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RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
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Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Fri Jan 19, 2018 8:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

EDITORIAL: New crew, same captain

Postmedia News

More from Postmedia News



Published:
January 18, 2018


Updated:
January 19, 2018 7:39 AM EST


Filed Under:

Toronto SUN ›
Opinion ›
Editorials ›


Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne hams for the cameras as she stands next to newly appointed Minister of Economic Development and Growth, Steven Del Duca, during a swearing-in ceremony following a Cabinet Shuffle at the Ontario Legislature in Toronto on Wednesday, January 17, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young



We aren’t going to pick apart Premier Kathleen Wynne’s pre-election cabinet shuffle because the problem with the Liberal Titanic is the captain, not the crew.

With less than five months to go before the Ontario election which must be called no later than June 7, Wynne mainly promoted women MPPs either into more senior cabinet posts, or from the backbenches into cabinet.

This given the number of cabinet veterans who have announced they won’t run in the next election, a sure sign of a Liberal government that, after 15 years in power, is dragging a boatload of baggage behind it in the form of scandals and wasteful spending.

In any event, the key position in cabinet next to the premier is the finance minister.

The fact happy warrior Charles Sousa — who delivers Liberal budgets in the manner of a used car salesman — remains in the finance portfolio, indicates Wynne’s shuffle was about form, not substance.


That is, based on election considerations such as increasing the profiles of Liberal MPPs facing tough re-election fights — rather than signalling any change in Wynne’s policies.

The premier is running for re-election on a platform that argues there is such a thing as a free lunch.

That a government that has become, under the Liberals, the most indebted sub-sovereign borrower in the world, can offer discounted electricity and almost every other political goody one can imagine, without the adverse economic consequences that are the inevitable result of runaway debt.

Wynne claims to have balanced the budget this year while the Auditor General and Financial Accountability Office maintain the actual deficit is $4 billion to $4.5 billion, consistent with reckless Liberal spending every since they first came to power under Dalton McGuinty in 2003.

At that time the provincial debt was $138.8 billion. Today, its $312 billion, an increase of almost 125% and a permanent anchor on Ontario’s economy which, while it’s performing better these days along with the rest of North America, has a long way to go to recover from a lost decade of Liberal overspending, incompetence, waste and political corruption.

Re-electing Wynne will just bring Ontarians more of the same, no matter how many times she shuffles her cabinet.

http://torontosun.com/opinion/.....me-captain
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
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Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Fri Jan 19, 2018 8:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the liberal riding associations in some ridings almost seem to be admitting early on there not going to win , read this odd article from Kenora . where the liberal riding association pretty much admits if they can't find a star candidate the pc candidate is going to take the riding in June )



Kenora Liberals and NDP continue search for candidates to run in 2018 Ontario election


SHERI LAMB
Miner and News

Thursday, January 18, 2018 11:02:01 EST AM

File photo/Postmedia Network Former Kenora MP Greg Rickford was named the Progressive Conservative candidate for the Kenora-Rainy River riding late in 2017.


Time is of the essence for Ontario’s Liberals and New Democrat Party (NDP) to find star candidates of their own after the provincial Progressive Conservatives brought in former Member of Parliament Greg Rickford late last year as the province gears up for the 2018 Ontario election.

As of today, neither the provincial Liberals or NDP have a candidate in place for the next Ontario election on or before June 7. The NDP’s Sarah Campbell has represented the Kenora-Rainy River riding since 2011 at Queen’s Park, but made the decision not to run for re-election in order to concentrate on her expanding family. Campbell is due to give birth to her second child in February.

Anthony Leek, president of the Kenora-Rainy River Liberal Riding Association and a former candidate in the riding, said there’s not much movement in lining up a candidate.

“It’s pretty quiet right now. We have some feelers out to see if anyone is interested but as of now there’s no names at present that we know of that is interested, but if anyone is they can let us know,” said Leek.

