Home FAQ Search Memberlist User Groups Register Login   

BloggingTories.ca Forum IndexBloggingTories.ca Forum Index
    Index     FAQ     Search     Register     Login         JOIN THE DISCUSSION - CLICK HERE      

*NEW* Login or register using your Facebook account.

Not a member? Join the fastest growing conservative community!
Membership is free and takes 15 seconds


CLICK HERE or use Facebook to login or register ----> Connect



  

Post new topic   Reply to topic Page 1 of 1
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Craig
Site Admin




Joined: 29 Aug 2006
Posts: 4415
Reputation: 47.8Reputation: 47.8Reputation: 47.8Reputation: 47.8Reputation: 47.8
votes: 36

PostPosted: Tue Oct 24, 2006 10:44 am    Post subject: Melting pot as weapon against extremism Reply with quote

Interesting article in the Christian Science Monitor that compares jihadism in europe vs. the USA. The conclusion is essentially this: multiculturalism breeds terrorism while the melting pot diffuses it...

Quote:
NEW YORK The Islamist radicalism that inspired young Muslims to attack their own countries - in London, Madrid, and Bali - has not yielded similar incidents in the United States, at least so far.

"Home-grown" terror cells remain a concern of US law officers, who cite several disrupted plots since 9/11. But the suspects' unsophisticated planning and tiny numbers have led some security analysts to conclude that America, for all its imperfections, is not fertile ground for producing jihadist terrorists.

To understand why, experts point to people like Omar Jaber, an AmeriCorps volunteer; Tarek Radwan, a human rights advocate; and Hala Kotb, a consultant on Middle East affairs. They are the face of young Muslim-Americans today - educated, motivated, and integrated into society - and their voices help explain how the nation's history of inclusion has helped to defuse sparks of Islamist extremism.

"American society is more into the whole assimilation aspect of it," says New York-born Mr. Jaber. "In America, it's a lot easier to practice our religion without complications."...

Jaber, the AmeriCorps volunteer, who is studying to become a medical doctor, says he has not experienced anti-Muslim bias. In part, he says, that may be because he doesn't have an accent or look particularly Middle Eastern - his father is Palestinian and his mother Filipino. But he also credits America's melting-pot mentality, as does Ms. Kotb, the Middle East consultant.

"We weren't isolated growing up. We were part of the culture," says Kotb, who grew up outside Washington in a family that inculcated a success ethic. "Religion was important, but not so much that you'd have to cover your head or if you don't pray five times a day, that's it - nothing like that. There were a lot more progressive attitudes" within her local Muslim community.

In mosques in America, it's fairly common for imams to preach assimilation, says Mr. Zogby. That's not as true in Europe, particularly in poorer neighborhoods where sermons can be laced with extremism.

"The success of ... Saudi-inspired religious zealotry in Europe was in large part because the Saudis put up the money to build mosques and pay for imams," says Ian Cuthbertson, a counterterrorism expert at the World Policy Institute at the New School for Social Research. "The American Muslim community was rich enough not to require Saudi money to build its mosques."

In Europe, it's estimated that millions of second- and third-generation Muslims have not been well assimilated in their adopted countries, so have little or no fealty to either the European country they live in or the one their parents were born in. "They are much more susceptible to the Internet, returning jihadist fighters, and extremist imams," says Thomas Sanderson of the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington. "There's no doubt that Europe has an incubator environment and we have a somewhat sterile environment for radicalism."...


http://www.jihadwatch.org/archives/013713.php
PostPosted: Tue Oct 24, 2006 10:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Read Mark Steyn's new book
CC Scott





Joined: 02 Sep 2006
Posts: 151
Reputation: 15.9Reputation: 15.9
Location: Edmonton

PostPosted: Tue Oct 24, 2006 12:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not only does it breed terrorism, but also crime in other ethnic communities. Just look at the problems that cities like Toronto, Edmonton, and Vancouver are having with gangs right now.
biggie





Joined: 06 Sep 2006
Posts: 1738
Reputation: 44Reputation: 44Reputation: 44Reputation: 44
votes: 10
Location: Ottawa, Ontario

PostPosted: Tue Oct 24, 2006 2:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

CC Scott wrote:
Not only does it breed terrorism, but also crime in other ethnic communities. Just look at the problems that cities like Toronto, Edmonton, and Vancouver are having with gangs right now.


Well yeah, it promotes segregation..
jnarvey





Joined: 04 Sep 2006
Posts: 47
Reputation: 17.2Reputation: 17.2
Location: Vancouver

PostPosted: Sat Nov 04, 2006 5:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Not only does it breed terrorism, but also crime in other ethnic communities. Just look at the problems that cities like Toronto, Edmonton, and Vancouver are having with gangs right now.

So... you prefer your gangsters Caucasian? There will always be criminal gangs. Multiculturalism is not the issue.

Look at Japan, a country with zero immigration and about as homogenous a population as one could realistically hope for. They not only have crime, but one of the most heavily organized gangs in the word.

Of course there are ethnic gangs in our big cities. But suggesting that closed-off immigrant communities are the cause of a crime wave is just not so useful.
FF_Canuck





Joined: 02 Sep 2006
Posts: 3360
Reputation: 73.4
votes: 17
Location: Southern Alberta

PostPosted: Sun Nov 05, 2006 12:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

They may not cause a crime wave, but they certainly amplify its effects. Police also have huge problems investigating and preventing crimes in these communities due to their isolationist tendancies.
Post new topic   Reply to topic Page 1 of 1

  


 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Melting pot as weapon against extremism

phpBBCopyright 2001, 2005 phpBB