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RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Jan 10, 2019 2:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
The optics here are terrible. The NDP's problems are only getting worse. It's almost as if they are implementing Plan B before Plan A has been abandoned.





it doesn't seem that there that confident about his chances


something about Singh is just weird , I was looking thru his twitter page and he posted a baby picture from when he was born and then he posted this quote , but something about the whole post just seemed weird , who posts this kind of stuff to begin with



Jagmeet Singh‏Verified account @theJagmeetSingh · Jan 3


"My name will be Jagmeet Singh and it means friend to the world

I'm here to say hi and that I care about you

My secret is I think deep down we all care about each other and together we're going to build a better world"
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Thu Jan 10, 2019 3:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would argue the NDP at least discussing a plan B is a pretty smart political move;

While it didn't appear the NDP would be the favorite in the next Federal Election after its last leadership convention, I don't think anyone could have anticipated how much of a disaster Singh would have been as leader.

When you are sitting in a caucus meeting with 41 MPs, six of whom are not running again, and three empty chairs with MPs who have already left with a very real possibility that of the 35 that plan to run again 20 - 25 may not get re-elected, I would imagine some degree of political survival instinct kicks in.

Caron and Cullen aren't bad options if you have to do a quickly leadership vote.
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2019 9:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( not sure whats going on with the ndp rate now but in a troubled state )


War of words: Current, previous NDP leaders spar over state of the party


Rachel Aiello, Ottawa News Bureau Online Producer

@rachaiello
.
Published Saturday, January 12, 2019 7:00AM EST


OTTAWA – As he kicks off a high-stakes campaign to win a seat in Parliament while making the a case for why he should remain leader regardless of its outcome, NDP leader Jagmeet Singh says he's been able to turn the party around from the time Tom Mulcair was at the helm.

Asked about the fate of his party pending the outcome of the Feb. 25 Burnaby South byelection, Singh spoke of the state that the party was left in when he entered the picture.

"I'm really proud of our party given that we had two years where we had a leader that was effectively voted out, and things were really tough, we had horrible fundraising in that period of time, and we had not a lot of traction," Singh said.


"Despite that it shows how resilient our movement is… the fact that it still stayed so steady and now we've actually turned things around."

This comment wasn't received lightly by former NDP Leader Tom Mulcair, who took these remarks as a direct criticism of his tenure.

In a separate interview on CTV’s Question Period, Mulcair was asked to respond to his replacement offloading some of his party's political hardship on him.

"With regard to fundraising I mean, there are opinions but there are also facts. I'm proud to say that while I was leader of the NDP I raised more money than any other leader in the history of the party and that's a fact," Mulcair said.

Singh has been leader of the federal New Democrats since October 2017, and with nine months until the next election, the party is continuing to trail the Liberals and Conservatives when it comes to fundraising and support in the polls, both measures have remained low since the party fell from official opposition to third party in the 2015 election under Mulcair.

Despite this, Mulcair still thinks Singh may be able to pull off his all-important byelection win, but warned that it may come at the price of potentially holding on to his old seat, in Outremont, Que. because all of the NDP’s resources will be focused on Burnaby South.

This comes after Mulcair said earlier this week on CTV’s Power Play that it would "be extremely difficult" for Singh to stay on as leader if he loses the byelection in response to Singh vowing that he will "absolutely" be the leader that leads the New Democratic Party into the 2019 general election.

Mulcair questions if Singh is up to speed

This was not the only area in which the former leader questioned Singh, he also raised whether he's able to stay on top of the issues of the day.

In the interview airing on Sunday, Singh was asked to respond to China’s Ambassador to Canada alleging that “white supremacy” is at play in Canada’s demand that two citizens detained in China be released. His comments were made in an op-ed published in The Hill Times newspaper on Wednesday.

"Sorry, who accused who of white supremacy?" asked Singh, before saying "I don't know if there's any evidence of that suggestion." He then continued with general comments about how he was "deeply concerned" about the detentions of Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor.

