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RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Jan 17, 2018 8:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( singh may not have a seat in the house but he managed to generate a ton of press when it was announced he was engaged to a 20 something clothing designer )


National Post‏Verified account @nationalpost · 9h9 hours ago

NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh makes it official — he's engaged to clothing designer Gurkiran Kaur http://bit.ly/2FIdYAy
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Jan 17, 2018 9:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It won't hurt. I mean, a few marriage pictures are bound to appear in the media.

The only question is: how many times does 39 go into 20?
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 17, 2018 9:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( this announcement might show how on a personality level Singh can be more dangerous to the liberals than some realise , this generated a lot of positive press for Singh and allows voters to see him in a new light , perhaps that's why he wanted it to be so public )



Federal NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh engaged to clothing designer Gurkiran Kaur

Until December, Singh had declined to confirm or deny that he was in a relationship

The Canadian Press Posted: Jan 16, 2018 11:16 PM ET| Last Updated: Jan 17, 2018 7:56 AM ET

NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh proposes to Gurkiran Kaur at an engagement party in Toronto on Tuesday.



Federal New Democratic Party Leader Jagmeet Singh pulled back the curtain on his closely guarded private life, letting Canadians know Tuesday night that he is engaged.

Singh, 38, proposed to girlfriend Gurkiran Kaur, 27, at a private party Tuesday night just blocks away from the Ontario legislature in Toronto where he served as a provincial legislator for six years.


Singh surprised Kaur, an entrepreneur and fashion designer, with the proposal in front of several dozen friends and family members at a vegetarian restaurant where they had their first date.

Singh was elected federal NDP leader last fall and had been guarded about his personal life, but social media posts in December made headlines after it was reported he and Kaur were engaged.

Singh invited media to proposal

The couple shot down the rumours, saying it was instead a "rokha" — a traditional Punjabi ceremony held ahead of a wedding and usually attended by close family.

Until December, Singh had declined to confirm or deny that he was in a relationship.

Along with friends and family, Singh invited several members of the media, including The Canadian Press, to witness the surprise proposal Tuesday night.

Singh Engaged 20180116
Singh poses with Kaur after proposing. (Frank Gunn/Canadian Press)

Friends cheered as Singh and Kaur arrived. Singh pulled a ring out of his jacket pocket and got down on one knee to propose to Kaur, who accepted.

A few moments later, the couple waded into the crowd and Kaur shouted, raising one hand in the air, "Everyone, I'm engaged!"

Asked why he decided to make this news public and what he wants Canadians to know about it, Singh said he was excited about the engagement.

"I'm super excited to take this step forward — to have a life and future together with my partner," he said.


http://www.cbc.ca/news/politic.....-1.4490736
RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Mar 31, 2018 8:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mulcair's advice to NDP leader Jagmeet Singh? Get a seat

Tom Mulcair
Former NDP leader Tom Mulcair on CTV's Question Period.



Rachel Aiello, Ottawa News Bureau Online Producer

@rachaiello
.
Published Saturday, March 31, 2018 7:00AM EDT


OTTAWA – After a tough few weeks for NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh, his predecessor Tom Mulcair is offering him some advice: get a seat in Parliament as soon as possible.

"Parliament is very important as an institution and it's important for a political leader to get in there as soon as possible so that Canadians can get to know him," Mulcair said on CTV's Question Period.

Singh has been dealing with caucus dissatisfaction over the last few weeks, most recently over his decision to discipline a long-time MP for dissenting with the party on a vote. After fellow NDP MPs publicly criticized their leader, Singh walked back the punishment. This followed members’ criticism for his level of condemnation of extremists within the Sikh separatist community.



Despite this, Singh has vowed he helms a unified caucus.

Asked about how he thinks his replacement has been doing, Mulcair said that while the New Democrat caucus is happy to have a "bright" new leader, they’d like to see him around more.

"People have been saying, 'Show up with caucus more.' I’ve always understood that the seed of your power as a leader is the caucus," Mulcair said. "What we’re hearing from caucus, and what people have been saying publicly is, ‘We want to get to know him better."

Singh, who sat as an Ontario NDP MPP for several years, has no federal experience. Without a seat in the Commons he is unable to question Prime Minister Justin Trudeau during question period the way Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer does. Singh, though, does attend the weekly national caucus meetings in Ottawa and routinely addresses the media afterwards.