In addition to going up against a star candidate in the PC’s Rickford, who served in former Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s government until his defeat in the 2015 federal election and was the first Conservative elected in the Kenora riding since 1921 when voters first sent him to Ottawa in 2008. During his years in Parliament, Rickford rose to serve as the Minister of Natural Resources in cabinet, Leek said the other issue is the provincial government’s decision to split the riding.

The northern part of the former Kenora-Rainy River riding has split off to form Kiiwetinoong, stretching from the Manitoba-Ontario boarder, north to Fort Severn and includes communities such as Grassy Narrows, Sioux Lookout and many other First Nations.

“Because the riding is split there’s a little bit of posturing that’s kind of going on in terms of feeling out what their chances might be,” said Leek. “There are volatile issues on the table that people may feel for or against that.”

The riding split also changed the dynamics of the Kenora-Rainy River riding by removing many First Nation communities from it. But, Leek said a candidate like Rickford also changed the outlook.

“When you have a star candidate in a riding that has focused on star candidates and been in positions of influence in the past they’re usually fairly successful,” said Leek, pointing out the three-way federal race in 2015 between Rickford, Howard Hampton of the NDP and the ultimate winner the Liberal’s Bob Nault. “With Rickford running provincially this time it’s very hard to find someone at that same level of calibre in the other riding associations, that’s the biggest thing, I think there’s a lot of intimidation in terms of Rickford being one of those heavy hitters. If you don’t bring in another star candidate then it makes it really tough to compete.”

Meanwhile, the NDP riding association stated in an email that it has received expressions of interest from several potential candidates to replace Campbell, and it is still accepting candidates in the nomination for a shot at running for the seat at Queen’s Park.


http://www.kenoradailyminerand.....o-election
RCO





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Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 2018 9:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

“It’s pretty quiet right now. We have some feelers out to see if anyone is interested but as of now there’s no names at present that we know of that is interested, but if anyone is they can let us know,” said Leek.




( what stands out is just how desperate this riding association is , read the above comment , they don't have a candidate and don't even know of any and actually ask newspaper readers to come forward if they were interested , seriously ? )



considering the guilty verdict in the Gas plant trial , at this point if your wynne and her team , what strategies are left going forward , all I see is a sort of well were the devil you know type of argument , to position the liberals as having not been great but better than the other options but are the other 2 options really that bad ?


the ndp government in the 90's was a disaster but BC voters forget a similar horrible 90's era ndp government and now have an ndp / green coalition , the pc's haven't been in power since 2003 , last government had it challenges but that was a long time ago , it seems the voters are ready for something new , its up to the opposition to give them the option there looking for
RCO





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Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Tue Jan 23, 2018 9:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

a new Mainstreet poll has more bad news for Wynne , although she does lead in Toronto by a small margin , but big leads for the pc's in every other region .

these numbers would indicate a clear pc majority with mpp's from every region of the province , isn't any other way to look at them . liberals would hold some seats in Toronto and Ottawa but that's about it , ndp would hold a few seats here and there but fail to become official opposition .


province wide - 43 pc , 32 lib , 18 ndp , 7 green

Toronto - 40 lib , 36 pc , 17 ndp , 6 green

GTA - 44 pc , 34 lib , 16 ndp , 6 green


East - 42 pc , 33 lib , 14 ndp , 10 green

south central - 45 pc , 23 lib , 22 ndp , 9 green

south western - 49 pc , 25 lib , 19 ndp , 5 green


north - 46 pc , 25 ndp , 20 lib , 8 green

https://www.scribd.com/document/369754270/Mainstreet-Research-Ontario-Poll-Jan23a2018?secret_password=THlfBsJffL94mHodDKB2
Bugs





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PostPosted: Tue Jan 23, 2018 3:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What strikes me is how low the NDP is polling. Even in Northern Ontario they only get one vote in five. I can't believe that they are so low-energy with the election so close.
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Tue Jan 23, 2018 5:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am always reluctant when I see NDP polling numbers this low;

I think that NDP support will likely be closer in the context of an actual election because I think NDP and PC supporters will be far more likely to be motivated to vote.