Commenting on Singh apparently not being aware of the Chinese ambassador's comments, Mulcair called it "surprising," given the prominence of the ongoing diplomatic dispute between Canada and China, sparked by Canada's arrest of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou.

"It was very surprising that an issue that was on the front pages, not just in Canada, but in New York and in London, there are a lot of people who have paid close attention to what was being said here. It was a pretty shocking statement and I was a little bit surprised to find out that it was news for Mr. Singh," Mulcair said.


https://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/war-of-words-current-previous-ndp-leaders-spar-over-state-of-the-party-1.4250560
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2019 9:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( its interesting that some ndp mp's are waiting till after Singh's by election to announce there plans and a couple more from Quebec may also be thinking of not running ( ndp mp fro Hochelaga and Trois Rivieres )


NDP confirms 21 candidates

Of the NDP’s 21 nominated candidates, 15 are returning MPs, meaning fewer than half the party’s 40 MPs have been confirmed. With the NDP and its leader Jagmeet Singh struggling to gain traction in the polls or fundraise large amounts of money, several MPs have said they won’t be running in 2019 and some are still undecided.

Five-time NDP MP Nathan Cullen (Skeena-Bulkley Valley, B.C.) and Quebec MP and party whip Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet are among that group.


Mr. Cullen confirmed Jan. 15 that he hasn’t made a choice either way and is still discussing the matter with family and friends. Mr. Cullen said he’ll likely make up his mind after the February byelections, with Mr. Singh vying for one of the three federal seats.

The Burnaby South, B.C., contest is widely considered a must-win for the beleaguered leader, though Mr. Singh has said he’ll still lead the NDP into 2019 if he loses the seat.


Quebec MP Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet said she’s undecided whether she’ll run in 2019. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade

Ms. Boutin-Sweet’s office said by email she is “still thinking” and will announce her decision at the beginning of March. In 2015, Ms. Boutin-Sweet won Hochelaga, Que., by just 500 votes over the Liberal candidate.

French media have reported that Robert Aubin is considering a run for mayor of Trois-Rivières after serving his riding of the same name for two terms. In 2015, he beat the Liberal candidate by 1.6 per cent, or 969 votes.

NDP spokesman Guillaume Francoeur said by email the party has 15 more nomination meetings scheduled over the next few weeks.

“The nomination process is following its course as planned with many interesting candidates having expressed their intention to run for the NDP. We are confident that we will put together a remarkable slate of candidates everywhere across the country,” said Mr. Francoeur.

Of the 44 NDP MPs who arrived in 2015, 10 have either left office, said they won’t run for re-election, or in Erin Weir’s (Regina-Lewvan, Sask.) case, been booted from caucus. Six current MPs have said they will join the ranks of Sheila Malcolmson, Thomas Mulcair, and Kennedy Stewart, as former MPs. They include veteran MPs Hélène Laverdière (Laurier-Sainte Marie, Que.) and David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, Ont.), the NDP’s only Alberta seat in Linda Duncan (Edmonton Strathcona), as well as Romeo Saganash (Abitibi-Baie James-Nunavik-Eeyou, Que.), Fin Donnelly (Port Moody-Coquitlam, B.C.), and Irene Mathyssen, whose daughter is running in her stead for London-Fanshawe, Ont.

https://www.hilltimes.com/2019/01/16/conservatives-lead-2019-nominees-dozen-former-mps-among-hopefuls/183721
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2019 11:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Singh with all the issues surrounding the NDP should win Burnaby;
Its an existing NDP riding and they have spend time, money, and energy to secure it, even as Mulcair pointed out at expense of retaining another NDP riding.

However, on the unlikely chance that Singh loses then you may have a very different NDP in a few months than you do now.

I am not surprised that many are waiting for some clarity.
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2019 11:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
Singh with all the issues surrounding the NDP should win Burnaby;
Its an existing NDP riding and they have spend time, money, and energy to secure it, even as Mulcair pointed out at expense of retaining another NDP riding.

However, on the unlikely chance that Singh loses then you may have a very different NDP in a few months than you do now.