"He doesn’t know the Parliament very well yet, he’s not sitting in Parliament," said Mulcair, who added he has already given the advice of running for a seat, to his successor.

Singh has maintained since winning the leadership race in October, that he’s perfectly happy to not have a seat in the House of Commons. He has said this provides him more time to outreach with people across the country.

Though, Mulcair argues the best place to have people get to know you and to raise your profile, is from the national stage of Parliament Hill.

There is currently just one vacant seat in the House of Commons, in Quebec. But during a previous interview on CTV’s Question Period, Singh has said he’s eyeing Ontario’s Brampton East seat currently held by Liberal MP Raj Grewal.

Singh has said he'd want to run in a riding where he has roots, and Brampton is the city where Singh started his political career.


https://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/mulcair-s-advice-to-ndp-leader-jagmeet-singh-get-a-seat-1.3865140
Bugs





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PostPosted: Sat Mar 31, 2018 9:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What usually happens in these cases is one of the old silverbacks resigns a safe seat so the new leader can run (and win) in a safe seat. I guess that doesn't happen in the NDP.

They're only generous with other people's stuff.
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 31, 2018 12:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
What usually happens in these cases is one of the old silverbacks resigns a safe seat so the new leader can run (and win) in a safe seat. I guess that doesn't happen in the NDP.

They're only generous with other people's stuff.




well there is Outremont , no one in the ndp said he couldn't run there . it was his own wish to represent a riding he had a connection to that disqualified him from that race .


the problem is he isn't able to offer a current mp anything , if they were to give up there job is mp , he has no job waiting for them if they leave , other than possibly something in the ndp offices but those wouldn't pay much


although if it was only " temporary " they could run again in there riding in 2019 , if singh went back to Brampton
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 2018 8:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( singh isn't exactly sitting around doing nothing , he has plans to visit PEI , although the odds of an ndp victory on the island are extremely low )


Federal NDP leader Jagmeet Singh to visit P.E.I.


The Guardian
Published: 19 hours ago
Updated: 15 hours ago


Ontario deputy NDP leader Jagmeet Singh, who spent part of his childhood in St. John's, launches his bid for the federal NDP leadership in Brampton, Ont.
Federal NDP leader Jagmeet Singh. FILE PHOTO


Federal New Democratic Party leader Jagmeet Singh will be on hand when the P.E.I. NDP chooses who will lead the party into the next provincial election.

Singh will be attending the P.E.I. NDP’s annual general meeting and leadership convention at Murphy’s Community Centre in Charlottetown on Saturday, April 7.


Leah-Jane Hayward, president of the P.E.I. NDP, said she is delighted Singh will be part of the event.

“His presence will confirm that our pursuit of social justice is a pan-Canadian social democratic endeavour, one that has deep roots in our Island,” said Hayward. “I am hoping as many Islanders as possible will take the chance to meet Jagmeet during his visit.”

Singh will hold two meet-and-greets while in P.E.I.

One will be at the leadership convention from 12:15 to 1:15 p.m., while another will be held at Timothy’s World Coffee in Charlottetown from 1:15 p.m. until 2 p.m.

Singh will also give a speech during the convention at 4 p.m.

Joe Byrne, Margaret Andrade and Susan MacVittie are the three candidates vying for the provincial party’s leadership, which has been vacant since former leader Mike Redmond’s resignation in December.

Singh described all three as outstanding candidates.

“What an exciting time to be an Island New Democrat. I am pleased to offer the full support of the federal NDP for the Island NDP in the coming provincial election,” Singh said in a statement.

“P.E.I. is legendary for compassionate, hard-working, caring people who support one another and who know what social justice entails in very practical terms. I want to hear from as many Islanders as possible during my visit.”

The three leadership candidates made their final pitches to Islanders during a debate in Summerside on Thursday.

Byrne, the first to declare his candidacy, has been involved with the P.E.I. party for more than 20 years and is best known to Islanders as Charlottetown’s federal NDP candidate in the previous two elections.

Andrade also ran federally for the NDP during the 2015 election in the Ontario riding of Leeds-Grenville-Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes. She was previously elected as a municipal councillor in Alberta.

