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Bugs





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PostPosted: Thu May 24, 2018 9:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This stinks.

I have no personal animus against Singh. But his performance is making Abdrew Scheer look like the only alternative. I want to see the competitive level raised. Leadership in our country is a desperate shape.

Singh is going about it like an ethnic politician. He is looking for a riding with a large number of Sikhs.

He has the looks and charm. But he has no "feel' for the underground issues. For example, probably he's less than 'reliable' on all this stuff about gender'. But you wonder if his heart is really into carbon taxes and the like.

The Left has to look at this. Their party has no social energy behind it. It should wither away -- otherwise, it will be up for grabs for any organized group that wants to manipulate the political landscape. In our day, with automatic funding, these organizations stay on, like zombies, waiting to be animated by a new energy ... sometimes which has nothing to do with their traditions. They become astroturf, replacing grassroots.
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2018 9:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( singh is confident he can turn things around but he's yet to explain where or how he plans to get a seat in the house )



‘I’m confident I can turn it around.’ Jagmeet Singh on hitting the reset button

By Rachel Gilmore. Published on Jun 25, 2018 9:37am



As Parliament rose for the summer, NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh was still shaking off a brutal byelection loss. That’s after a tumultuous year where the NDP ejected a member of caucus, trailed in party fundraising and had a leader with no seat in Parliament.

For Singh, it’s time for a reset.

“I’m confident I can turn it around,” Singh told iPolitics during an exclusive interview Thursday.

“Summer is a time to do a little bit of a reset, a little bit of a reboot and make sure I can get the systems in place that really help us engage and…inspire people to be a part of the movement.”

That’s exactly what he’ll have to do if he hopes to lead a competitive NDP into the looming election, scheduled for a little over a year from now. At least that’s what Singh’s predecessor, Tom Mulcair, recently told Vassy Kapelos on CBC’s Power & Politics. Mulcair called the recent test of public opinion that took place in the Chicoutimi—Le Fjord byelection “an outward sign that there’s still a lot of things that have to be done differently.”

The Conservative candidate won the riding with 52.7 per cent of the vote. The Liberals finished second with just under 30 per cent of the vote, while the NDP finished a distant third, winning just 8.7 per cent of the vote in a riding they won in 2011 and finished in a close second in 2015.

Mulcair said the NDP should be “worried” about the future. But Singh said he’s got a plan.

“We’ve got to make sure our message connects with people,” he told iPolitics.

His strategy for the upcoming election is to point out the contrast between him and the other leaders, especially with respect to the environment.

“You can’t be a climate leader when you spend billions of public dollars on an old leaky pipeline. You just can’t,” Singh said, referring to the government’s decision to purchase the Trans Mountain pipeline.

He also said his party plans to champion a number of progressive issues, such as building an inclusive economy, pushing for reconciliation with Indigenous peoples, prioritizing workers and fighting for tax fairness.

“We’ve got a vision about how we can put people first, how we can make sure that no one’s left behind, [how] we build that inclusive economy, and that’s what we’ve really got to double down on,” Singh said.

However, he will have to to take that task on with a lot less cash in his pocket. As Gloria Galloway reported for The Globe and Mail, the NDP is facing fundraising woes. Their donors are down, and the donations those few donors are making are also low. When asked how he plans to overcome the party’s cashflow problem, Singh said he believes he can boost their fundraising numbers.

“We’re going to work really hard to [connect] to people and in figuring out issues and ideas that inspire people to join the movement and to be more engaged,” Singh said — although he didn’t expand on exactly how the NDP will do all that.

“I was able to put up some good fundraising numbers in my leadership,” he added.

In the time since Singh became party leader — a position he won in a first round vote on October 1, 2017 — he’s come under fire for something else: not having a seat in the House of Commons. While byelections have come and gone, Singh has yet to confirm where and when he’ll run for a seat alongside his colleagues in Commons. And after a sitting that included behavioural issues emerging from some members of his caucus — such as Erin Weir, who was booted from the NDP over harassment allegations — and a tough byelection loss, even Mulcair is telling Singh he needs to get a seat.

