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RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2018 5:52 pm    Post subject: Trudeau accused of misconduct against reporter in 2000 Reply with quote

( this story appears to be based on a newspaper editiorial from 2000 , the event appears to have took place in the interior of BC . but I love the quote when trudeau got caught m if he knew she worked for a major newspaper chain he never would of done it , but questions who and where is this female reporter now ? why has the national post chain never revealed to the public this incident happened ? )


Justin Trudeau Accused of Groping Reporter in 2000



by JOSHUA CAPLAN

7 Jun 2018

In a recently resurfaced editorial, Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau appears to apologize for “inappropriately handling” a young journalist nearly 18 years ago.
According to the Creston Valley Advance, Trudeau told the young woman: “I’m sorry. If I had known you were reporting for a national paper, I would never have been so forward.”




The editorial, largely dismissive of the apology, chides Trudeau over what the author perceives as a lack of self-awareness as the son of former prime minister Pierre Elliott Trudeau.

“[S]houldn’t the son of a former prime minister be aware of the rights and wrongs that go along with public socializing?” the editorial asks.

“Didn’t he learn through his vast experiences in public life, that groping a strange young woman isn’t in the handbook of proper etiquette, regardless of who she is, what her business is or where they are?”

Trudeau, a champion of the #MeToo movement, penned an essay in 2017 urging parents to raise their boys as feminists.

“[O]ur sons have the power and the responsibility to change our culture of sexism,” Trudeau wrote, adding, “Our sons have the power and the responsibility to change our culture of sexism.”

The 43-year-old leader unveiled a federal “gender equity” budget in February to reduce the pay gap between men and women.

Amid tense negotiations with the U.S. on NAFTA and tariffs, Trudeau plans to make gender equality a “top priority” at the G7 leaders’ summit in Quebec this week



http://www.breitbart.com/big-g.....rter-2000/


you can view the tweets here , shows a clear view of the newspaper article where it clearly states trudeau apologised over the incident


https://twitter.com/CandiceMalcolm


https://twitter.com/sdbcraig
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2018 6:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the editorial from BC would seem to indicate that some of his comments to the cbc might not of been truthful )


Trudeau says zero tolerance on misconduct toward women applies to him as well



In CBC Radio interview, PM says recent high-profile cases aren't about compliments taken the wrong way


Catharine Tunney · CBC News · Posted: Jan 30, 2018 5:57 PM ET | Last Updated: January 31



Prime Minister Justin Trudeau sat down with Chris Hall, host of CBC Radio's The House in the Library of Parliament. (Marc Robichaud/CBC)



Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says women who come forward with complaints of sexual assault and harassment must be supported and believed.

And he's confident no one will be able to accuse him of the kinds of behaviour that have brought down several high-profile politicians this week.

"I've been very, very careful all my life to be thoughtful, to be respectful of people's space and people's headspace as well," he told CBC Radio's The House, in an interview airing Saturday.

When asked if any of his past actions could be misconstrued, Trudeau said he didn't think so.


"This is something that I'm not new to. I've been working on issues around sexual assault for over 25 years.

"My first activism and engagement was at the sexual assault centre at McGill students' society where I was one of the first male facilitators in their outreach program leading conversations — sometimes very difficult ones — on the issues of consent, communications, accountability, power dynamics."


The international #MeToo movement that has hit Hollywood producers, Capitol Hill and boardrooms has wafted into Canadian politics.

Last week, Trudeau accepted Kent Hehr's resignation from cabinet pending an investigation into allegations of sexual harassment.

Kristin Raworth alleged on social media that Hehr made the inappropriate comments — which included calling her "yummy" — when he was an Alberta MLA a decade ago and she was an employee at the legislature.

Hehr remains in caucus.

Hehr's resignation came hours after Patrick Brown stepped down as leader of the Ontario Progressive Conservative Party following allegations of sexual misconduct.

In Tuesday's interview with CBC's Chris Hall, Trudeau said his government is trying to balance listening to victims and giving the accused due process, but he made a point of saying the recent allegations are cases where women felt unsafe in their work environment.

'No frivolous approaches'

"These are not just compliments that were taken wrong, or comments that could have meant nothing. There are situations in the cases that we're discussing these days that fundamentally made women unsafe in the work environment, unsure about themselves and truly affected their lives," he said.

"There are no frivolous approaches that have been highlighted so far."