I am not surprised that many are waiting for some clarity.




under normal conditions the ndp wouldn't have any trouble winning a by election in an existing seat in BC especially when a party leader was the candidate


however this by election does not seem to be normal conditions for 2 main reasons

1- Singh is not from the riding or BC , also not asking for a temporary stay like Joe Clark did in 2000 ( and to then find a riding in Ontario ) but to stay on long term as its MP


2- the riding has a very large Chinese / Asian population and some wonder if perhaps Singh is a bad fit for the riding and perhaps they'd rather be represented by someone from there own community



anyways it makes sense that some ndp mp's are waiting to see what happens before announcing there long term plans but seems highly likely well see at least a couple more ndp mp's not run / retire
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2019 11:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well ... it's an existing NDP seat ... but it isn't a seat like Toronto Centre or Papineau.

I don't think it's a pro forma election. If I were Trudeau, I would be trying to keep Singh in place as the leader of the third party, and help the whole mess sink into oblivion. Bernier ought to be out there, equally a star candidate. He should be doing his best to embarrass the other three ... because it will get him some national coverage.

In any case, it won't matter much. The summer recess and bingo ... we're into another campaign.
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2019 1:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
Well ... it's an existing NDP seat ... but it isn't a seat like Toronto Centre or Papineau.

I don't think it's a pro forma election. If I were Trudeau, I would be trying to keep Singh in place as the leader of the third party, and help the whole mess sink into oblivion. Bernier ought to be out there, equally a star candidate. He should be doing his best to embarrass the other three ... because it will get him some national coverage.

In any case, it won't matter much. The summer recess and bingo ... we're into another campaign.



the outcome of the by election is now in total doubt once again with the sudden resignation of liberal candidate Karen Wang


were now back to asking if there will even be a liberal candidate in the by election and if so who could fill her spot on such short notice ?

and did the liberals already have signs and literature made up ? which now has to all be thrown out and likely used up a lot of there spending limit


if there is no liberal candidate ? will the Chinese vote or anti Singh vote move to the Conservative candidate

or will we see an even bigger surge by the People's Party in the riding ?
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 17, 2019 1:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

John Ivison: A most convenient misstep for the Liberals in Burnaby South
Jagmeet Singh remains Justin Trudeau’s preferred opponent in October’s federal election. Was the plan all along to throw this byelection fight?
John Ivison
January 16, 2019
7:50 PM EST

Occam’s razor, the problem-solving principle dating back to the 13th century friar William of Ockham, states that, other things being equal, simple explanations are generally better than more complex ones. [....]

Take events in the riding of Burnaby South in British Columbia. The Liberals hemmed and hawed about running a candidate in the Feb. 25 byelection there, conscious that if they did so, they might inadvertently win and put paid to the political career of Jagmeet Singh, the federal NDP leader who is seeking a seat in Parliament.

Singh has found the learning curve in federal politics particularly steep, making numerous missteps in the full glare of the national media.

This past weekend, he failed to answer a question on a topic that had been all over the news. He claimed he hadn’t heard the question, but he left the impression that it is only the hard questions that he mis-hears.

Singh remains Justin Trudeau’s preferred opponent in October’s federal election and there was the very real prospect that, if defeated, he might be replaced by someone more seasoned. (Emphasis added.)

The Liberals had the option of not running a candidate in Burnaby South — Elizabeth May’s Green Party decided to respect the old tradition of “leader’s courtesy,” not running against a federal leader trying to win a seat in the House of Commons.

Yet there were local pressures to run a Liberal candidate in the byelection, and it was decided it would be bad form for the ruling party to be so brazen about its preferences.

Step forward Karen Wang, a local daycare operator, who edged biotech scientist Cyrus Eduljee in a contested nomination.

Wang’s candidacy put Singh’s political future very much in doubt, given the seat was won by NDP MP Kennedy Stewart by just 600 votes over his Liberal rival in 2015.

It went unsaid by everyone that a Chinese-Canadian candidate might have extra cachet in a riding where nearly 40 per cent of voters are of Chinese descent.