Singh, however, said his lack of a seat hasn’t stopped him from setting the agenda for his party.

“I still provide the direction. So I set the tone, I help make the decisions about where we’re going to vote on something. I’ve got a team that implements my vision,” he said.

He added that he’s proud of how he handled the harassment allegations that hit his party over the last couple of months.

“Though it’s obviously not something that we wish happened…[it] happened. And what the response has been in the past is kind of to ignore it, or to…brush it under the carpet and not really talk about it, not address it,” Singh said.

“I’ve chosen to say ‘listen, I’m not going to ignore it.’ If something comes to my attention, I’ve got to take action.”

Singh also assured iPolitics that he will get a seat — eventually.

“I’m sure it’ll happen in the future, at some point,” he said. “I do miss being in question period, if I’m honest,” Singh said.

“I loved question period as a provincial member. It’s fun, I enjoy holding the government to account…I’m sure there’ll be a time when I’ll do it again.”

Between securing a seat, boosting fundraising, quelling caucus drama and moving beyond byelection blunders, Singh has quite the challenge on the horizon ahead of the 2019 election. But when the going gets tough, the new federal leader remembers what drives him to do the job.

“I have a core belief that drives me, it’s something my mom taught me,” he said, “I really believe that we’re all connected. There’s a connection that links us together as people, as humans, and even that links us to the planet…seeing that connection makes you want to do something about it.”

“I’ve faced a little bit of injustice in my life and I’ve seen some struggles and I know how that feels, and I want to make sure that we build a world where that doesn’t impact other people.”


https://ipolitics.ca/2018/06/25/im-confident-i-can-turn-it-around-jagmeet-singh-on-hitting-the-reset-button/
Bugs





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PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2018 9:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Imagine Jagmeet's problem.

First of all, the party is broke. I am told it is demoralized in the wake of the Mulcair demolition job. The party is slated to go back to Audrey levels -- 20 or 30 seats.

Second, it has been ideologically scooped by the Liberals. Who's more 'social justicey' than Justin Trudeau?

Third, it has nothing on offer politically that the Liberals won't match or better.

Fourth, Jagmeet has been stained by his first political love, Sikh nationalism. Put differently, he's more of a Sikh ex-pat than a Canadian ... It's as if he feels that himself, and is hesitant to enter the fray because he knows he doesn't react the same way mainstream Canadians react. He has to watch and test the winds.

Fifth, it isn't clear that he can win a non-ethnic seat, personally.

The sad part of it, from the NDP point of view, is that he was probably the best choice available to them.

The failure of the NDP is becoming The Stunned One's biggest electoral asset.
Toronto Centre





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PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2018 3:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
The failure of the NDP is becoming The Stunned One's biggest electoral asset.

The NDP do not operate in the US.
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2018 3:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For all the flack that Mulcair gets,
I would argue the NDP would have been far worse off had they not opted for Mulcair over Topp.

Quebec gave them the majority of their caucus in 2011 and more than a third in 2015;
At the end of the day the flirtation with Quebec and the NDP was dependent on the NDP reciprocating that "love" and while Mulcair led the NDP back into third place it was still their second best finish by way of seats in their history both Nationally and within Quebec.

By selecting a leader in 2017 not from Quebec and not from BC you effectively put yourself in an uphill battle to begin with.

With the NDP being less of a factor in Quebec and Ontario it allows for urban seats that were NDP to go Liberals it also hinders the vote splitting that some CPC seats in Quebec benefited from.

It also makes the CPC securing the 905 belt more challenging is the NDP finds itself in single digits in many of those ridings outside of Brampton.

The NDP implosion is likely one of the factors in any consideration for a snap election;
While the LPC may lose seats out West and in Ontario they are banking on adding the majority of the NDPs seat east of Manitoba.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2018 10:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had the opposite feeling. Mulcair was losing support in Quebec before the election campaign started, and continued to lose it.