An independent investigation into Hehr's behaviour will be conducted.

Trudeau said if allegations surfaced against him the same standards would apply.


Brown allegedly made sexual advances toward a 19-year-old staffer who was drunk during his time as a federal MP, according to one of two women whose accusations of sexual misconduct led to his resignation as leader of Ontario's Progressive Conservative party early Thursday.

He categorically denies those allegations.

The day before, Nova Scotia PC leader Jamie Baillie was forced out as party leader and later resigned his seat in the legislature after allegations of workplace sexual harassment.

Asked if he thought that MPs should have to sign a code of conduct when they take their place in the House of Commons, Trudeau said Canada's Olympic Athletes must sign a code of conduct before going off to represent Canada and that the idea was interesting.

"I think it's a very interesting idea that people who represent their communities and represent Canada in this place should really be accountable to a code of conduct," Trudeau said.



http://www.cbc.ca/news/politic.....-1.4511093
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2018 6:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

BONOKOSKI: Shocker! Resurfaced editorial slams Justin Trudeau as a groper



Mark Bonokoski




Published:
June 7, 2018


Updated:
June 7, 2018 6:38 PM EDT


Filed Under:

Toronto SUN ›
News ›
Canada ›


Prime Minister Justin Trudeau rises during Question Period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Wednesday, June 6, 2018.PATRICK DOYLE / THE CANADIAN PRESS



Our feminist preacher of a prime minister, Justin Trudeau, had best bone up on the scriptures before he lectures again on how to treat women.

John 8:7 might be a good place to start, especially the bit about letting he who is without sin cast the first stone.

That’s always been a good one.

There are a bunch of others, of course, that don’t need paraphrased quotations from the Bible to deliver the same sort of message. Those who live in glass houses should not throw stones, for example.

That one’s a homey, too.

And then there is this one: everything old is new again, an expression that certainly applies to the story now taking on a new life on social media about claims of Trudeau’s “groping” of a young female reporter 18 years ago while visiting the Kootenay-area town of Creston Valley, B.C., (Pop: 5,300).

The editor of Creston Valley Advance certainly wasn’t impressed with Trudeau’s alleged sexual manhandling of his reporter, and even wrote an editorial about the incident—headlined, “Open eyes”— which is now heating up Twitter.

When I called the Advance, the woman who answered the phone remembers the incident, but not the name of the reporter. She also knew that Lorne Eckersley, now the paper’s publisher, was the editor and the time, but there was no way in the world that she was going to give me his cellphone number to get his recollections.

“He’s on vacation,” she said. “Call back Monday. But I am not going to interrupt him.”

We could all use such guardians at the gate.

The newspaper led off its editorial with what it called Trudeau’s one-day-late “apology” to the unnamed reporter, which wasn’t an apology at all but more like some high-society toff looking down his nose at someone who was obviously a lesser being.

For this is what Trudeau reportedly said to the offended young woman: “I’m sorry. If I had known you were reporting for a national newspaper, I would never have been so forward.”

Say what? That it’s somehow okay to be inappropriate with a young reporter from a small-town weekly, but not to a reporter who might be also be making a few extra bucks by stringing her story to a national newspaper?

What would the hashtag be for that? #MeTooButNotYou?

Or #MeTooDepending?


This all allegedly happened when Trudeau was visiting the B.C. resort town and attending a local festival in August, 2000. But he was no kid at the time.

He was 29.

As the editorial rightly asked all those 18 years ago, “shouldn’t the son of a former prime minister be aware of the rights and wrongs that go along with public socializing?

“Didn’t he learn through his vast experiences in public life, that groping a strange young woman isn’t in the handbook of proper etiquette regardless of who she is, what her business is, or where they are?”

Our prime minister has yet to respond to this piece of his past coming back to haunt him, but he must — even if it detracts from some of the sound bites he would rather have come out of this weekend’s G7 summit in Quebec.

The Sun reached out to the Prime Minister’s Office but has not yet received a response.

But if there are those who look at the year 2000 and think Justin Trudeau was perhaps reeling from his famous father’s death as some sort of explanation, that would be a wrong conclusion.

Pierre Trudeau was still alive when his eldest son made that little trip to Creston Valley, B.C., although he did die a month later.

So what, then, was Trudeau the Younger’s excuse if the reporter’s accusations are true?

