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RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Feb 26, 2018 4:37 pm    Post subject: Ontario health minister Eric Hoskins resigns Reply with quote

( was some other big political news out of queens park today , it was a surprise to hear the health minister was resigning )



Ontario Health Minister Eric Hoskins resigns

Hoskins makes the announcement barely 3 months before election day

CBC News Posted: Feb 26, 2018 4:22 PM ET| Last Updated: Feb 26, 2018 4:26 PM ET

Eric Hoskins announced Monday he is stepping down as Ontario's health minister.



Ontario's Health Minister Eric Hoskins announced Monday he is resigning his post and won't be running in the June provincial election.

"In leaving Queen's Park, I am determined to continue building better healthcare for all Canadians," said Hoskins in a statement. "That path and journey will become clearer in the days ahead."

Two sources close to the announcement tell CBC News that Hoskins is resigning to become the head of a federal commission to investigate options for a national Pharmacare program.

Hoskins is a doctor and an officer of the Order of Canada. He was first elected an MPP in 2009 in the Toronto riding of St. Paul's. He ran for the Ontario Liberal Party leadership in 2013. Premier Kathleen Wynne appointed him economic development minister in her first cabinet, then made him her health minister after the 2014 election.

His departure will be a blow to Wynne's cabinet, as he is the fourth senior minister to announce he will not run in the election.


http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/.....-1.4552697
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Feb 26, 2018 4:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

February 26, 2018 4:30 pm Updated: February 26, 2018 4:32 pm

Dr. Eric Hoskins resigns as Ontario’s health minister, MPP

By Nick Westoll
Digital Broadcast Journalist Global News


Dr. Eric Hoskins, Ontario’s minister of health and long-term care and the MPP for St. Paul’s, has announced he is resigning “effective immediately.”


Hoskins made the announcement in a statement posted on Twitter on Monday afternoon.

“It has been a profound privilege to represent the residents of St. Paul’s, a diverse and vibrant community in the heart of Toronto. I have tried my best to serve them well these past eight years,” he wrote.


“Likewise, I am grateful for the opportunities given to me, and the trust placed in me, by Premier Kathleen Wynne.”

He said he is “determined to continue building better health care for all Canadians


https://globalnews.ca/news/4048563/eric-hoskins-resigns/
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Feb 27, 2018 9:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( this would seem to be another blow to the wynne government , losing more cabinet talent just before the election and leaving another key Toronto riding open and without a candidate . )



Eric Hoskins resigns as Ontario's health minister and MPP for St. Paul's


Eric Hoskins resigns as health minister, MPP


Eric Hoskins resigned on Monday, forcing the Premier to make changes to a crucial cabinet position just months before the election.


The Canadian Press
Published Monday, February 26, 2018 4:35PM EST
Last Updated Monday, February 26, 2018 6:34PM EST


TORONTO -- Ontario's health minister resigned abruptly Monday, making him the fourth high-profile Liberal to step down just months ahead of a provincial election.

Eric Hoskins, who has been a member of provincial parliament for eight years, said in a statement his resignation as minister and a Liberal legislator representing a Toronto riding is effective immediately.

Hoskins gave no reason for his departure, but said he will continue to work on building the health-care system for all Canadians. A source said Hoskins is leaving for a senior federal position related to health care.


While Hoskins was health minister, the Liberals introduced a pharmacare plan that covers 4,400 medications for people under 25. The plan, which was a key plank of last year's provincial budget, took effect in January.

Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne thanked Hoskins for his work and announced that Helena Jaczek will take over as Ontario's health minister. Michael Coteau will take over Jazcek's former role of Minister of Community and Social Services and maintain his role as Minister of Children and Youth Services.

The move comes roughly a month after Wynne shuffled several senior portfolios in her cabinet to prepare for the departure of three ministers who announced they would not run in the June election.

Mitzie Hunter, who previously served as education minister, took over the advanced education portfolio from Deb Matthews.

Eleanor McMahon, the former minister of tourism, culture and sport, replaced Liz Sandals as Treasury Board president. And Steven Del Duca, who previously served as transportation minister, stepped in as minister of economic development, a post left vacant by Brad Duguid.

Matthews, Sandals and Duguid have since been appointed as parliamentary assistants to the premier or various ministers.