MacVittie previously worked as an outreach organizer and scheduler for Courtenay-Alberni NDP MP Gord Johns. She has since been active with the NDP P.E.I.’s provincial council, as well as in the party’s fundraising and communication committees.


https://www.theguardian.pe.ca/news/federal-ndp-leader-jagmeet-singh-to-visit-pei-198171/
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 2018 8:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

We are a year and a bit away from the next election;

Based on what we have seen;

If the Over/Under on seats the NDP would win in 2019 was 20.5

Would anyone take the over at this point?
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 03, 2018 4:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( singh might now be open to running in other possible ridings according to this article , even possibly Outremont )


Jagmeet Singh could run for election in “any” riding — including Quebec


The NDP leader’s press secretary said Singh is “not going to close the door” to running for Tom Mulcair’s old seat in the downtown Montreal riding of Outremont.



NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh responds to questions after touring George Third & Son Steel Fabricators and Erectors, in Burnaby, B.C., on March 29, 2018. Singh has been touring Canada since being named leader in October 2017. But he doesn’t have a seat in the House of Commons and there is some talk about where he should run.



By Alex BallingallOttawa Bureau

Tues., April 3, 2018



OTTAWA—The New Democratic Party isn’t ruling out the possibility that federal leader Jagmeet Singh will run for a seat in the Montreal neighbourhood of Outremont, a riding that served as an important toehold for the party’s 2011 “Orange Wave” in Quebec.

Singh’s press secretary James Smith played down a report Tuesday in the Journal de Montréal that said Singh is “open to the idea” of running there when Tom Mulcair, the former NDP leader who won the riding in 2007, vacates the seat at the end of the current parliamentary session. But Smith did not deny the possibility that Singh could vie for the seat.

“It’s not a ‘no.’ But the byelection hasn’t even been called,” he said.

Smith said Singh is willing to consider advice on whether he should run in other ridings, too — including the rural Québec riding of Chicoutimi–Le Fjord, where a byelection will be held this spring.

“What the leader has always said is that he’s open to considering any place, and he’s open to counsel on that,” Smith said.

“I know that he’s not going to close the door.”

The NDP leader does not hold a seat in the House of Commons, and has been under pressure to spend more time in Ottawa amidst grumblings from some members of his caucus in recent weeks. MPs held an unscheduled meeting with Singh last month to discuss how he handled a slate of media reports about his attendance at events where people advocated for an independent Sikh state in India. The following week, after public criticism from NDP ranks, Singh flip-flopped on his decision to punish a veteran MP for voting against the party on a Conservative motion about the government’s decision to attach an “attestation” to respect LGBTQ and reproductive rights to applications for summer jobs funding.

Then, on Sunday, Mulcair said during an appearance on CTV’s Question Period that Singh should get a seat. “Parliament is very important as an institution and it’s important for a political leader to get in there as soon as possible so that Canadians can get to know him,” Mulcair said.


Singh succeeded Mulcair as NDP leader in October 2017, when he made the jump from provincial politics in Ontario and won the race with a majority on the first ballot. In the months since, he was repeatedly said that he’s comfortable with his decision not to rush to win a seat in the House of Commons, and has spent much of his time touring the country. Singh has previously said he has no concrete plans to seek a seat before the 2019 general election, but would run in a byelection in a riding that “makes sense.”

Karl Bélanger, a long-time NDP insider who was Mulcair’s principal secretary and Jack Layton’s press secretary, said Singh’s team should “use caution” when deliberating about whether to run in an Outremont byelection. Given that the riding was a Liberal stronghold for decades before Mulcair’s breakthrough in 2007, Bélanger said there’s no guarantee that his supporters would transfer their votes to the new NDP leader.

“If there is one thing the NDP leader can’t afford to do right now, it would be to lose in a byelection,” Bélanger said.

Montreal-based pollster Jean-Marc Léger said chatter about Singh running in Outremont is likely in response to Mulcair’s statement Sunday that the leader needs to win a seat. But he said his firm’s recent polling puts the NDP and its leader far behind the Liberals in Québec, and that there would be no safe seats for the party in the province if an election were held today. “He has to be elected somewhere, but I’m pretty sure Québec will not be his first choice,” Léger said.