Especially in Toronto,

Just based on previous elections the NDP should have a shot at Beaches—East York, Davenport, Trinity—Spadina, even potentially York South—Weston. Thats just assuming voter motivation and turn out as they are usually competitive and have been NDP in recent memory.
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Jan 24, 2018 9:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
What strikes me is how low the NDP is polling. Even in Northern Ontario they only get one vote in five. I can't believe that they are so low-energy with the election so close.



the Ontario ndp hasn't seen the same kind of membership increase the pc's have , even with wynne's unpopularity

the ndp have tried to boost there stalled campaign by having some nomination meetings this month but most are in hopeless ridings for the ndp ( grey bruce owen sound ,barrie innisfil , Peterborough Kawartha and Northumberland Peterborough South )

I saw an article about the Peterborough one , a city where the ndp actually has some support , been getting or close to 10,000 votes most elections


but turnout for a contested nomination meeting was rather low , 2 candidates were running , both very young and inexperienced . there supporters just don't seem that interested in this election



"About 55 people were at the Burnham St. hall for the nomination meeting."

http://www.thepeterboroughexam.....-candidate
RCO





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Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Wed Jan 24, 2018 9:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
I am always reluctant when I see NDP polling numbers this low;

I think that NDP support will likely be closer in the context of an actual election because I think NDP and PC supporters will be far more likely to be motivated to vote.

Especially in Toronto,

Just based on previous elections the NDP should have a shot at Beaches—East York, Davenport, Trinity—Spadina, even potentially York South—Weston. Thats just assuming voter motivation and turn out as they are usually competitive and have been NDP in recent memory.



I agree that the ndp could do better during the actual election , we saw in the by elections the ndp did better than expected in a couple of them , Niagara west glanbrook , sault ste marie and Scarborough rouge river , they didn't win but had good results when compared to past years


whats interesting is they don't even have candidates nominated in some of the most promising ridings for the ndp ( Beaches East York , Spadina fort York , Sault Ste Marie , Sarnia Lambton , Cambridge , Guelph , Scarborough Southwest/Centre )

so either interest is light ? or there waiting for some star candidates to emerge ? it seem odd to nominate early in rather hopeless ridings but wait later for more likely ones
RCO





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Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Wed Jan 24, 2018 5:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( some more good news for the Ontario pc's , Vikram Singh has withdrawn his lawsuit relating to the Hamilton West Ancaster Dundas nomination , although I'm not sure of the outcome of the police investigation )





Ontario PC Press‏ @PCPressOffice · 25m25 minutes ago


Joint Press Release from Patrick Brown and Vikram Singh #onpoli
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Jan 24, 2018 6:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is not something you want the police involved with.

The truth is the candidate selection at these meetings is always a dubious process. Most of these elections involve less than 1000 people -- maybe that's changed over the years, but ethnic clubs or small religious congregations can be mobilized to vote for somebody as a favour. The requirement of membership is covered by someone other than the people who show up and vote. None of this is even felt to be 'crooked'.

But is having the police supervising the political process an answer? No, it isn't -- because police departments are already very political organizations. And it always leads to one law for most people and another law for thuggy politicians -- or recently retired Attorney Generals, for that matter. It also implies that some politicians have favours to repay -- maybe that time they were in the rub-and-tug 'massage parlour' perhaps, and the cops never brought a charge. We already suffer from this in Toronto -- why make it as bad in your city?
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Jan 26, 2018 8:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the sudden resignation has not lowered the pc % of support , making the decision of an intern leader that much more critical as this leader could still possibly become premier in a few months )



Sudden resignation of Patrick Brown has not dented popularity of PC party: poll



Chris Fox, CP24.com
Published Friday, January 26, 2018 6:34AM EST
Last Updated Friday, January 26, 2018 6:35AM EST


The sudden resignation of Patrick Brown amid allegations of sexual misconduct has not dented the popularity of the Ontario Progressive Conservative party, according to a new poll from Forum Research.