Step forward Karen Wang, a local daycare operator, who edged biotech scientist Cyrus Eduljee in a contested nomination

At least, it went unsaid until Wang said it. Not only did she point out on a Chinese social media platform that she was “the only Chinese candidate,” she identified Singh as being “of Indian descent.”

It was a pretty blatant case of racism from the party that claimed so often in the last election that “a Canadian is a Canadian is a Canadian.”

Since Trudeau’s main line of attack in the next election will be to accuse the Conservatives of fomenting the “politics of division,” it was clear that he would not support a candidate emphasizing differences and playing on intolerance to get elected.

Wang said the “phrasing should have been different” and removed her Chinese language post but it was too late.

Early Wednesday Pacific time, the party issued a statement saying that Wang’s comments “are not aligned with the values of the Liberal Party of Canada” and said it had accepted her resignation. “The Liberal party has a clear commitment to positive politics and support for Canadian diversity and the same is always expected of our candidates,” it said.

Wang issued her own statement, apologizing to Singh, and saying her choice of words about his cultural background “was not well-considered and did not reflect my intent.”

Her resignation has left Singh alone on the left of the political spectrum in Burnaby South, facing Conservative Jay Shin and People’s Party candidate Laura Lynn Tyler Thompson. His victory would seem assured, if the Liberals don’t replace Wang. And yet they seem in no hurry to do so. When asked if there would be another Liberal candidate, Liberal communications director Braeden Caley said: “We’ll have more to discuss on that in due course.”

The most recent opinion poll in Burnaby South by Mainstreet Research suggested the byelection was turning into a two-horse race between Singh, with 39 per cent support, and Wang, with 26 per cent. The Conservatives will be more alarmed by the pollsters’ estimate of People’s Party support, at nine per cent, than the failure of their candidate to win the seat (Shin had the support of 22 per cent of the 740 people polled.)

Even with a margin of error of nearly four per cent, it’s clear that Burnaby South will stay orange if there is no Liberal in the race.

So back to Occam’s razor. Was this just a case of a reckless candidate gambling that if she played dog-whistle politics, it wouldn’t be heard beyond the Chinese community?

Or was the plan all along to throw the fight?

Nine times out of 10, it would be the former but the outcome of this electoral rumpus is extremely convenient for Trudeau. He has polished his own halo as the great unifier who will forge consensus and bridge divides.

And he has all but insured that an NDP leader yet to find his feet on the national stage staggers on to fight the general election.

This may be the rare occasion when the hoofbeats are made by zebras.
https://nationalpost.com/opinion/john-ivison-a-most-convenient-misstep-for-the-liberals-in-burnaby-south
=================================================

Is this 'racism'? It certainly illustrates how, as the left takes us deeper and deeper into racial and sexual bigotry, race (and gender) are used, politically. What I mean is that this current regime -- focussed as it is on "human rights" rather than relics of obsolete thinking as enshrined in our Charter of Rights and Freedoms -- normally sees nothing wrong with the moblilization of their ethnic group in advancing themselves through the actions of the state.

What is wrong with a political candidate eliciting support amongst her countrymen in Canada, under the rules that are currently imposed upon us? She appeals to her own people and points out that Singh is of Indian heritage. All of that is probably true.

Once again, apparently, the truth is racist.

When homosexual candidates run, do they not appeal to the homosexuals for support on the basis of their communal interest in pressing their community's goals? Is that wrong?

Ditto for feminists, who display the full range of their creative 'mean girl' hate when confronted with an articulate female who is not a feminist? Is that wrong, all of a sudden?

This is the way charges of racism work in this world. It isn't just white males anymore. Wang is presumed guilty because she called on "her people" to support her and it would likely have overcome that 600 vote margin that (presumably) made Burnaby a safe seat.

The suggestion is that Trudeau's gang of ugly politicians will use race this way in the upcoming election ... to presume the racial guilt of the mainstream of Canadians can be manipulated so that Trudeau's gang of fools will retain power.