Chauvinist piggery awaiting exorcism?

Surely there has to be a reason.


http://torontosun.com/news/nat.....s-a-groper
HowieDoin





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PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2018 7:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:
BONOKOSKI: Shocker! Resurfaced editorial slams Justin Trudeau as a groper



Mark Bonokoski




Published:
June 7, 2018


Updated:
June 7, 2018 6:38 PM EDT


Filed Under:

Toronto SUN ›
News ›
Canada ›


Prime Minister Justin Trudeau rises during Question Period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Wednesday, June 6, 2018.PATRICK DOYLE / THE CANADIAN PRESS



Our feminist preacher of a prime minister, Justin Trudeau, had best bone up on the scriptures before he lectures again on how to treat women.

John 8:7 might be a good place to start, especially the bit about letting he who is without sin cast the first stone.

That’s always been a good one.

There are a bunch of others, of course, that don’t need paraphrased quotations from the Bible to deliver the same sort of message. Those who live in glass houses should not throw stones, for example.

That one’s a homey, too.

And then there is this one: everything old is new again, an expression that certainly applies to the story now taking on a new life on social media about claims of Trudeau’s “groping” of a young female reporter 18 years ago while visiting the Kootenay-area town of Creston Valley, B.C., (Pop: 5,300).

The editor of Creston Valley Advance certainly wasn’t impressed with Trudeau’s alleged sexual manhandling of his reporter, and even wrote an editorial about the incident—headlined, “Open eyes”— which is now heating up Twitter.

When I called the Advance, the woman who answered the phone remembers the incident, but not the name of the reporter. She also knew that Lorne Eckersley, now the paper’s publisher, was the editor and the time, but there was no way in the world that she was going to give me his cellphone number to get his recollections.

“He’s on vacation,” she said. “Call back Monday. But I am not going to interrupt him.”

We could all use such guardians at the gate.

The newspaper led off its editorial with what it called Trudeau’s one-day-late “apology” to the unnamed reporter, which wasn’t an apology at all but more like some high-society toff looking down his nose at someone who was obviously a lesser being.

For this is what Trudeau reportedly said to the offended young woman: “I’m sorry. If I had known you were reporting for a national newspaper, I would never have been so forward.”

Say what? That it’s somehow okay to be inappropriate with a young reporter from a small-town weekly, but not to a reporter who might be also be making a few extra bucks by stringing her story to a national newspaper?

What would the hashtag be for that? #MeTooButNotYou?

Or #MeTooDepending?


This all allegedly happened when Trudeau was visiting the B.C. resort town and attending a local festival in August, 2000. But he was no kid at the time.

He was 29.

As the editorial rightly asked all those 18 years ago, “shouldn’t the son of a former prime minister be aware of the rights and wrongs that go along with public socializing?

“Didn’t he learn through his vast experiences in public life, that groping a strange young woman isn’t in the handbook of proper etiquette regardless of who she is, what her business is, or where they are?”

Our prime minister has yet to respond to this piece of his past coming back to haunt him, but he must — even if it detracts from some of the sound bites he would rather have come out of this weekend’s G7 summit in Quebec.

The Sun reached out to the Prime Minister’s Office but has not yet received a response.

But if there are those who look at the year 2000 and think Justin Trudeau was perhaps reeling from his famous father’s death as some sort of explanation, that would be a wrong conclusion.

Pierre Trudeau was still alive when his eldest son made that little trip to Creston Valley, B.C., although he did die a month later.

So what, then, was Trudeau the Younger’s excuse if the reporter’s accusations are true?

Chauvinist piggery awaiting exorcism?

Surely there has to be a reason.


http://torontosun.com/news/nat.....s-a-groper



Glad you grabbed this when you did, because the piece has since been taken down.
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2018 7:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

HowieDoin wrote:
RCO wrote:
BONOKOSKI: Shocker! Resurfaced editorial slams Justin Trudeau as a groper



Mark Bonokoski




Published:
June 7, 2018


Updated:
June 7, 2018 6:38 PM EDT


Filed Under:

Toronto SUN ›
News ›
Canada ›


Prime Minister Justin Trudeau rises during Question Period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Wednesday, June 6, 2018.PATRICK DOYLE / THE CANADIAN PRESS



Our feminist preacher of a prime minister, Justin Trudeau, had best bone up on the scriptures before he lectures again on how to treat women.