But Pierre Anctil, a history professor at the University of Ottawa who actually lives in Outremont and specializes in Canadian identity and Québec culture, said it’s far from impossible that Singh could win the riding — even as an anglophone from Ontario.

“I would say, in all of Quebec, his best chances are in a riding that would resemble this,” Anctil said. “I think it’s smart to keep [his options] open.”



https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2018/04/03/jagmeet-singh-could-run-for-election-in-any-riding-including-quebec.html
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 03, 2018 4:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Karl Bélanger is proving to be the voice of reason here;
Outremont isn't an NDP riding, its a Thomas Mulcair riding.

Singh succumbing to the pressure to run in a riding he would almost certainly lose would be a massive hit to his credibility as leader.

It would also highlight the fact that the NDP is in a battle for 4th place in Quebec in a region where around 40% of their caucus is from.

The only way for Outremont to be a win for the NDP is to attract a creditable candidate who is a known commodity within the Province and win or come very close against a strong Liberal, anything short of that serves as a reminder to 15 remaining NDP MPs in the Province that their tenure in Ottawa may rapidly be approaching an end.
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 04, 2018 9:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
Karl Bélanger is proving to be the voice of reason here;
Outremont isn't an NDP riding, its a Thomas Mulcair riding.

Singh succumbing to the pressure to run in a riding he would almost certainly lose would be a massive hit to his credibility as leader.

It would also highlight the fact that the NDP is in a battle for 4th place in Quebec in a region where around 40% of their caucus is from.

The only way for Outremont to be a win for the NDP is to attract a creditable candidate who is a known commodity within the Province and win or come very close against a strong Liberal, anything short of that serves as a reminder to 15 remaining NDP MPs in the Province that their tenure in Ottawa may rapidly be approaching an end.



the only way a singh run in Outremont would make any sense is if the liberals didn't run a candidate as is often the case when a new leader seeks a seat in a safe riding

it would look poorly on the liberals if they tried to beat Singh ( the first non white party leader ) but in the past had simply allowed other leaders such as Joe Clark and Harper a free pass when they needed a seat


although the Outremont liberal association would likely only agree to this if Singh's stay as mp was only temporary and he planned to run somewhere else in 2019 ,
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 11, 2018 3:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jagmeet Singh Seriously Considering Risky Run For Mulcair’s Old Montreal Seat

The NDP has held Outremont since 2007.


By Althia Raj


OTTAWA — Should Jagmeet Singh run for the Monreal seat held by his predecessor Thomas Mulcair? That's a question the current NDP leader says he's still seriously pondering.

"I'm considering all my options," Singh told reporters Wednesday about possibly running in Outremont. He's listening to counsel and is "always open to hearing folks' input on any byelection that opens up."

The NDP has held Outremont since Mulcair won it in a byelection in 2007. Up until 2011, it was the only NDP seat in Quebec.

'There are pros and cons'

Winning a byelection there — Mulcair has announced he's stepping down as MP in June — would boost the NDP's fortunes in the province leading up to the general election in 2019, said the party's Quebec lieutenant Alexandre Boulerice.


"We're juggling with the idea right now. It would be audacious. It would be bold, but still, Outremont, we've won it four times. Last time, we won it with 5,000 votes," he said.

"There are pros and there are cons...The gains would be if we win the gamble, that sends a pretty strong message about the strength of the NDP and the importance of Quebec for Jagmeet Singh," Boulerice added.

"At the same time, it could be seen as bravado and it could be more risky, maybe Mr. Singh would have greater affinity with a an Ontario byelection."


Running in Outremont also carries a lot of risks.

"Mr. Singh [was] a provincial member from Brampton, in Ontario, and has few links to Montreal and few roots with the local community, so it could be difficult," Boulerice acknowledged. "[He] has a lot to learn about Quebec and Montreal society. He is extremely curious, and he learns very quickly, but it's not his home."


Boulerice played down suggestions from a Quebec reporter that Singh's turban — the NDP leader is a devout Sikh — would turn off some of the riding's voters.

"We need to move on from that debate about the wearing of religious symbols," he said, in French. "At some point, there is a difference between appearance and competence and, at the end of the day, the people will judge on competence."

There is some pressure on Singh, who was chosen as NDP leader last October, to take a seat quickly in the House of Commons. Mulcair recently told CTV that he thinks "it's important for a political leader to get in [Parliament] as soon as possible so that Canadians can get to know him."