Many of the ministers involved in the shuffle represented ridings in the Greater Toronto Area, which will be a key battleground in the election.


https://toronto.ctvnews.ca/eric-hoskins-resigns-as-ontario-s-health-minister-and-mpp-for-st-paul-s-1.3819794
Toronto Centre





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PostPosted: Tue Feb 27, 2018 11:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Its entirely normal for Ministers to quit the party and seek riches outside of govt when they have held top positions for almost a decade.

There is burnout and suchm so this is pretty normal.

However.... perhaps he sees the writing on the wall, but then again, the PC's are imploding so who knows.
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Tue Feb 27, 2018 1:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hoskins seat wasn't at risk in the least;

I would think even in this coming election it may be amongst the safest Liberal Seats in the Province.

He also likely would have been a potential front-runner if a leadership race was held after the election.

With that said, its a sweet gig on the Federal Level which likely could lead to an opportunity to run in the St Paul seat Federally if Carolyn Bennett ever decided to leave public life.
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Feb 28, 2018 8:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Toronto Centre wrote:
Its entirely normal for Ministers to quit the party and seek riches outside of govt when they have held top positions for almost a decade.

There is burnout and suchm so this is pretty normal.

However.... perhaps he sees the writing on the wall, but then again, the PC's are imploding so who knows.



its not unusual for mpp's to step down or retire before an election , but Hoskins was not expected to be one of them , my understanding was he had been nominated in st paul's and was planning to run again


clearly he changed his mind and decided this job offer from Ottawa was better than staying at queens park
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Feb 28, 2018 8:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
Hoskins seat wasn't at risk in the least;

I would think even in this coming election it may be amongst the safest Liberal Seats in the Province.

He also likely would have been a potential front-runner if a leadership race was held after the election.

With that said, its a sweet gig on the Federal Level which likely could lead to an opportunity to run in the St Paul seat Federally if Carolyn Bennett ever decided to leave public life.



his now open St Paul's seat might be a good option for Wynne or another high profile liberal looking for a safe riding , it be much safer than some of the other 416 ridings

seems odd the liberals don't have candidates in Toronto Centre , St Paul's and University Rosedale , 3 of the safest liberal ridings in Toronto , you'd think they'd easily be able to find star candidates but so far nothing

the pc's are clearly on track to win some seats in the 416 , although its unclear if the ndp can win back some of the ridings they lost in 2014 , but at this point seems highly unlikely that Toronto will be solidly liberal on election night
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Mar 01, 2018 5:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ontario Liberals fuming over sudden departure of Eric Hoskins



Steve Paikin

Published on Mar 01, 2018


​Let’s acknowledge off the top that people enter and exit politics all the time. Sometimes the voters want you to stay. Other times, politicians say they’re leaving for health reasons.

“Yeah, the voters got sick of me,” goes the joke.

Let’s also acknowledge that if you’re a senior cabinet minister for a party that’s been in power for 15 years, there’s a right way and a wrong way to tell your premier that you’re not sticking around to help fight the good fight.

Ontario cabinet ministers Deb Matthews, Liz Sandals, and Brad Duguid all announced several months ago that they wouldn’t be standing for re-election. They did a solid for Kathleen Wynne. By giving her plenty of notice, they gave the premier time to shuffle her cabinet in a way that granted more responsibility to some existing members and promoted others from the backbench.

Then there’s the case of Eric Hoskins.

Hoskins has been the MPP for St. Paul’s for almost a decade and health minister — one of the toughest and most prestigious portfolios in any provincial government — for almost four years. He got himself nominated to run in the June election and thus gave every indication that he planned to continue serving the Ontario Liberals’ cause.

But earlier this week, he shocked his fellow party members by abruptly announcing his immediate resignation as both health minister and MPP and taking a job with the federal government to chair a panel whose mission is to develop a national pharmacare program.

“We recognize that we need a strategy to deal with the fact that not everyone has access, and we need to do it in a way that’s responsible — that deals with the gaps but doesn’t throw out the system that we currently have,” federal finance minister Bill Morneau said on Wednesday. Hoskins will be responsible for squaring that circle.

At some level, this move makes sense. Having just brought in pharmacare for Ontarians under the age of 25, Hoskins is certainly up to speed on one of the most important issues in health care today. He’s also a medical doctor and has practised his profession all over the world.

