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RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2018 9:17 am    Post subject: Senator Beyak removed from cpc caucus Reply with quote

( this senator has been in hot water for some time and it appears Scheer had finally seen enough and decided she wasn't worth the trouble , she is still a member of the senate though and will sit as an independent )


Sen. Lynn Beyak kicked out of Conservative caucus



CTV National News: Beyak kicked from caucus

Senator Lynn Beyak has been removed from the Conservative caucus after posting offensive letters about Indigenous peoples online.
.


The Canadian Press
Published Thursday, January 4, 2018 10:01PM EST
Last Updated Friday, January 5, 2018 7:29AM EST


OTTAWA -- Sen. Lynn Beyak, who famously declared "some good" came out of Canada's residential schools, was removed from the Conservative Party caucus after refusing to remove a "racist" comment from her website, Opposition Leader Andrew Scheer said Thursday.

Scheer said in a statement that he had learned on Tuesday that Beyak had posted approximately 100 letters from Canadians in support of her position on residential schools to her Parliamentary website.

He said the vast majority of letters focused on the history of residential schools, while others contained comments about Indigenous Canadians in general.


The Conservative leader said he had asked Beyak to remove one of the letters that suggested Indigenous People want to get things for "no effort" and she refused, resulting in her removal from caucus.

"Promoting this comment is offensive and unacceptable for a Conservative Parliamentarian. To suggest that Indigenous Canadians are lazy compared to other Canadians, is simply racist," he said.

"As a result of her actions, Conservative Senate Leader Larry Smith and I have removed Sen. Lynn Beyak from the Conservative National Caucus. Racism will not be tolerated in the Conservative caucus or Conservative Party of Canada," Scheer said.

In was in March 2017 that Beyak suggested residential schools were not all bad.

"I speak partly for the record, but mostly in memory of the kindly and well-intentioned men and women and their descendants -- perhaps some of us here in this chamber -- whose remarkable works, good deeds and historical tales in the residential schools go unacknowledged for the most part and are overshadowed by negative reports,' Beyak said.

That led to a chorus of calls for Beyak to step down from the committee.

Indigenous leaders in Manitoba and northern Ontario were unequivocal in calling for Beyak to quit.

"Her unparalleled praise of residential schools and smears of all First Nation leaders is not acceptable," said Sheila North Wilson, a grand chief of an organization representing First Nations in northern Manitoba.

Nishnawbe Aski Nation Grand Chief Alvin Fiddler called Beyak's comments a national insult and unacceptable coming from a member of the Senate.

And, in an open letter to Beyak, the Anglican Church of Canada said that whatever good may have taken place, "the overall view is grim. It is shadowed and dark; it is sad and shameful."

Beyak, who was appointed to the Senate by former prime minister Stephen Harper in 2013, was expelled from the Senate's committee on Aboriginal Peoples about a month later by former party leader Rona Ambrose.

But last September, Beyak issued a letter calling for First Nations people to give up their status cards in exchange for a one-time cash payment and said they could then practise their culture "on their own dime."

Canada's Truth and Reconciliation Commission spent six years examining the legacy of the government-funded, church-operated schools, infamous hotbeds of abuse and mistreatment that operated from the 1870s to 1996.

The result was the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, which was reached after residential school survivors took the federal government and churches to court with the support of the Assembly of First Nations and Inuit organizations.

It was designed to help repair the lasting damage caused by the schools, and -- in addition to compensating survivors -- to explore the truth behind the program.


https://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/sen-lynn-beyak-kicked-out-of-conservative-caucus-1.3746532
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2018 9:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Controversial Ontario Senator Lynn Beyak booted from Conservative caucus



Controversial Conservative Sen. Lynn Beyak has been removed from all Senate committees following remarks about First Nations which have been widely condemned.


By Alex BallingallOttawa Bureau

Thu., Jan. 4, 2018


OTTAWA—After months of controversy and condemnation over her statements on residential schools, Conservative Senator Lynn Beyak was kicked out of the party’s caucus late Thursday night.

Sen. Larry Smith, chief Conservative in the Red Chamber, said in a statement that the move came after consultation with party leader Andrew Scheer.

“We have concluded that Senator Beyak will no longer be a member of our Senate Caucus and, consequently, the National Conservative Party of Canada Caucus,” the statement said.

“As an internal Party issue, I consider (the) matter closed and will have no further comment.”