A recent public spat between Singh and leadership challenger Ontario MP Charlie Angus and Quebec MP Romeo Saganash over a punishment levied on colleague David Christopherson for voting against the party line also spurred calls for the leader to spend more time with his parliamentary caucus.

It's important for the leader to travel across the country and meet with communities, Boulerice said, but also that he spend time on Parliament Hill with MPs, staff and even reporters.

"There is a balance that needs to be found there. Being elected as an MP would force him, obviously, to spend a lot more time in Ottawa."

Former NDP national director Karl Bélanger cautioned a decision about where Singh should run shouldn't be made lightly.

"You cannot run in a byelection you are going to lose," Bélanger, the president of The Douglas-Coldwell Foundation, told HuffPost Canada.


"If they are doing their research and they are looking at all aspects of it, and they think that he will win, they should consider it — however, they shouldn't assume that all the Mulcair votes will transfer to the new leader."

Outremont is a seat that belonged to the Liberals for decades before Mulcair, a former provincial Liberal cabinet minister, won it for the federal NDP, Bélanger noted. "They can't assume it is an NDP seat... One of the reason it went to the NDP was because of Thomas Mulcair's candidacy."

Some Liberals are already organizing in Outremont where a nomination battle has yet to be called. Concordia University political science professor Kimberley Manning is interested in the seat, as is the Grits' 2015 candidate and former staffer Rachel Bendayan.

Bendayan has been pounding the pavement for months and recently boasted of having more than 100 volunteers. The Jewish woman lives with her family in the largely well-to-do riding with a large Jewish community.

Asked about Singh's prospects, the Liberal riding president, David Marshall, suggested the NDP leader has no chance. "I think we're going to win it!", he told HuffPost.

Running in Outremont "would be a very dangerous move," Bélanger said.

"The worst thing that could happen 18 months out of an election is for the leader to run in a byelection and lose," he explained. "If the new leader doesn't win the seat of the old leader, [the argument will be] where else could he win seats?"


https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2018/04/11/jagmeet-singh-mulcair-outremont-2018_a_23409035/
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 11, 2018 4:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:

Asked about Singh's prospects, the Liberal riding president, David Marshall, suggested the NDP leader has no chance. "I think we're going to win it!", he told HuffPost.

Running in Outremont "would be a very dangerous move," Bélanger said.

"The worst thing that could happen 18 months out of an election is for the leader to run in a byelection and lose," he explained. "If the new leader doesn't win the seat of the old leader, [the argument will be] where else could he win seats?"

https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2018/04/11/jagmeet-singh-mulcair-outremont-2018_a_23409035/


It doesn't sound as if the Liberals are planning on making way for Singh in Outremont.

The Liberals could use some depth and experience in certain portfolios and would be well served adding a rockstar in that by-election.
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 11, 2018 6:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
RCO wrote:

Asked about Singh's prospects, the Liberal riding president, David Marshall, suggested the NDP leader has no chance. "I think we're going to win it!", he told HuffPost.

Running in Outremont "would be a very dangerous move," Bélanger said.

"The worst thing that could happen 18 months out of an election is for the leader to run in a byelection and lose," he explained. "If the new leader doesn't win the seat of the old leader, [the argument will be] where else could he win seats?"

https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2018/04/11/jagmeet-singh-mulcair-outremont-2018_a_23409035/


It doesn't sound as if the Liberals are planning on making way for Singh in Outremont.

The Liberals could use some depth and experience in certain portfolios and would be well served adding a rockstar in that by-election.


well at this point the Outremont liberal association is simply preparing for a by election and been no word any star candidates or party leaders plan to run there


but if your the liberals you have to ask your self the question ?

can you actually sell the denial of a seat in parliament to Singh to the general public ?

myself I see the optics as absolutely horrible on the liberals and Trudeau , when you already have a majority and can pass any piece of legislation , what is your case for denying singh a seat in parliament ? other than to case trouble and turmoil in the ndp in the hopes the liberals win more seats in quebec


I'd personally say the majority of the population would have no issue with him being an mp and participating in question period , I'm not sure what there case to deny him that chance would be ?