This was bad because Mulcair had promised the party that only he could keep the NDP seats in Quebec. But he spent all the money, broke the rules, and reeked of personal ambition. He banked on the bandwagon effect, the look of success, and that his personal force would crush the Liberal leader, leaving him the leader of a coalition government that would bring in proportional representation and rule for the forseeable future.

That was, in fact, the realistic expectation -- except that Mulcair held Trudeau in such obvious contempt (at times) that it was uncomfortable to watch. By the time Justin got his own back, if you'll recall, even Conservatives were cheered.

People put Mulcair side-by-side with the Stunned One, and chose the Stunned One! It was because Mulcair found a magical mix of disagreeableness and smugness. He made the natural politeness and easy manners of Justin seem sophisticated by comparison. The Liberals used Justin to attract another half million voters to the polls, and I don't think any of them thought Mulcair was an option because of his revolutionary day-care proposals.

What would have happened if Jack had survived to fight another election? Nobody can be sure, but in his last campaign, with his cane, and his plucky attitude, his sense of humour, and his native Quebec French, he hit a warm spot that it's unlikely anyone else could have filled. But Mulcair was almost Layton's opposite. Where Layton was laid back and relaxed, Mulcair was cranky, a driven man with a destiny to fulfil.
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2018 2:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
For all the flack that Mulcair gets,
I would argue the NDP would have been far worse off had they not opted for Mulcair over Topp.

Quebec gave them the majority of their caucus in 2011 and more than a third in 2015;
At the end of the day the flirtation with Quebec and the NDP was dependent on the NDP reciprocating that "love" and while Mulcair led the NDP back into third place it was still their second best finish by way of seats in their history both Nationally and within Quebec.

By selecting a leader in 2017 not from Quebec and not from BC you effectively put yourself in an uphill battle to begin with.

With the NDP being less of a factor in Quebec and Ontario it allows for urban seats that were NDP to go Liberals it also hinders the vote splitting that some CPC seats in Quebec benefited from.

It also makes the CPC securing the 905 belt more challenging is the NDP finds itself in single digits in many of those ridings outside of Brampton.

The NDP implosion is likely one of the factors in any consideration for a snap election;
While the LPC may lose seats out West and in Ontario they are banking on adding the majority of the NDPs seat east of Manitoba.




true that Outremont would be an obviously pickup but most of the other 15 ndp ridings in quebec have rarely ever been liberal going back to 1993 . I'm not sure if some of those ridings would be easy liberal pick ups , seats they have never won in recent memory

like Hochelaga which had been a bloc stronghold before it went ndp in 2011 , its never really been liberal recently and not sure if the quebec liberals even did well in a lot of these ridings

Saint Hyacinthe is another ndp riding which had been bloc before and never really been liberal in recent history , a type of riding I could see a stronger liberal candidate splitting the vote with the ndp mp and possibly allowing for the conservatives to win oddly enough
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Wed Jun 27, 2018 9:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:
cosmostein wrote:
For all the flack that Mulcair gets,
I would argue the NDP would have been far worse off had they not opted for Mulcair over Topp.

Quebec gave them the majority of their caucus in 2011 and more than a third in 2015;
At the end of the day the flirtation with Quebec and the NDP was dependent on the NDP reciprocating that "love" and while Mulcair led the NDP back into third place it was still their second best finish by way of seats in their history both Nationally and within Quebec.

By selecting a leader in 2017 not from Quebec and not from BC you effectively put yourself in an uphill battle to begin with.

With the NDP being less of a factor in Quebec and Ontario it allows for urban seats that were NDP to go Liberals it also hinders the vote splitting that some CPC seats in Quebec benefited from.

It also makes the CPC securing the 905 belt more challenging is the NDP finds itself in single digits in many of those ridings outside of Brampton.