In his own statement, Scheer said the decision came down to Beyak’s refusal to take down letters of support for her comments on residential schools that she posted on her personal senate website in recent months.



Scheer cited one letter in particular, which said: “‘I’m no anthropologist but it seems every opportunistic culture, subsistence hunter/gatherers seeks to get what they can for no effort. There is always a clash between industrial/organized farming culture that values effort as opposed to a culture that will sit and wait until the government gives them stuff’.”

Scheer said: “To suggest that indigenous Canadians are lazy compared to other Canadians, is simply racist... Racism will not be tolerated in the Conservative Caucus or Conservative Party of Canada.”

Calls for Beyak’s resignation as a senator and removal from the Conservative caucus have been heard on Parliament Hill since March, when she made a speech during a debate about Indigenous women in prison. The speech included references to Canada’s residential schools, a network of institutions for Indigenous children that existed across the country for more than a century and have been condemned by the national Truth and Reconciliation Commission as a tool of “cultural genocide.”


In her speech, Beyak spoke of the “kindly and well-intentioned men and women... whose remarkable works, good deeds and historical tales in the residential schools go unacknowledged for the most part and are overshadowed by negative reports.”

“Obviously, the negative issues must be addressed, but it is unfortunate that they are sometimes magnified and considered more newsworthy than the abundance of good,” Beyak said.

She was quickly condemned by MPs of all stripes, including the then-Indigenous Affairs Minister and the NDP’s Romeo Saganash, who is Cree from Quebec and attended a residential school himself as a child. “It’s like saying, ‘Well, there are some good sides to what Hitler did to the Jewish community’,” he said at the time.

Beyak was soon removed from her post on the senate’s Indigenous affairs committee.

Controversy continued this week, however, when media reports highlighted letters of support that she posted on her website, purportedly to show that other Canadians share her views on residential schools.

Many of the letters are general expressions of support, while others blame the media and politicians for ignoring the supposed truth of Beyak’s statements. Some have also been singled out for blanket statements regarding Indigenous peoples in Canada.

Fellow senator Lillian Dyck, who is a member of Gordon First Nation in Saskatchewan, told CBC on Thursday that the letters are “frankly racist, offensive, hurtful and it was quite shocking to me that anyone would publish something like that on their website.”

At least 150,000 First Nation, Métis and Inuit youth went through the residential schools and an unknown number — estimated to be in the thousands — died.


https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2018/01/04/controversial-ontario-senator-lynn-beyak-booted-from-conservative-caucus.html
Bugs





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PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2018 9:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think this is the final straw for me. I am not going to war with Scheer, but I am convinced he's a dud, and that the party has fallen into the hands of the old Bay Street crowd who have demonstrated their political stupidity for decades.

As I see it ... Stephen Harper was preparing to bring public opinion to bear upon the crooked native chieftains, some of whom make bigger salaries than the PM himself. The whole system of subsidies was going to be posted on websites so that some degree of accountability to the band-members could be established. He had done the same thing with the Senate, and was also lining up the labour unions for some accountability training.

When Mulcair saw that, he began to rumble. In his book, it's racist to take care of the money. And, of course, the NDP got a piece of those crooked dollars. He raged on what is, after all, the chief narrative of the left -- that is, if you are white, you're guilty -- except, of course, for white women, who, after all, have endured white men longer than anybody.

And Justin pip-squeaked up, "Me too."

So, the election passed, the Conservatives lost, and the new boys swept to power. The plan to post the financial information was scrapped and things resumed their corrupt ways, while the Liberal Party looked for their piece.

And the Conservatives were left wondering what went wrong. The guy who ran on continuing the Harper approach, but with a better public relations face, comes out an denounces a senator for telling the (uncomfortable) truth.

The reservation schools plan was an attempt to integrate natives into the emerging industrial economy. In those days, that was what the sober natives wanted. It was the churches that failed it. I don't point fingers. What, after all, is wrong with buggering young native boys if you think homosexuals are the best people in your society? Or at least they're the redeemable part of the male sex?

Scheer did the same thing with the social conservatives. He did the same thing with the French-Canadian vote. And now he's purging senators.

Not much room to discuss both sides of an issue with that guy!

This guy is beginning to make John Tory look like a winner.
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2018 10:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
I think this is the final straw for me. I am not going to war with Scheer, but I am convinced he's a dud, and that the party has fallen into the hands of the old Bay Street crowd who have demonstrated their political stupidity for decades.