John 8:7 might be a good place to start, especially the bit about letting he who is without sin cast the first stone.

That’s always been a good one.

There are a bunch of others, of course, that don’t need paraphrased quotations from the Bible to deliver the same sort of message. Those who live in glass houses should not throw stones, for example.

That one’s a homey, too.

And then there is this one: everything old is new again, an expression that certainly applies to the story now taking on a new life on social media about claims of Trudeau’s “groping” of a young female reporter 18 years ago while visiting the Kootenay-area town of Creston Valley, B.C., (Pop: 5,300).

The editor of Creston Valley Advance certainly wasn’t impressed with Trudeau’s alleged sexual manhandling of his reporter, and even wrote an editorial about the incident—headlined, “Open eyes”— which is now heating up Twitter.

When I called the Advance, the woman who answered the phone remembers the incident, but not the name of the reporter. She also knew that Lorne Eckersley, now the paper’s publisher, was the editor and the time, but there was no way in the world that she was going to give me his cellphone number to get his recollections.

“He’s on vacation,” she said. “Call back Monday. But I am not going to interrupt him.”

We could all use such guardians at the gate.

The newspaper led off its editorial with what it called Trudeau’s one-day-late “apology” to the unnamed reporter, which wasn’t an apology at all but more like some high-society toff looking down his nose at someone who was obviously a lesser being.

For this is what Trudeau reportedly said to the offended young woman: “I’m sorry. If I had known you were reporting for a national newspaper, I would never have been so forward.”

Say what? That it’s somehow okay to be inappropriate with a young reporter from a small-town weekly, but not to a reporter who might be also be making a few extra bucks by stringing her story to a national newspaper?

What would the hashtag be for that? #MeTooButNotYou?

Or #MeTooDepending?


This all allegedly happened when Trudeau was visiting the B.C. resort town and attending a local festival in August, 2000. But he was no kid at the time.

He was 29.

As the editorial rightly asked all those 18 years ago, “shouldn’t the son of a former prime minister be aware of the rights and wrongs that go along with public socializing?

“Didn’t he learn through his vast experiences in public life, that groping a strange young woman isn’t in the handbook of proper etiquette regardless of who she is, what her business is, or where they are?”

Our prime minister has yet to respond to this piece of his past coming back to haunt him, but he must — even if it detracts from some of the sound bites he would rather have come out of this weekend’s G7 summit in Quebec.

The Sun reached out to the Prime Minister’s Office but has not yet received a response.

But if there are those who look at the year 2000 and think Justin Trudeau was perhaps reeling from his famous father’s death as some sort of explanation, that would be a wrong conclusion.

Pierre Trudeau was still alive when his eldest son made that little trip to Creston Valley, B.C., although he did die a month later.

So what, then, was Trudeau the Younger’s excuse if the reporter’s accusations are true?

Chauvinist piggery awaiting exorcism?

Surely there has to be a reason.


http://torontosun.com/news/nat.....s-a-groper



Glad you grabbed this when you did, because the piece has since been taken down.


weird it does appear to have been taken down , well we won't be silenced here , I'll keep looking into this story until we find out the truth


it seems this incident did happen and the newspaper report is solid proof that something unusual did occur in BC that summer and trudeau was involved
Bugs





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PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2018 9:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

And what if he did?

If Michael Bryant could zoom down the wrong side of Bloor Street to kill a cyclist that was bothering him, what makes you think any agency in Canada is going to find the little Prince guilty of anything?

And even if he did, so what?

He is driving the country down. He's screwing up our NAFTA negotiations, and Trump is openly treating him as a boring joke. Now he's going to settle things, once and for all, with Trump!
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2018 9:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Sun Article is back up;
Or at least I was able to access it when I clicked on it
HowieDoin





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PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2018 9:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
The Sun Article is back up;
Or at least I was able to access it when I clicked on it


Good stuff. I think all of us here knew he was a scumbag. What’s most notable to me is that nobody vetted this guy. Media especially.
RCO





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Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Thu Jun 14, 2018 12:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the Canadian media have chosen to take a pass on this story and refuse to talk about it period , strange that trudeau seems to think his denial is good enough even though there is an actual editorial which seems to indicate that something did happen here or why else would someone have written it ? )


Don’t believe Canada’s media on Me Too stories

June 14, 2018 Brian Lilley Canadian Politics 2
.