The NDP implosion is likely one of the factors in any consideration for a snap election;
While the LPC may lose seats out West and in Ontario they are banking on adding the majority of the NDPs seat east of Manitoba.




true that Outremont would be an obviously pickup but most of the other 15 ndp ridings in quebec have rarely ever been liberal going back to 1993 . I'm not sure if some of those ridings would be easy liberal pick ups , seats they have never won in recent memory

like Hochelaga which had been a bloc stronghold before it went ndp in 2011 , its never really been liberal recently and not sure if the quebec liberals even did well in a lot of these ridings

Saint Hyacinthe is another ndp riding which had been bloc before and never really been liberal in recent history , a type of riding I could see a stronger liberal candidate splitting the vote with the ndp mp and possibly allowing for the conservatives to win oddly enough


I don't think recent history will be that applicable in Quebec if these new numbers hold;
The BQ by some polling is closer to the GPC in 5th than the NDP in 3rd.

The gap between the CPC and the LPC and everyone else in Quebec is widening;
Much in the same manner the NDP swept in during the 2011 Election you could see a simple Red / Blue patch work across Quebec.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Jun 27, 2018 9:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What if we look at the Quebec electorate as an entity, deciding its collecctive future? Rather than the momentary jigs and jags of polls?

There is a big chunk of Quebec voters who are looking for an alternative party to vote for, other than the Liberals, but they don't trust the Conservatives. They will try almost anything else, even the NDP ...

It's been like that since ADSCAM. Harper tried, but the CBC crowd screwed him because of vague and non-existent threats to the "culture". It doesn't take much.

But they have tried just about everybody else. A dramatic gesture recognizing the problem, but addressing the bigger issues ... if only the Conservatives were capable of something other than loyalty ...
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 27, 2018 11:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
What if we look at the Quebec electorate as an entity, deciding its collecctive future? Rather than the momentary jigs and jags of polls?

There is a big chunk of Quebec voters who are looking for an alternative party to vote for, other than the Liberals, but they don't trust the Conservatives. They will try almost anything else, even the NDP ...

It's been like that since ADSCAM. Harper tried, but the CBC crowd screwed him because of vague and non-existent threats to the "culture". It doesn't take much.

But they have tried just about everybody else. A dramatic gesture recognizing the problem


At a minimum we are seeing some validity to rural and Eastern Quebec's support shifting to validate the polling we are seeing for the CPC in Quebec if only by last weeks result.

Regardless, I agree that a unifying gesture is needed;
While the current Federal Government is grappling with NAFTA, someone should be looking at alternate markets for our significant exports.

As I said elsewhere;
Something like Energy East gives Economic Benefit to East and West.

Historically its been a West Vs Quebec approach;
Something like this with alternative within Quebec to the originally proposed Cacouna, Quebec Marine Export Terminal and the existing Terminal in Canaport in New Brunswick would tie the economic fates together.

70% of the Energy East is already in place and could be utilized in the near term which would be beneficial if oil continues to climb.
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 27, 2018 12:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Trust me when I say that the things you mention -- energy connections, etc -- are fundamentally important. More important than gestures.

Let me try this out on you. Where Conservatives are totally shellacked in politics in having a place in the larger narrative. The name 'Conservative' sounds dusty and olde-fashioned. It was also bound up in the 'British connection' -- which wasn't a bad thing at one time, even amongst French-speaking Canadians.

Why is there no sense of a 'conservative' vrs a 'Liberal' way of doing things?

The result is that the Liberals and Separatists get to write the Conservative narrative. And this is the realm where the debate is played out on a larger media stage, and everything is always judged by the larger 'narrative' ... an example: the 'dividing refugee families' issue in the US. We know now the existing practice went back to a court decision, not a policy decision. The Obama people build to 'cages', for example. But it is contrived to create a narrative of mean old Daddy Warbucks breaking up refugee families, just like they did at Auschwitz. And metaphorically, Trump is Mengele.

The upshot was the cover of Time magazine, in which every element is photoshopped from illegitimate sources. But they go with it because it captures the narrative. Bingo, they score in the political realm.

That's how the public mood is swayed in our time. Is it different in Canada? Yeah, it is -- there is only one side knows how to play this game.