Watch for Andrew to respond ... by saying "Me too" to the Liberal line.
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 17, 2019 2:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Liberals reject candidate's hope for 'second chance' in byelection against Singh


The Canadian Press
January 17, 2019 09:34 AM


VANCOUVER — The Liberal party has swiftly rejected a bid by a former byelection candidate who hoped for a "second chance" to run for the party after making online comments about the ethnicity of NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh.

Karen Wang dropped out Wednesday as the Liberal candidate in Burnaby South after posting on Chinese social media platform WeChat that she was the "only" Chinese candidate while she described Singh as "of Indian descent."


She said Thursday that she "still loves" the Liberals and believes her philosophies fit the party's policies. But the party quickly put out a statement saying that their decision to accept her resignation still stands.

"As mentioned yesterday, recent online comments by Karen Wang are not aligned with the values of the Liberal Party of Canada. The Liberal party has accepted her resignation as a candidate and she will not represent the Liberal party in the Burnaby South byelection," it said.


Elections Canada has also confirmed her withdrawal as the Liberal candidate, following a written letter submitted to the organization, the statement said.

When Wang announced her decision Wednesday, she apologized to Singh and said her choice of words weren't well-considered and didn't reflect her intent.

StarMetro Vancouver reported Wang's now-deleted post on WeChat. The post has been translated to read: "If we can increase the voting rate, as the only Chinese candidate in this riding, if I can garner 16,000 votes I will easily win the byelection, control the election race and make history! My opponent in this byelection is the NDP candidate Singh of Indian descent!"

Speaking in a phone interview Thursday, Wang disputed that her comment was "racist" and said she'd have more to say at a news conference that afternoon.

"Recently they labelled me as a racist, which is totally wrong. I am not. So I would like to explain that to the public as well," she said.

"I need to explain it to the public and the people in the community know me and my heart is there, and I have the passion to serve them."

She added that if the Liberals won't take her back, she would consider running as an Independent.

"It would depend how much support I get from my supporters and I would discuss with my support team. Yes, I would consider that as well."

Singh accepted her apology on Wednesday while expressing his concerns about "divisive politics" in Canada.

"We see that in the south — divisive politics and how it tears apart a country. I want to focus in on politics that bring people together," he said.

Conservative party spokesman Cory Hann said Wang's resignation as the Liberal candidate leaves the byelection in a clear two-person race between NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh and Conservative candidate Jay Shin.

Hann did not directly address the controversy around Wang's WeChat post, but did take aim at Singh, saying he is "using the residents of Burnaby South to save his political life."

"Voters in Burnaby South deserve an MP who will stand up for them, not one who's using them as a political bus stop."

— With files from Beth Leighton in Vancouver and Mia Rabson in Ottawa


https://www.richmond-news.com/liberals-reject-candidate-s-hope-for-second-chance-in-byelection-against-singh-1.23603365
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 19, 2019 10:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( Singh's quest to get into the house just got more challenging with news the liberals are in fact running a candidate against him . a former BC liberal mla from Burnaby

it seems the liberals are in fact out to try and steal this seat from the ndp , so much for leaders courtesy )





Liberal Party‏Verified account @liberal_party · 1m1 minute ago


We’re pleased to welcome accomplished community leader @Richard_T_Lee to #TeamTrudeau as the Liberal candidate in Burnaby South.
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 2019 9:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ottawa should be ready to ditch Trans Mountain if consultations fail to get Indigenous 'buy-in,' says Singh
'That is not meaningful consultation if you've already decided the outcome'
Rosemary Barton · CBC News · Posted: Jan 20, 2019 4:00 AM ET | Last Updated: 4 hours ago

Jagmeet Singh says the federal government should be willing to terminate the expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline if consultations do not end in "partnership" and "buy-in" from all the communities along the route.

"They can't say that they want to build something and say it's going to be built, and then on the other side say, 'We're going to meaningfully consult with communities.' That is not meaningful consultation if you've already decided the outcome," the NDP leader said in a wide-ranging interview to air on CBC's The National this Sunday night.