Politically, it also makes sense for Hoskins: he probably came to realize that he wasn’t going to be premier anytime soon (he ran for the Liberal leadership in 2013 and came last on the first ballot). This new job moves him to the federal arena, where he actually first ran for office (in Haldimand–Norfolk in 2008, where he lost to Conservative cabinet minister Diane Finley). Hoskins has always been an ambitious politician (nothing wrong with that; it’s sort of a prerequisite in the job), and it wouldn’t surprise anyone if, after completing his current mission, he were to consider seeking the federal Liberal nomination in St. Paul’s, should the current sitting member, Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Carolyn Bennett, decide she’s had enough of politics.

All that may make sense for Hoskins and the federal government, but none of it makes any sense for the Ontario Liberals. I’m told by a reliable, high-level provincial Liberal source that it was Hoskins who sought out the federal appointment, not vice-versa. And while Hoskins may take pains to insist this interpretation is wrong, it’s hard not to see this move as an 11th-hour stab in the back to a government that’s already fighting unpopularity and a growing sense that re-election is hopeless. (I reached out to Hoskins twice on Wednesday to get his side of the story, but he has not responded.)

Ontario Liberals will consider this a highly disloyal act. The premier was no doubt spitting bullets when she got the news, though she was classy enough to issue a press release praising Hoskins’s accomplishments during his time with the health portfolio.

Hoskins may go on to achieve great things in Canadian health care. He may actually be the guy who helps bring in a genuine national pharmacare program, an idea governments have toyed with for decades but have never actually achieved. If that happens, his legacy as a historic figure in Canadian politics will be secured.

But make no mistake: that’s not what Ontario Liberals are thinking today. They are furious at what they see as a selfish, disloyal gesture. And in politics, loyalty is everything.

https://tvo.org/blog/current-affairs/ontario-liberals-fuming-over-sudden-departure-of-eric-hoskins
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Mar 05, 2018 9:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( were finding out more about why Hoskins left queens park , this new job could pay up to $800 per day )


Hoskins’ pharmacare appointment comes with $800 per diem

By Kyle Duggan. Published on Mar 2, 2018 5:18pm


Former Ontario Health Minister Eric Hoskins, who is getting ready to head up a national pharmacare advisory council, will receive as much as $800 per day for a year, government documents show.

An order in council issued this week making Hoskins chairperson of the advisory council, and an senior adviser to the ministers of finance and health, fills in a few blanks that the announcement in the 2018 budget document doesn’t include.

To start with, while there’s no money in the budget for a pharmacare plan itself, or an amount for the advisory council, Hoskins is slated to receive a per diem in the range of $675 to $800, effective as of February 28, 2018.

The length of the contract runs until one of two things happens: the council issues its final report, or after one year from the point at which the “last of the initial members is appointed to the council.”

The order places a limit on the term, lasting until January 31, 2019. If it runs the full year, that brings the salary total to a maximum ceiling of $292,000 (if he worked every day for the full year).

A spokesperson for Health Minister Ginette Petitpas Taylor’s office said Saturday that Hoskins will be officially working part-time, which is why he’s on a per diem basis with no benefits, and that cross-Canada travel will be part of the work.

It’s not yet clear how much travelling the consulting group will do exactly, or how long the report will take to compile, and the order in council only lists a few bare-bones details about the new position.

Hoskins had announced the night before budget day that he would be resigning “effective immediately” as MPP for St. Paul’s to begin work on the consulting council. According to a CBC story from last year, Ontario cabinet ministers make $165,850 annually. His Ontario colleagues will also face an election within months.

The final report on pharmacare policy options will be delivered to the federal ministers of finance and health, likely next spring.

Finance Minister Bill Morneau has been taking flak from various universal pharmacare advocates after he appeared to start walking back the scope of what a national pharmacare program would look like just a day after the budget’s announcement.

Labour groups and NDP MPs raised ire over comments he made that seemingly preempt the study, and argued Morneau should recuse himself over a perceived conflict of interest related to his family business, which deals with benefits plans.

Morneau responded in question period Thursday that the accusation was “bizarre” and that the government is getting ready to listen to experts.

Petitpas Taylor similarly dodged questions from reporters Friday surrounding the recusal demands lobbed at Morneau, and said that she is “looking forward to all the options that are going to be recommended to us in spring.”

Meantime, the commons health committee is preparing to issue its own report looking at national pharmacare program after a two year study into the matter.

https://ipolitics.ca/2018/03/02/hoskins-pharmacare-appointment-comes-800-max-per-diem/
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Ontario health minister Eric Hoskins resigns

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