How was the Duffy anything else but an event staged for the media and to be used for political purposes? And, to me, this is the real reason I despise Mulcair. I think he had connections inside the so-called "justice system" to make it happen. Think of the preposterousness of the case. They weren't interested in jailing Duffy as much as staining Harper. Aside from that, which is a speculation, there was the media persona of Harper himself -- cold, calculating, the tool of oilmen, willing to sell the environment out so a few greedy Albertans Where did this come from? It's the narrative ...

We have no narrative of Trudeau's Liberals, even though we have the clear pattern of the McGuinty machine. Why are we not on the same course, only nationally? Why aren't we sounding an alarm?
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 27, 2018 12:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
RCO wrote:
cosmostein wrote:
For all the flack that Mulcair gets,
I would argue the NDP would have been far worse off had they not opted for Mulcair over Topp.

Quebec gave them the majority of their caucus in 2011 and more than a third in 2015;
At the end of the day the flirtation with Quebec and the NDP was dependent on the NDP reciprocating that "love" and while Mulcair led the NDP back into third place it was still their second best finish by way of seats in their history both Nationally and within Quebec.

By selecting a leader in 2017 not from Quebec and not from BC you effectively put yourself in an uphill battle to begin with.

With the NDP being less of a factor in Quebec and Ontario it allows for urban seats that were NDP to go Liberals it also hinders the vote splitting that some CPC seats in Quebec benefited from.

It also makes the CPC securing the 905 belt more challenging is the NDP finds itself in single digits in many of those ridings outside of Brampton.

The NDP implosion is likely one of the factors in any consideration for a snap election;
While the LPC may lose seats out West and in Ontario they are banking on adding the majority of the NDPs seat east of Manitoba.




true that Outremont would be an obviously pickup but most of the other 15 ndp ridings in quebec have rarely ever been liberal going back to 1993 . I'm not sure if some of those ridings would be easy liberal pick ups , seats they have never won in recent memory

like Hochelaga which had been a bloc stronghold before it went ndp in 2011 , its never really been liberal recently and not sure if the quebec liberals even did well in a lot of these ridings

Saint Hyacinthe is another ndp riding which had been bloc before and never really been liberal in recent history , a type of riding I could see a stronger liberal candidate splitting the vote with the ndp mp and possibly allowing for the conservatives to win oddly enough


I don't think recent history will be that applicable in Quebec if these new numbers hold;
The BQ by some polling is closer to the GPC in 5th than the NDP in 3rd.

The gap between the CPC and the LPC and everyone else in Quebec is widening;
Much in the same manner the NDP swept in during the 2011 Election you could see a simple Red / Blue patch work across Quebec.




the bloc won 10 seats in 2015 , I'm not sure of the status of those 10 mp's as some formed there own group

but those 10 ridings are - La Pointe de l'lle , Becancour - Nicolet - Saurel , Joliette , Mirabel , Montcalm , Pierre Boucher Les Patriotes , Repentigny , Riviere du Nord , Terrebonne , Manicouagan


I was looking thru there recent history and none of the ridings appears to have been liberal going back to 1993 but 9 of them with the exception of Louis Plamondon's seat went ndp in 2011 , also none of the 10 ridings has been cpc recently either

( although the liberals have had some recent success at winning non traditional seats in quebec , Lac saint Jean by election was one example as it had not been liberal since the 70's or 80's I recall , Laurentides Labelle , Riviere des Mille Iles and the Quebec riding in Quebec city had also not been liberal in a long time )

obviously if the bloc does not recover and find a stable leader they will lose some of these ridings in 2019 , although I think they could still recover by then , actually think they have a better chance to do so in quebec than the ndp does
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Jun 27, 2018 1:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

These are the people who don't trust the federal government ... they actively look for another party to support. They don't dominate everywhere, but even people who aren't so determined about it agree with them -- up to a point. But they see an independent Quebec is a bit of fluff, internationally, a country of six or seven million, maybe, distinct in language but having little weight in the world politically or economically. And, occupationally, a dead end.