Singh declared last spring that he was opposed to the Trans Mountain expansion project. Alberta Premier Rachel Notley, a New Democrat who has been lobbying hard for Trans Mountain, called Singh's position on the pipeline "naive."

Singh, who doesn't currently hold a seat in the House of Commons, is now running in the federal byelection in Burnaby South, a community where many have deep concerns about the pipeline and its expansion. Voters go to the polls Feb. 25.

'Open to no'
Singh said Ottawa should be "open to no" after its second round of consultations with First Nations.

Last August, the Federal Court of Appeal quashed licensing for the $7.4 billion expansion project, telling the Trudeau government it would have to do further "meaningful" consultation with First Nations and that concerns about increased tanker traffic had not been adequately addressed.

The government accepted those findings and named former Supreme Court justice Frank Iacobucci to lead Phase 3 of its Indigenous consultations. No deadline has been set for those consultations to end.

Singh said that if those consultations suggest that not all communities on the pipeline route are on board, the federal government must accept that.

"I mean the communities that are impacted, the lands, the sovereign nations that are impacted, may not accept that this is a project that they want to support," he said. "And that is something that the government has to be prepared to accept."

A Supreme Court decision from 2017 (involving the Ktunaxa Nation and the development of a ski hill) made it clear, however, that section 35 of the Constitution — which deals with Indigenous rights — does not give Indigenous communities the right to veto a project.

"Where adequate consultation has occurred," that ruling said, "a development may proceed without consent."

Singh acknowledged the legal limits but suggested that reconciliation with First Nations means the government ought to go further.

"Well, we've got to be committed to doing more than just checking off a box," he said. "That's not enough. That's not actually going to be reconciliation. If you just go say, 'Well look, I've done this and I've done this I've checked off a box ... that's not meaningful reconciliation."

The government made the decision to purchase Trans Mountain for $4.5 billion after project proponent Kinder Morgan deemed it too financially risky to pursue due to the drawn-out court challenges. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has said he is committed to the project and believes it is the "national interest."

Singh said the project should be driven by the private sector and no public money should be used for resource development.

As for the tens of thousands of Canadians who rely on the oil sector for work — or who have been laid off from oilpatch jobs in recent years — Singh said it's not their "fault" the energy sector is unpredictable and the government should be investing in "sustainable" jobs for the future.

On the issue of climate change, Singh said that if he were to be elected prime minister he would set much tougher national emissions targets — despite the fact that no developed country, Canada included, is on track to meet the emissions targets set in the Paris climate accord.

Singh also said he supports a carbon tax but wants a "progressive" one that costs more for those who emit more while costing families less. He would not go into details on how that would work, saying the NDP's carbon tax plan will be released eventually.
https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/trans-mountain-singh-pipeline-trudeau-1.4983757
==================================================

You could call this "the minimal solution". I think, in many ways, he's got a point, but it's the wrong point. Put it this way -- he has a point, but his solution does give our aboriginal brothers a veto, and that is not acceptable. We are in this situation because of judge-made law. Ugh!
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 2019 10:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Federal Liberals announce former B.C. MLA as new candidate in byelection

Richard Lee will face off against federal NDP leader Jagmeet Singh
Ashley Wadhwani/
Jan. 19, 2019 8:10 a.m./
News


A former B.C. MLA will be facing off against federal NDP leader Jagmeet Singh in the Burnaby byelection, replacing former candidate Liberal Karen Wang.

The Liberals announced its new candidate Saturday.

Richard Lee served 16 years as an MLA in the Burnaby North riding until 2017, when he lost re-election to NDP MLA Janet Routledge. During his time in office he became the first Chinese-Canadian to serve as Deputy Speaker of the Legislature.


In a statement on Twitter he said he is proud to call Burnaby his home.


“I’m looking forward to working with Justin Trudeau to keep making progress on Burnaby’s priorities, like investing in new affordable housing and better transit, creating good middle-class jobs, and protecting a healthy environment for our kids and grandkids,” he said.


