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cbasu





Joined: 03 Sep 2006
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 2006 8:08 am    Post subject: Is the PMO tone deaf on Quebec? Reply with quote

The always interesting Chantal Hebert argues that the Harper administration's Quebec tone deafness could be the reason for the Bloc to want a Spring election. In other words, Duceppe wants to go early because Harper's policies - coupled with a new Liberal leader - may drive Quebec voters back to the Liberals if he waits too long.

In an October 6/06 Toronto Star article entitled 'Why Bloc likely itching for Spring election' Chantal Hebert wrote:
(Unabridged, emphasis added) The Bloc Québécois clearly wants an election sooner rather than later, a wish that makes an election campaign in the first half of next year a near-certainty.

By tracing an early line in the sand on the amount he wants to see transferred to Quebec next year as part of a deal on the fiscal imbalance, Gilles Duceppe has just about locked himself into a plan to vote against the 2007 budget.

While a spring election probably suits Stephen Harper's planning, you have to wonder why Duceppe wants one so badly. It has never been his style to paint himself into a corner.

If he is acting out of character, it is because, with every passing week, his MPs are getting more heat for keeping the Conservatives in power.

Only last spring, Duceppe had reason to fear that the Tories would overtake the Bloc in the next election. But now he is more concerned that a backlash against Conservative policies will send his supporters straight into the embrace of the next Liberal leader.

This fall, Michael Ignatieff, Stéphane Dion and Bob Rae all have more presence in Quebec than Harper's ministers. None of the Quebec members of the Conservative cabinet has emerged as a strong voice. On the contrary, there are reasons to question their influence.

If they had any of the latter, they would have stopped the minority government from proceeding with some of the cuts announced last week. If the Conservatives wanted a lot of bang for the relatively few bucks saved in the process, they certainly achieved their purpose. In Quebec, that bang was overwhelmingly negative.

A government that had solid intelligence on Quebec would have known that literacy has been a big deal in the province since Jacques Demers, the last coach that brought the Stanley Cup to the Montreal Canadiens, wrote a book about life without basic reading and writing skills.

It would have thought long and hard before eliminating the federal Courts Challenge Program that has allowed francophone minorities across Canada to assert their constitutional rights.

Not so long ago, the program financed an Ontario legal battle to keep Montfort, the only French-language university hospital west of Quebec, open. It has not escaped attention in Quebec that the federal ministers who killed the program last week used to be part of the Ontario government that tried and failed to close down Montfort.

More than six months into his tenure in the Senate, Michael Fortier has yet to select a riding to run in.

It is not for lack of trying; for weeks, the party has been looking for a good riding for the government-appointed public works minister.

The search is taking a long time because none of the ridings in and around Montreal looks promising for a Tory candidate. If Fortier had to run in one of the seats on his short list tomorrow, his career in federal politics would come to an end.

As Harper's former campaign co-chair and as someone who was offered a shortcut into the cabinet, Fortier has no option other than to follow through on his commitment to run in the next campaign. But the high-profile Quebecers the Conservatives are courting for the next election are under no obligation to sign on as sacrificial lambs.

It will be hard for anyone of stature in Quebec to go into an uphill election under the triple burdens of the extended Afghan mission, the abandoned Kyoto Protocol and the plan to scrap the long gun registry. But it will be even harder to find successful Quebecers who want to run for a party that caters to a social conservative wing.

If there is one mix that tends to repel Quebec voters, it is that of religion and government. Talk of a "Defence of Religions Act" will do even more damage to the Conservatives in Quebec than their opposition to same-sex marriage itself.

These days, it is easier to list the ridings that the Liberals will likely hold or take in Quebec in the next election than to find the seats that would make up the difference between a minority and a majority for the Conservatives.

Duceppe is worried that Harper's Quebec window may turn into a Liberal back door — and the Prime Minister should be too.

I am not sure I have enough raw data to agree with Ms Hebert's analysis, but a majority government without adding to the Quebec tally would seem highly unlikely.


Last edited by cbasu on Sat Oct 07, 2006 2:06 pm; edited 1 time in total
biggie





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PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 2006 8:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

hehehe.. interesting how they claim "tone-deaf" to quebec just because this is the first primeminister in years to not bow to their every whim..
kulvahs
Guest








PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 2006 9:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

i am curious why this was not put with my Quebec post as its what i was talking about?

as we will see Quebec is key to any majority of any importance.

the reason is pretty clear if we cant even get along by contributing to each others threads and topics.

sorry i am not trying to be ignorant ,only point out some things.

if you want to cripple Duceppe,,,all Harper has to say is

NO PENALTIES FOR ADULT USE OF CANNABIS

and the Conservatives will for sure have a big presence.
most Canadians agree on everything else they say,,its the cannabis use and minimum sentences for it that are driving a lot to get political


i am not sure if this is the right place for this but have a look at this post i just received.

there will be lots of these types eventually when we break down the media wall against us. i know its not Quebec but it is the same thing happening all over and the conservatives look closed minded on the issue. Nova Scotia is relevant as this is an issue being ignored and marginalized when it could be helping people.