That's what the later generations are dealing with. They could do with allies.
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 12, 2018 6:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the conservatives say they will run a candidate against Singh , don't believe that breaks with tradition as it was normally governments which don't run candidates against new opposition leaders not other opposition parties )



NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh won't have a free pass if he runs in a byelection



Liberals, Conservatives appear unwilling to follow a parliamentary convention the NDP has ignored before



Éric Grenier · CBC News · Posted: Jul 12, 2018 4:00 AM ET | Last Updated: 3 hours ago


NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh is without a seat in the House of Commons, with more than a year to go before the 2019 federal election. (Sean Kilpatrick/Canadian Press)


42 comments


If NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh wants a seat in Parliament before next year's federal election, he'll have to fight for it.

The Conservatives say they will run a candidate against Singh if he decides to throw his hat into the ring in a future byelection, marking a break of sorts with parliamentary convention. The Liberals are noncommittal.


"We'll be running a candidate," said Cory Hann, director of communications for the Conservatives, in an email.

The Liberals "would welcome the opportunity to present a candidate in any riding which becomes vacant," said Marjolaine Provost, manager of media relations with the party, in response to a question about the Liberals' intentions should Singh seek a seat before the general election.

But the spokesperson subsequently added that "the Liberal Party has made no formal decisions on nominations or candidates" as the byelections haven't been called yet.

In the past, a party leader without a seat in the House of Commons generally has been given a free pass by the other parties when running in a byelection in a riding previously held by that leader's party. But Singh will not be offered that courtesy if he decides to run in one of the byelections likely to be held before the end of the year.

Singh may be thinking hard about whether he is still comfortable working outside the House. The party has been struggling lately with fundraising and in the polls. The NDP has suffered a series of disappointing byelection results. Without a leader in Ottawa every week, caucus unity is perhaps more fragile than it otherwise would be.

And as reported by the Toronto Star, Singh has opted not to take a salary from the party — a costly proposition for a man who has not seen a paycheque since resigning his seat in the Ontario provincial legislature last year.

Four byelections coming up

Singh does have options. At least four byelections will be held in the coming months — perhaps the last ones before next year's general election. Only one is for a seat that's actually vacant right now, following the death of Conservative MP Gord Brown in May. A byelection date for Brown's former eastern Ontario riding of Leeds–Grenville–Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes must be set by Oct. 30.

But other seats will become vacant soon. In April, Liberal MP Nicola Di Iorio announced he would resign his Montreal seat of St. Léonard–St. Michel over the summer. Both ridings — Brown's and Di Iorio's — are considered safe seats for the incumbent parties; neither are really plausible options for Singh.


The upcoming resignations of two NDP MPs, however, open up better prospects for Singh. The Montreal riding of Outremont will be vacant after former NDP leader Tom Mulcair officially steps aside over the summer, as will Kennedy Stewart's British Columbia seat of Burnaby South. Stewart is running to be the mayor of Vancouver in this fall's municipal election.

Neither seat would be a slam-dunk for Singh — Burnaby South was won by a narrow margin in 2015 and the NDP is struggling to hold its support in Quebec — but they're still seats where a New Democrat is the incumbent. If the Liberals or Conservatives decide not to run a candidate in those ridings, they give nothing up.

But it looks like they won't be doing that.

Inconsistent convention for a third party

The practice of allowing a leader to get into the House without opposition is a longstanding parliamentary tradition.

The most recent example at the federal level happened in 2002, when the Liberals did not put up a candidate against Stephen Harper in a byelection held shortly after he became leader of the Canadian Alliance. The courtesy also was extended to PC leaders Robert Manion in 1938, George Drew in 1948, Robert Stanfield in 1967 and Joe Clark in 2000, as well as Liberal Leader Jean Chrétien in 1990 and Alliance Leader Stockwell Day in 2000.