Justin Trudeau at the G7 in Charlevoix.

    .

Next time you read, watch or hear a story about how Parliament Hill is learning to deal with sexual harassment in the Me Too era, ignore it.

Canada’s national media have proven they have selective interest in this topic.


It is now 8 days since Warren Kinsella posted the editorial from the Creston Valley Advance about Justin Trudeau groping a young reporter in 2000. It’s been a full week since my Sun colleague Mark Bonokoski published his column on Trudeau laying out the allegations in a major daily newspaper.

Since then the story has been picked up by Buzzfeed, The Sun UK, The Daily Telegraph, Breitbart and Narcity. Even the New York Times made mention of it here.

Notice that other than the Sun, these are all online or out of country media outlets. There are no newspapers outside of the Sun, no Canadian TV networks have touched this. Next to no Canadian coverage at all.


I wrote about it in the Toronto Sun here. I know that it has been covered on talk radio by myself, Bill Carroll, Roy Green and I am sure some others but where is the rest of the coverage.

There is a story waiting to be told.

The woman at the centre of these 18 year old allegations does not want to talk. I can I understand her position but that doesn’t mean there is no story.

There is the original editorial, the one that quotes Trudeau.

“If I had known you were reporting for a national paper, I never would have been so forward,” the paper reported Trudeau saying.


There is the part of the editorial that chastises Trudeau for his actions.

“Didn’t he learn through his vast experiences in public life, that groping a strange young woman isn’t in the handbook of proper etiquette regardless of who she is, what her business is, or where they are.”

There is the comment that Bonokoski got from the PMO that I’m sure they would give to anyone that called or emailed them.

“He remembers being in Creston for the Avalanche Foundation, but he doesn’t think he had any negative interactions there,” Matt Pascuzzo said.

All of these are the basis for a story and at least should prompt questions to Trudeau about this issue.

Where are the questions?

Remember, these allegations were out there on the evening of Wednesday June 6. Trudeau spoke to the media on Thursday and Friday before the G7 but faced no questions. He didn’t get questioned on this at the G7 closing news conference.

When he got back to Ottawa, Trudeau also was able to speak to the media on Tuesday and Wednesday without being questioned.


Sure, we are in the middle of a trade war but it isn’t like Trudeau hasn’t been answering questions on other topics. It isn’t like the reporters on Parliament Hill are only dealing with one story.

This is a study in ignoring a major story that is sitting right in front of them. When Patrick Brown faced allegations every media outlet jumped on them. When Rick Dykstra faced allegations the same thing happened.

Liberal MPs such as Darshan Khan, Kent Hehr, Massimo Pacetti and Scott andrews were all covered extensively. An old complaint against New Democrat Christine Moore was covered extensively.

Allegations against Justin Trudeau?

The national media doesn’t want to see it, doesn’t want to cover it.

They won’t hold Trudeau to the same standard they hold others to even though he says it should apply.

“The standard applies to everyone,” Justin Trudeau told CBC in an interview in February. In that interview he also said it doesn’t matter how old the allegations are.

“There is no context in which someone doesn’t have responsibility for things they have done in the past,” Trudeau said.

Except in the context of Canada’s national media.


http://brianlilley.com/dont-be.....o-stories/
Bugs





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PostPosted: Thu Jun 14, 2018 1:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is political bottom-feeding. Keep in on file for the next time he is sacrificing one of his MPs to the rumour mill.
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Jun 28, 2018 8:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Andrew Coyne: Trudeau has to say something about groping accusation. Yet what can he say?

What this opaque, third-person, lawyerly non-denial does not begin to deal with — what it hopes the public will ignore — is that all of this is real



Justin Trudeau at the second annual Kokanee Summit in Creston, B.C., on Sunday Aug. 6, 2000.Handout


Andrew Coyne
Andrew Coyne



June 27, 2018
9:41 PM EDT

Filed under
Full Comment


He has to address this.

Ever since the story first surfaced — or rather, resurfaced — that Justin Trudeau had allegedly groped a young reporter for the Creston Valley Advance in 2000, his office has been issuing, and reissuing, the same statement. The prime minister “remembers being in” the small British Columbia town for an event at the time, “but doesn’t think he had any negative interactions there.”