As I see it ... Stephen Harper was preparing to bring public opinion to bear upon the crooked native chieftains, some of whom make bigger salaries than the PM himself. The whole system of subsidies was going to be posted on websites so that some degree of accountability to the band-members could be established. He had done the same thing with the Senate, and was also lining up the labour unions for some accountability training.

When Mulcair saw that, he began to rumble. In his book, it's racist to take care of the money. And, of course, the NDP got a piece of those crooked dollars. He raged on what is, after all, the chief narrative of the left -- that is, if you are white, you're guilty -- except, of course, for white women, who, after all, have endured white men longer than anybody.

And Justin pip-squeaked up, "Me too."

So, the election passed, the Conservatives lost, and the new boys swept to power. The plan to post the financial information was scrapped and things resumed their corrupt ways, while the Liberal Party looked for their piece.

And the Conservatives were left wondering what went wrong. The guy who ran on continuing the Harper approach, but with a better public relations face, comes out an denounces a senator for telling the (uncomfortable) truth.

The reservation schools plan was an attempt to integrate natives into the emerging industrial economy. In those days, that was what the sober natives wanted. It was the churches that failed it. I don't point fingers. What, after all, is wrong with buggering young native boys if you think homosexuals are the best people in your society? Or at least they're the redeemable part of the male sex?

Scheer did the same thing with the social conservatives. He did the same thing with the French-Canadian vote. And now he's purging senators.

Not much room to discuss both sides of an issue with that guy!

This guy is beginning to make John Tory look like a winner.


I don't really see what other choice Scheer had ?

either remove her from the caucus or leave her in , knowing full well she might embarrass the party further

think it works best for Beyak and the cpc caucus for her to sit as an independent senator
Bugs





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PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2018 11:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

When the truth embarrasses the party, maybe it's time to re-think things?

How many more people can he kick out of the party and expect it to grow?

Here's what I see is the problem. Scheer pre-judges the Senator as a racist because she is rallying people around a real issue. Yes, perhaps they put it badly with they conceived the project as "taking the Indian out of the child" -- but that is exactly what they were doing. Or, a better way to put it -- taking what was left of tribal culture out of the child destined for a life in the industrial world.

In those days, they were just setting up government education in the white world, and they made school attendance compulsory. To make this possible for native people, they set up the residential school system. They probably saw it as an appropriate way to create opportunities for a marginal people.

What screwed it up was the churches, let's face it. Why are churches beyond reproach?

===============================

What do they mean when they say "take the Indian out of the child?" You have to understand tribal cultures are radically different from industrial cultures. In that world, if you bring some game home, you owe one leg to your mother-in-law, perhaps, and another to your wife -- who you may or may not live with, depending -- and so on, until the carcass is divided up. For men, particularly, being accused of 'selfishness' is condemning. The cultural stress is on sharing.

In a tribal economy, everything is organized through kinship, and it stresses generosity. So when natives get a government cheque, their cultural impluses are to share, not to save and make it last. They don't have 'private property' -- they have clan property or some other form -- usually in the form of a 'hunting ground'.

On top of that, there are cultural traditions that teach people to seek out extreme emotions to find wisdom. For example, in fearsome situations, tribal people feel they should abandon themselves to their fear, and be violent in the extreme. Men were taught to be fearless warriors, and to brag about their victories, often measured in the number of people they had killed.

All of these things were "functional" for tribes and hunters & gatherers. But all of them are exactly antagonistic to the industrial world.

Of course, the tribal societies had deteriorated to the point that their languages disappeared. And when an oral culture's language disappears, so does most of the culture. Wny? Because oral cultures use language the way we use libraries. It's where they store the lore, like what mushrooms you can eat, and which ones have the evil spirit in them. The difference may be almost invisible to a European, but to the natives, the language makes vital distinctions. And when it goes, it is a pretty good marker of the end of that little bit of native culture.

Their bravery and generosity had become poverty and drunkenness. Sorry, it's true.

That's what the Residential Schools were trying to address.

Now, a Senator -- a Senator! -- is being disciplined for trying to bring Truth to these so-called Truth & Reconciliation Commissions, and the Conservative Party of Canada thinks she should be stoned for wrong-think. What do you have to do to be a Senator in Canada? She comes from Kenora -- you think she doesn't have intimate experience with this? How many opioid victims do you need to see at the methadone clinic to wake up?