the optics of denying the first non white party leader a seat in parliament could be truly horrible , well they might be able to win Outremont , they have to ask themselves the question if its worth the optics , which make the liberals appear truly mean and obsessed with being in power at any cost


when the Ontario liberals beat John Tory in a by election , that was much different as he had just lost an election and half the conservatives hated him and didn't even care if he stayed

trying to beat an ndp leader who simply wants a seat in parliament so he can do his job is much different and could risk turning off ndp voters from the liberals in 2019 , if they felt he was treated unfairly when compared to opposition leaders before him
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PostPosted: Thu May 24, 2018 7:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( singh seems to be flirting with the idea of running in a BC by election )


Singh sides with B.C. in hornet's nest of pipeline politics for the NDP

by Mia Rabson, The Canadian Press
Posted May 23, 2018 2:43 pm EDT
Last Updated May 23, 2018 at 6:40 pm EDT



OTTAWA – Jagmeet Singh planted the federal NDP flag firmly on British Columbia’s side of the Trans Mountain dispute Wednesday after months of trying to stay neutral in the bitter feud between his Alberta and B.C. counterparts over energy and environmental policy.

In fact Singh said he hasn’t even had a conversation with Alberta Premier Rachel Notley in months — not since Notley called him and his position on the pipeline “irrelevant” last fall, nor since Notley’s description of him last week as “absolutely, fundamentally, incontrovertibly wrong.”

“We’ve not have a chance to speak yet,” Singh told a news conference after his weekly caucus meeting.

Until recently, Singh had called for a more thorough environmental review process on the proposal to twin an existing pipeline that runs between Edmonton and Burnaby, B.C. He now says he is 100 per cent opposed, since Ottawa wants to put money on the table to cover any cost overruns caused by political interference — largely from a court challenge by the NDP government in B.C.

“This was a very difficult decision for me,” Singh said. “It wasn’t something I took lightly but leaders have to make tough decisions.”

The NDP’s positioning on the pipeline is a political hornet’s nest. B.C. Premier John Horgan campaigned on a promise to oppose the pipeline and his minority government depends on the support of the B.C. Green party, which requires Horgan to continue to oppose it with “every tool available.”

As the premier of a province where the energy industry accounts for about one-quarter of GDP and one-tenth of the jobs, Rachel Notley’s political survival hinges on the pipeline being built.

Federally, the NDP have but one seat in Alberta compared with 14 in B.C. But Singh’s own designs on a House of Commons seat could also be in play: MP Kennedy Stewart is vacating his Burnaby seat later this summer, creating a tantalizing opportunity for a leader who desperately needs to make his presence felt in the House.

Stewart himself told The Canadian Press this week Burnaby is the NDP’s stomping ground, noting all four provincial seats and the entirety of the city council are NDP members. Singh would “have a very good chance of winning here” were a byelection to be held, Stewart said.

He also said after the high cost of housing, the pipeline is the biggest concern in the riding.

Singh denied the suggestion that the byelection had anything to do with his position on the pipeline. He said he hasn’t even decided whether to run there, noting only that he won’t make a decision before discussing it with his team and taking their advice.

His position really changed, he said, because the Liberals now want to force Canadians to shoulder not only the environmental risk, but now the financial risk, of the pipeline “to benefit private shareholders of a corporation in Texas.”

The Liberal government’s financial commitment to Trans Mountain is just another subsidy for the fossil fuel industry, something Prime Minister Justin Trudeau promised to do away with, said Singh, who urged the government to spend its $1.3 billion in grants and tax credits on clean tech instead.

Singh did not take aim at Notley himself Wednesday, instead choosing to praise her for doing what she promised to do to stand up for the people of Alberta. He even called her carbon tax plan the “best climate change plan in the country.”

“If we want to attain our climate change goals, we need a premier like Premier Notley,” he said.

Notley, however, was less gracious.

“The private shareholders that he’s describing happen to be part of a company that will contribute about, I don’t know, roughly $15 billion to the Canadian economy and will contribute to and support over a quarter million jobs in the country of Canada,” she said on CBC’s “Power and Politics.”

“It is a ridiculously naive statement.”

— with files from Lee Berthiaume


http://toronto.citynews.ca/201.....yelection/
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Does Jagmeet Singh need a seat in the house ?

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