It is hard to imagine how they could believe this would suffice. Yes, the events in question allegedly took place 18 years ago, when he was not yet in politics. Yes, it is unclear what exactly he is accused of. And yes, his accuser has refused to comment publicly. But, seriously: “he doesn’t think he had any negative interactions”?

What this opaque, third-person, lawyerly non-denial does not begin to deal with — what it hopes the public will ignore — is that all of this is real. This isn’t some bad dream that will pass if the prime minister ignores it long enough. The Creston Valley Advance is a real paper. The reporter is real; she has chosen not to reveal her identity publicly, but her name is known. The editor and publisher of the paper at the time are real. They have told the National Post that she confided in them about the alleged assault shortly after it happened, and that they believed her.

And whatever it was he did or did not do, the “interaction” apparently made her angry enough not only to tell her superiors, but to tell the world: it is understood she wrote the editorial that appeared some days later in the paper, protesting at Trudeau’s alleged inappropriate “handling” and “groping” of her. It was that editorial, republished by Frank magazine in April, that brought the story to national attention.
See AlsoWhy an 18-year-old groping allegation against Justin Trudeau is not a #MeToo moment

So this can’t just be dismissed as fake news. This isn’t some rent-a-victim recruited by the prime minister’s enemies to make trouble. This isn’t a publicity-seeker in need of national attention. This isn’t someone remembering an ambiguous incident years later and reinterpreting it in a different and harsher light.

This is a complaint made at the time — including, by her own (again, contemporaneous) account, to the 28-year-old Trudeau, who the editorial said apologized, with this odd defence: “If I had known you were reporting for a national paper” — the Advance was then part of the same chain as the National Post — “I never would have been so forward.”

Now, none of this may have happened. An accusation, even a contemporaneous one, is not proof of guilt. He may never have touched her, inappropriately or otherwise, or said the words attributed to him. Perhaps she misinterpreted his actions or intentions. Perhaps he misinterpreted hers. Perhaps — it happens, rarely — she made the whole thing up.

Still, if you had to say, based on the facts at hand: what is most likely to be the case? Is it likely, given the glowing assessment both her former editor and former publisher gave of her to the Post, that she was either so delusional or so dishonest as to tell each of them, separately and immediately after the fact, that the former prime minister’s son had groped her, when in fact he had not?

And if the more likely scenario is that she was telling the truth then, what do we make of his long silence now? And of the terse piece of studied vagueness the PMO has been putting about on his behalf?


The prime minister would appear to have some explaining to do

-

He doesn’t think he had any “negative interactions,” whatever those might be, because he didn’t? Or because he did, but doesn’t remember them? If the former, why not say so? If the latter, is that really something you could just forget? Again: it would be one thing if she had raised no objection to his behaviour in the moment, and he had only learned much later that she had taken offence. But the editorial says he apologized at the time, albeit “a day late.”

The prime minister would appear to have some explaining to do. He has to say something, and he has to say it himself — he can’t just leave it to his media relations people. Yet what can he say? If he says flat out that it never happened, any of it, he risks being accused of victim-shaming: it was, after all, this prime minister who admonished the public that we should believe all such accusations.

On the other hand, if he acknowledges even having had an unpleasant confrontation with the reporter, never mind the misconduct of which he is accused, he admits that the story his office has been repeating for the past few weeks, that he “doesn’t think” there were any “negative interactions,” is a lie — unless he only just recalled it.

If he confessed “I did it. It was a fleeting moment of madness for which I apologized at the time, and which I regret today,” that would not be the worst thing in the world, assuming no other cases emerged. Except that, having famously established, with great fanfare, a zero tolerance policy for his party and himself in such matters, with no statute of limitations, he would then have to explain why he should not have to pay the same price that others have had to pay for similar offences.

There are two issues here, in sum. There is the matter of what went on between two people in a small town in B.C. in August of 2000. And there is the prime minister’s continuing refusal to address it, and the many reasons why this might be so.


https://nationalpost.com/opinion/andrew-coyne-the-prime-minister-has-to-say-something-about-groping-accusation-and-yet-what-can-he-say
Bugs





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PostPosted: Sat Jul 07, 2018 11:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Trudeau has exonerated himself on the same evidence that he used to end the political careers of two of his MPs, Massimo Pacetti abd Scott Andrews, who were suspended without even being given a reason why, let along an opportunity to test the evidence.

https://nationalpost.com/news/politics/two-liberal-mps-suspended-from-caucus-after-sexual-harassment-allegations

But it's only typical of the two-tiered nature of what we laughingly call Canadian just-us. Why is every male in Canada presumed to be guilty when the Stunned One gets the presumption of innocence? Who is he, Bill Clinton or somebody like that?