All but Clark, however, were seatless leaders of the Official Opposition at the time. Singh is leader of the third party — and for third parties, the convention has been less evenly applied.

The Liberals did not oppose Joe Clark, then leader of the fifth-place PC Party, when he ran for a seat in a 2000 byelection. (Andrew Vaughan/Canadian Press)

There have been fewer instances of a third party leader seeking a route to the House between general elections to begin with. Clark, in his second stint as leader of the Progressive Conservatives in 2000, was given the courtesy by the Liberals (though not by the Alliance) despite having the fifth largest caucus in the House of Commons at the time.

But when NDP leader Tommy Douglas failed to secure a seat in the 1962 and 1968 general elections, he was opposed by both the PCs and Liberals in his subsequent (successful) attempts to get into the House in byelections called shortly afterwards. If he runs, Singh apparently will be given the same treatment as Douglas.

The convention has been inconsistently applied for Official Opposition leaders as well. In 1983, when Brian Mulroney needed a seat after he became the new PC leader, both the Liberals and the NDP put up candidates against him after PC MP Elmer MacKay gave up his Nova Scotia seat for Mulroney.

Turnabout is fair play?

Perhaps the most awkward factor for the NDP is that the party has not extended the courtesy to other parties in the past. Seven times, the NDP (and its predecessor, the CCF) put up candidates against seatless leaders when they ran for office — against Chrétien in 1990, Day and Clark in 2000 and Harper in 2002, to cite examples.

Only once — against Stanfield half a century ago — did the NDP choose to not put up a candidate against a seatless leader in a byelection.

Normally, a party leader has a shot at a particular seat because a member of their caucus stepped aside to leave it vacant. But in 1969, both Manion and Douglas ran in seats vacated due to an MP's death, while Harper ran in the riding held by past Reform Party leader Preston Manning, who had resigned a few months before Harper won the Alliance leadership.

There would be some parallels to Harper's attempt if Singh decided to try his luck replacing his predecessor in Outremont, though Burnaby South — home to the NDP's top riding association fundraiser and ground zero for opposition to the Kinder Morgan pipeline — likely would be a better fit for Singh.

Leading the NDP hasn't been easy for Singh so far. So far, nobody's offering to make it any easier for him.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/grenier-singh-byelection-1.4742487
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2018 2:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

NPD Leader Jagmeet Singh fuels speculation as he visits B.C.’s Burnaby South

By Canadian Press. Published on Jul 14, 2018 9:48am



VANCOUVER — Federal New Democrat Leader Jagmeet Singh says while he has been encouraged to run for Parliament in the newly vacated British Columbia riding of Burnaby South, he won’t be making an announcement yet.

Singh spent Friday in Metro Vancouver, with two planned events in the riding that New Democrat MP Kennedy Stewart vacated last month, allowing him to run for the mayor’s seat in Vancouver.

Singh, who was elected leader last October but doesn’t have a seat in Parliament, says both Stewart and several interest groups have encouraged him to run in Burnaby South.

He says he wanted to take the opportunity to speak to British Columbians, Canadians, and particularly those in Burnaby South, about the issues impacting them.

Singh confirmed he recently met with local health-care providers who also urged him to run.

The NDP leader says while he is honoured by the warm receptions he has received in B.C., his ultimate goal is to address Canada-wide concerns.

“Issues that impact Canadians are issues of affordability, affordable housing, access to medication, these are important things we’re going to continue to talk about,” he says.

Hamish Telford, an associate professor at the University of the Fraser Valley, says he believes Singh has had difficulties attracting attention as the NDP leader because of his absence in the House of Commons.

Telford says if Singh ran in a byelection taking place near where the contentious Kinder Morgan pipeline is being expanded it could help him gain traction in the national media.

“If he joined that byelection race it would insert him at ground-zero of the pipeline debate.”

https://ipolitics.ca/2018/07/14/npd-leader-jagmeet-singh-fuels-speculation-as-he-visits-b-c-s-burnaby-south/
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Does Jagmeet Singh need a seat in the house ?

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