3-10 million is a lot of votes to ignore and still win a majority in this country.

and good morning every one.




Support for pot oil closes legion
Officials temporarily suspend Maccan branch's charter
By CATHY VON KINTZEL Truro Bureau

MACCAN - Provincial Royal Canadian Legion officials have shut down their
Maccan branch for supporting use of a homemade marijuana oil that some local
members claim saves lives and relieves suffering.

But an ousted executive member says he's not backing down.

"They can take our charter off the wall but they can't run from the truth,"
Rick Dwyer of Maccan said in a telephone interview Thursday.

"We're a watchdog to make sure human rights, freedom of speech and democracy
are protected. This medicine is so phenomenal."

Mr. Dwyer, 51, calls the marijuana oil a safe, natural, cancer-curing
substance that is being withheld from the public by a corrupt government and
powerful pharmaceutical companies.

The Nova Scotia/Nunavut Command of the Royal Canadian Legion temporarily
suspended the Maccan legion's charter Wednesday, ousted its executive and
intends to appoint a new management committee.

Provincial command chairman Steve Wessel is well aware of the strong support
for the oil and its local producer, Rick Simpson, in the rural Cumberland
County area outside Amherst but he said the legion name, insignia and
buildings cannot be involved.

At issue was the legion members' hosting and promoting of public meetings
regarding the oil and its benefits, despite repeated warnings to cease. A
meeting planned for the legion on Wednesday was moved to a nearby ball
field.

"The Royal Canadian Legion has a very good reputation in the general public
and we don't want to soil that reputation by making it look like we're
backing something that clearly is against the law at this point," Mr. Wessel
said.

Mr. Dwyer, who is past president of the Maccan legion branch, said the
action trampled members' rights.

"We are the real Canadian legion," he said.

"I'm so proud of the members for standing up and defending this. We will not
stand by and watch the outright genocide of the Canadian people."

Mr. Dwyer has investigated Mr. Simpson's claims about the healing powers of
his homemade oil, has read affidavits and research and has interviewed
patients, many of whom he knows personally.

He said his 82-year-old father with lung cancer began consuming the oil in
June after he was given 48 hours to live. He's still alive.

Mr. Dwyer and other legion members made no secret of their support for Mr.
Simpson's oil and notified the provincial command and local politicians.

"When we see the government doing something wrong, it's our duty to stand up
and say so," he said.

Mr. Simpson, who is fighting drug charges in court due to his
marijuana-growing activities, makes the yellowish grease-like medicine by
extracting essential oils from the leaves and buds of marijuana plants.

He gives it away.

"It's a simple herbal remedy that's non-addictive" and cures cancer and
other diseases, he said, adding patients don't get high if they take it in
small regular doses.

Maccan legion president George Theal wasn't surprised by the provincial
command's move and hopes the facility can reopen by next week.

Mr. Theal was not as vocal as Mr. Dwyer and didn't want to wade into the
politics of the issue. He reflected mainly on the legion's importance in the
community.

"It's used for bingo and for having fundraisers when people need
assistance," he said, adding there are no other community halls in the area.

( cvonkintzel@herald.ca)

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Attachment: http://drugsense.org/temp/part588.html


Last edited by kulvahs on Fri Oct 06, 2006 11:02 am; edited 1 time in total
Mac





Joined: 02 Sep 2006
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 2006 9:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kulvahs wrote:
i am curious why this was not put with my Quebec post as its what i was talking about?

I would say you answered your own question. cbasu wanted to talk about something OTHER than marihuana prohibition.

-Mac
kwlafayette





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PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 2006 10:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quebec is no longer key to anything. Their taxation policies have chased out business, their lavish social spending is taking them deep into debt, there are more people in BC and Alberta now. The fact is that within a few decades, Quebec will be an economic backwater if they stick to the universal childcare, government is responsible for everything path that they are on now.

I think in the future, we will see hear less and less about Quebec. The day of Quebec primacy in Canadian politics hass passed.
Mac





Joined: 02 Sep 2006
Posts: 5500
Reputation: 104
votes: 35
Location: John Baird's riding...

PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 2006 1:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kwlafayette wrote:
I think in the future, we will see hear less and less about Quebec. The day of Quebec primacy in Canadian politics hass passed.

Hard to say. I'm a big fan of Quebec although I don't always agree with their politics. I keep hoping they'll change things around and become a force for good!

-Mac
cbasu





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PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 2006 5:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quebec sends 75 MPs to Ottawa -- that's almost the entire seat total of Atlantic Canada + Alberta + Man + Sask.

In my book, that's influence.
biggie





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PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 2006 6:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Alberta Seperatism is on decline because of the conservative government.. But if there is a revival, we could see a big shift in that influence.
cbasu





Joined: 03 Sep 2006
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2006 6:34 pm    Post subject: Green Plan rollout Reply with quote

The Green Plan rollout planned for the week of Oct 9 should refute the implications in Hebert's column.

Of course, the Environmental Groups will never be happy no matter what the Conservatives do.
biggie





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PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2006 6:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

when they stop flying around in jets, emitting thousands of tons of GHGs, I'll take them seriously..
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Is the PMO tone deaf on Quebec?

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