But look at how the press has muffled this. Oh, sure, a modest bit of snark from a couple of marginals, and Coyne, but not really much. Nothing like the surprise Massimo's wife got when she turned on the news that day.

This is why this nonsense has to be stood up to. It never works for our side. The left tolerates the very behaviour they decry in their opponents. It goes nowhere. If we had faith in procedure, we ought to demand it be used before guilt is assigned. You know, evidence ... stuff like that!
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 08, 2018 1:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hypocrisy is at the crux of the Trudeau groping allegation



The prime minister and his defenders are asking for a type of consideration previously denied to others


Robyn Urback · CBC News · Posted: Jul 08, 2018 2:41 PM ET | Last Updated: 12 minutes ago



In the past, Trudeau has said that the same standards would apply to him if an accusation of sexual misconduct is levied his way. It appears he changed his mind. (Julie Debeljak/CBC)


1 comments


This is about hypocrisy — not about what did or did not happen at a music festival 18 years ago.


It is about "believing women," until it happens to you; about taking all allegations of sexual misconduct seriously, except if they happen to pass some arbitrary expiration date. It is about employing an unwavering zero-tolerance policy, which, in practice, ends up showing some tolerance for the man at the top.


It is about having one set of standards for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and another set of standards to everyone else. That's the issue. Not what did or did not happen in Creston, B.C.


For the record, there is no dispute from the two parties in question that something happened at that music festival back when Trudeau was a 28-year-old schoolteacher, before he entered politics.


An editorial published at the time in the Creston Valley Advance accused Trudeau of "groping" a young reporter — an allegation the woman re-affirmed in a statement issued last week.


Trudeau initially and bizarrely claimed he did not recall any "negative interactions," then conceded that, yes, there was some sort of encounter, but he believes he did not act inappropriately. Nevertheless, Trudeau says he apologized at the time because he knows that "the same interactions can be experienced very differently from one person to the next."


The expectation now is that everyone just move on, in part, because the woman in question says she has put the ordeal behind her and just wants to move on. That much is understandable: This woman is now caught in an unwelcome political firestorm because of something that happened to her nearly 20 years ago. For that reason, many have insisted this incident be dropped altogether.


That would, however, create a terribly harmful precedent. Indeed, we should not ignore misconduct in cases where the target of an unwelcome advance wants her privacy. If nothing else, it would suggest that we cannot right a wrong unless a victim actively participates. But we should strive to be able to both protect women and to hold powerful men to account.


Prime Minister Justin Trudeau was asked for his reaction to a statement released by the reporter who alleged he groped her 18 years ago at a charity event. 2:58

What's more, this is not a situation where an incident was dug up out of nowhere and put on the public record without the woman's permission. For better or worse, this encounter was already on the public record in the form of a published, public editorial. The suggestion that we put the genie back in the bottle now is moot.


Ironically, there is at least one recent occasion when a private allegation was put on the public record without the complainants' express permission: That is, in late 2014 when Trudeau went public with allegations against against MPs Scott Andrews and Massimo Pacetti, without telling the women involved — two NDP MPs — in advance. The women felt blindsided, according to the NDP whip at the time.


Trudeau is himself therefore guilty of publicizing a misconduct allegation without the complainants' permission, which makes the suggestion that we now drop the matter concerning the prime minister's conduct — conduct that was already put on the public record — rather rich. It's that conspicuous double-standard, rearing its head again.


Liberal MP Kent Hehr is now out of cabinet because of inappropriate words, though not physical contact. (CBC)


The crux here is that the Trudeau and his defenders are asking for a type of leniency and consideration not afforded to other politicians similarly accused of misconduct. MP Kent Hehr, for example, is now out of cabinet because of inappropriate words, though not physical contact. And MPs Andrews and Pacetti were suspended first, investigated later, when allegations against them first surfaced.


Pacetti, in fact, has used the same defence that Trudeau is now employing in response to allegations that he acted inappropriately. Pacetti, who was accused of having sex without explicit consent with a female MP, has always maintained that he believed the sexual encounter, in which she provided the condom, was entirely consensual. She says it was not. To borrow Trudeau's words: the same interaction was viewed very differently from one person to the next.


