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Albertan Technophile





Joined: 07 Sep 2006
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2006 10:22 pm    Post subject: A science brainteaser Reply with quote

Hey folks! I posted this on another forum and nobody can solve it. (No, I can't either)

Okay, you have a 10 gallon vessel capable of holding unlimited pressure. You pump in exactly 1lb(by mass) of oxygen.

Assuming the vessel was completely empty (as in vacuum) before you pump in the Oxygen, what psi would a guage show after the oxygen cools down to room temperature? (70F)

BTW, I do not know the answer. Please show how you got your answer.
cbasu





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PostPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2006 10:59 pm    Post subject: Consider my brain teased Reply with quote

I would have difficulty figuring out the PSI when the surface area of the vessel, or its depth, is not known (or knowable).

If the depth is known, for example, then the PSI would be equal to 1/((10*231)/depth inches), assuming US std. gal. measures for the vessel.
FF_Canuck





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PostPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2006 11:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

An answer isn't possible to this question. To have pressure, you must have resistance. If a container is capable of holding an infinite mass, this means that it has no resistance to what ever fills it, and thus cannot be pressurized.
kwlafayette





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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 2:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

72.678 atmospheres of pressure. I pulled that number out of one of my orifices.
Albertan Technophile





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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 10:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Okay, flawed question.

heh. :oops:
kwlafayette





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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 11:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think an answer is possible.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/V.....s_equation
Albertan Technophile





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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 2:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

SAVED!
kwlafayette





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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 4:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So what is the answer? I don't want to figure it out myself.
gebhartj





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PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2006 11:10 am    Post subject: Re: A science brainteaser Reply with quote

Albertan Technophile wrote:
Hey folks! I posted this on another forum and nobody can solve it. (No, I can't either)

Okay, you have a 10 gallon vessel capable of holding unlimited pressure. You pump in exactly 1lb(by mass) of oxygen.

Assuming the vessel was completely empty (as in vacuum) before you pump in the Oxygen, what psi would a guage show after the oxygen cools down to room temperature? (70F)

BTW, I do not know the answer. Please show how you got your answer.


Actually, you've got a couple of flaws...the first has has been mentioned, there's no way to convert volume to surface area without, at a minimum, knowing the shape of the container, and unless it's some shape that implies relative dimentions (ie a cube or sphere where all dimentions are equal) the dimentions thereof.

The second is the amount of oxygen. A pound is not a measure of mass, but one of force. That being said, 1lb of Oxygen is a different mass of oxygen when it is in an atmosphere versus in a vacuum. The Imperial unit of mass is the stone, the metric is the kilogram (metric force unit is the Newton).
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A science brainteaser

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