The poll of 751 randomly selected voters was conducted on Thursday, just hours after an early-morning statement from Brown resigning as party leader.

The poll found that the Tories still have the support of 42 per cent of decided or leaning voters compared to 27 per cent for the Liberals, 23 per cent for the NDP and 6 per cent for the Green Party.


The percentage of decided or leaning voters indicating they would vote for the Tories in the spring election was only down one point from a poll conducted two weeks ago and three points from the high-water mark recorded by the Tories in October (45 per cent).

“That the numbers for the Progressive Conservatives haven’t changed much suggests that most supporters were behind the party, and not the leader,” Forum Research President Lorne Bozinoff said in a press release. “There may be an element of cognitive dissonance in that because supporters see Brown doing the right thing, their support for the PCs is strengthened.”

Most voters are aware of allegations

The poll found that 82 per cent of respondents were aware of the allegations against Brown.

Among those aware of the allegations, 36 per cent said they would not affect their vote while 22 per cent said that the allegations would actually make them more likely to vote for a Progressive Conservative candidate in the upcoming election. Meanwhile, about 15 per cent of respondents said that the allegations would make them more likely to vote for a Liberal candidate and 12 per cent said the allegations would make them more likely to vote for a NDP candidate.

About 14 per cent of respondents said that they weren’t sure what effect the scandal would have on their vote.

Ontarians split on who should be leader

The poll also asked respondents for their choice for the next leader of the Progressive Conservative party; however there was no clear consensus that emerged.

Christine Elliot, who was the runner up in the last leadership race, had the support of 12 per cent of respondents, while Doug Ford had the support of 11 per cent of respondents.

The Progressive Conservative party caucus is meeting this morning to choose an interim leader, though it is not clear whether that person will lead the party into the next provincial election.

The poll is considered accurate to within four percentage points, 19 times out of 20.


https://www.cp24.com/news/sudden-resignation-of-patrick-brown-has-not-dented-popularity-of-pc-party-poll-1.3776447
RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Feb 03, 2018 9:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the pc's now think there is actually 133,000 members not the 200,000 that was claimed a few weeks ago )



Robert Benzie‏Verified account @robertbenzie · 2h2 hours ago

BREAKING: Interim @OntarioPCParty leader @VictorFedeli says Tories have 133,044 members -- not the 200,224 that ex-leader @brownbarrie claimed on Jan. 13. #onpoli
RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Feb 03, 2018 9:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interim Ontario PC leader says party has 67,000 fewer members than claimed

Ontario PC party interim leader Vic Fedeli
Ontario PC party interim leader Vic Fedeli is congratulated after a caucus meeting at Queen's Park in Toronto on Friday, January 26, 2018. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette)



The Canadian Press
Published Saturday, February 3, 2018 9:01PM EST



TORONTO -- The interim leader of Ontario's Progressive Conservative Party says the Tories have just over 133,000 members -- some 67,000 fewer than claimed by former leader Patrick Brown less than a month ago.

In an e-mail to the PC caucus obtained by The Canadian Press, Vic Fedeli says a check of the party's membership system this week turned up the discrepancy.

He says that within hours of Brown's sudden resignation on Jan. 25, party IT workers shut down the Tories' membership management system to protect member information.



In media interviews on Jan. 12, Brown said the party's membership had swollen to more than 200,000 people across the province.

Brown resigned after CTV News reported allegations of sexual misconduct made against him by two women.

Brown vehemently denies the allegations, which The Canadian Press has not independently verified.



https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/interim-ontario-pc-leader-says-party-has-67-000-fewer-members-than-claimed-1.3788792
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Ontario pc membership passes 200,000

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