Wang announced she’d be dropping out as the candidate Wednesday, after a controversial comment was found by the Toronto Star on WeChat, a Chinese-language forum, pointing to her Chinese origin and Singh’s Indian background.

A day after resigning as candidate, Wang wrote to the Liberal party requesting she be brought back into the race, but it was rejected. According to Wang, the comment was written by a volunteer in her campaign.

More to come.


https://www.surreynowleader.com/news/federal-liberals-announce-former-b-c-mla-as-new-candidate-in-byelection/
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 2019 1:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This guy looks like a better candidate than the previous one. Too bad he's male, but otherwise, he looks like he has a profile and political experience. Chinese Canadian voters can probably overlook his masculinity because the other choice is Singh, who also presents as cis-gendered.
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 21, 2019 8:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( whats interesting is there seems to be some higher profile candidates emerging for the ndp despite the poor polling numbers , in Winnipeg a current mla wants to run in Winnipeg Centre )


Manitoba's former justice minister seeks NDP nod to run in federal election


Steve Lambert / The Canadian Press
January 20, 2019 03:08 PM



CPT106525894.jpg

Andrew Swan is seen in this undated handout photo. A former Manitoba justice minister is aiming to leave the provincial legislature for a seat in the House of Commons. Andrew Swan, who has been sitting on the opposition benches since the Manitoba New Democrats lost the last election, is seeking the federal NDP nomination in Winnipeg-Centre, a riding currently held by Liberal Robert-Falcon Ouellette. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO, Andrew Swan Campaign *MANDATORY CREDIT*




WINNIPEG — A former Manitoba justice minister is aiming to leave the provincial legislature for a seat in the House of Commons.

Andrew Swan, who has been sitting on the opposition benches since the Manitoba New Democrats lost the last election, is seeking the federal NDP nomination in Winnipeg-Centre, a riding currently held by Liberal Robert-Falcon Ouellette.


"Successive Conservative and Liberal governments have really turned their back on the heart of Winnipeg," Swan told The Canadian Press on Sunday.

Swan cited issues such as poverty and the rising use of methamphetamines as issues that need to be addressed. The time is also right, personally, for him to be able to make the jump to Ottawa.


"My girls are 20 and 18, they're both at university, so they don't need me around quite as much as they would have four years ago."

Winnipeg Centre has a long history of voting NDP. But former New Democrat MP Pat Martin was voted out in 2015 in favour of Ouellette.

Swan said he will retain his seat in the legislature for the time being. If he wins the nomination for the October federal election, he will then decide when to resign.

Swan will face at least one competitor for the NDP nomination. Leah Gazan, a lecturer at the University of Winnipeg and public speaker, has already announced her intention to seek the nomination. A date for the nomination vote has not been set.

If Swan leaves the legislature, he will follow a few other New Democrats who have either recently departed or announced their intention not to run again in the provincial election slated for next year. Kevin Chief, the only New Democrat to get a higher vote percentage than Swan in the last election, stepped down two years ago. Former premier Greg Selinger quit last year. Rob Altemeyer and James Allum have announced they will not run after serving out their current terms.

The departures are not good news for the provincial New Democrats, according to one political analyst.

"It's part of a generational turnover, I guess ... but that's the optimistic interpretation," said Paul Thomas, professor emeritus of political studies at the University of Manitoba.

"I think it has more to do with people's calculations about what the prospects are for the provincial party when the next election occurs."

Swan was first elected in 2004 and later served as minister of Competitiveness, Training and Trade, then as Justice Minister.

He was one of five senior ministers who openly challenged Selinger's leadership in 2014. Selinger survived the leadership crisis, and led the NDP into the 2016 election that saw them swept from power after 17 years.

The NDP currently holds 12 of the 57 legislature seats.

https://www.burnabynow.com/manitoba-s-former-justice-minister-seeks-ndp-nod-to-run-in-federal-election-1.23606337
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Does Jagmeet Singh need a seat in the house ?

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