada the selfish desires are winning out.
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