This is not a judgment on whether the Pacetti incident was indeed consensual, or to suggest that groping and non-consensual sex are in any way on a par, but simply an observation that the excuse used in both cases — I didn't think I was doing anything wrong — was unacceptable in Pacetti's case (he was permanently removed from caucus), but is now permissible in Trudeau's.

Applying universal standards


In the past, Trudeau has said that the same standards would apply to him if an accusation of sexual misconduct is levied his way. It appears he changed his mind.


Practically speaking, however, there is probably no point to launching a formal investigation of this allegation now. The most it would do is uncover a few additional details, for which Trudeau would then apologize, leaving us in the same place we are now. The prime minister will not suspend himself or — as been suggested by some fervent critics — resign.


If we really want to move forward, we don't need an investigation. We need an admission that these things are complicated. That "believe women" as a blanket approach to each and every accusation sounds good in theory, but can be problematic in practice. That we can take allegations extremely seriously without having to reflexively believe them. That punishing before investigating is wrong. That there are scales of wrongdoing, and that we can make room for people to learn from their mistakes, while simultaneously showing no tolerance for those who commit the worst ones.

The prime minister is now experiencing first-hand how a one-size-fits all approach to dealing with accusations of sexual misconduct is extremely fraught. But instead of conceding that admission, he is simply changing the standard to a one-size-fits-most: Everyone except the prime minister. That's the issue. It's the hypocrisy, not the act.


https://www.cbc.ca/news/opinion/trudeau-groping-allegation-1.4738492
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 08, 2018 2:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

To be honest, I am inclined to believe Justin, in the sense that there's drunken lout behaviour and there's real forced sex. Under the rules of the day -- no means no -- Justin made a pass and was rebuffed, and went away.

We don't know much about the actual case. This is B.S. of this whole discussion -- it assumes the woman is an innocent maiden and without motive, and that is anything but the case with the trust-fund child of Margaret.

Some women 'target' guys like that -- particularly when they're such obvious 'tricks'.

Young women routinely act and dress depending on what reactions they want. In this case, the complainant is a starting reporter ... she wants a story, and she approaches him. (The greatest aphrodesiac/ Ambition!) There's the future ex-Prime Minister of Canada ... her eyes widen, she has involuntary responses ... perhaps there's a scent in the air. Justin closes in and grabs her ass.

Women know what I am talking about. You can't really judge these events without the context and her role in creating the situation. The basic rule (in courts) is that all women share the virtues of the very best of women, so questoning can't get too cynical lest you besmirch feminity itself. Particularly if she's young and fetching.

The whole procedure ignores that the basic set-up of courtship is a man must break the rules of etiquette to show his interest, and the female part is to lure him into that if she's interested. Or to turn him off by not responding. And that's what churns the social world for twenty-somethings.

What's wrong with this is exactly the hypocrisy, but also the stab-in-the-back that he gave his supporters, without even listening to their side of the story! In the case of Massimo, she provided the condom, but she never gave "affirmative consent" -- she just wriggled out of her panty girdle as fast as she could, but never said "Yes"! His 'victim later is accused of stalking a young soldier ... who never said "Yes" ...
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2018 12:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
“I’m responsible for my side of the interaction, which certainly, as I said, I don’t feel was in any way untoward,” Mr. Trudeau said at the news conference.

“But at the same time, this lesson that we are learning – and I’ll be blunt about it – often a man experiences an interaction as being benign or not inappropriate, and a woman, particularly in a professional context, can experience it differently.”


https://www.theglobeandmail.com/politics/article-trudeau-acknowledges-he-apologized-to-woman-after-music-festival/

I don't disagree with the Prime Minister at all;
But is this the new standard we are going with moving forward or strictly in the case where the Prime Minister is the one facing the accusation?

Because this not how the current government has addressed issues within their own caucus or with the opposition ranks over the last two years.

All that aside;

This story resurfaced about a month ago?
The PMO had more than 30 days to prep for this before anyone in the media opted to even bother with a follow up question and that press conference over the weekend was the best they could do?

Patrick Brown had hours and came off marginally worse.

Whoever is handling communication within the PMO over the last ten days has been a disaster.
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Trudeau accused of misconduct against reporter in 2000

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