My opinion: this is something that a free people in a free country having free speech ought to be able to talk about in their legislatures. She has not made any actual slurs, she is only a victim of the media.

It isn't as if Political Correctness isn't racist. Try to talk up the rights of white males at Wilfred Laurier University, and you'll soon see where the racism lies.

And as for the bonehead leading the not-so Conservative Party, he is only pandering with this. He didn't have to do anything. He made headlines by acting like his party is full of racists. He's a stupid asshole, when it comes to politics.

Am I wrong?
Toronto Centre





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PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2018 12:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
My opinion: this is something that a free people in a free country having free speech ought to be able to talk about in their legislatures. She has not made any actual slurs, she is only a victim of the media.


Was she arrested?

Did someone cover her mouth by force when she tried to speak?

Did the media put the words in her mouth? If so , how did they do that?

Is not “‘I’m no anthropologist but it seems every opportunistic culture, subsistence hunter/gatherers seeks to get what they can for no effort. There is always a clash between industrial/organized farming culture that values effort as opposed to a culture that will sit and wait until the government gives them stuff’.” ... this her own words and what idiot says such crap? (oops,,,apart from Beyak and um...er..)

Scheer is right and good for him.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2018 2:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sez the goof that wants him to lose!

Quote:
Backlash as Canada reveals big salaries for aboriginal leaders
Andrea Hopkins
4 MIN READ

TORONTO (Reuters) - A Canadian aboriginal leader was paid nearly C$1 million last year by his community, one of many large compensation packages revealed this week under a new law that has sparked concern about potential corruption among Canada’s often-impoverished natives.

Chief Ron Giesbrecht, who leads a community of some 82 people on Canada’s west coast, was paid C$914,219 ($839,800) in remuneration and C$16,574 in expenses last year, according to a salary disclosure released by the federal government.

The giant pay package is the largest so far in a string of outsized incomes for First Nations chiefs from coast to coast revealed under a new law designed to boost transparency of aboriginal communities, which get the bulk of their income from the Canadian government.

“The reported salary of the Chief is very troubling and his community members deserve an explanation,” Andrea Richer, a spokeswoman for Aboriginal Affairs Minister Bernard Valcourt, said in an email.

“Our government expects First Nation band councils to use taxpayer dollars responsibly and for the benefit of all community members which is why we brought in the First Nation Transparency Act,” she wrote.

As of July 29, Canada’s more than 600 aboriginal communities are required to publish their audited financial statements and pay packages for chiefs and councillors on the Internet, a process that is already grabbing headlines and triggering outrage.

Canada spends around C$11 billion a year on its aboriginal population, but living conditions for many are poor, and some aboriginal reserves have high rates of poverty, addiction, joblessness and suicide.

Giesbrecht, who was elected to a three-year term that began in 2012 and took on an additional role as economic development officer in September 2013, could not immediately be reached for comment.

A statement from the community suggested the high pay will not continue.

“We understand that seeing such a large number for the Chief’s salary is disconcerting, but for the sake of clarity, we wish to break it down for you,” the Kwikwetlem First Nation said in the statement.

It said C$800,000 of the remuneration was a 10 percent bonus linked to an economic development project but noted that the bonus was removed from a new contract for the chief that was negotiated in April.

The Kwikwetlem First Nation, named for the sockeye salmon which run in a nearby river, has two reserves on the outskirts of Vancouver. Thirty-five people live on its reserves, and the rest live elsewhere in Canada ....
https://ca.reuters.com/article/domesticNews/idCAKBN0G14SR20140801
Bugs





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PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2018 2:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

And where do you think the money comes from -- selling moccasins?

Quote:
Ontario completes sale of Hydro One shares to First Nations
Transaction is one of many steps on Ontario's journey of healing and reconciliation with Indigenous peoples, says province
2 days ago by: Village Media
PowerLinesSunset
Stock image
NEWS RELEASE
ONTARIO MINISTRY OF ENERGY
*************************
The Province announces that it has now completed the sale of 14,391,012 common shares of Hydro One Limited, representing approximately 2.4 per cent of the outstanding common shares, to OFN Power Holdings LP, a limited partnership wholly-owned by Ontario First Nations Sovereign Wealth LP, which is in turn owned by 129 First Nations in Ontario at a purchase price of $18 per share for a total purchase price of $259,038,216.

This transaction fulfills the Province's commitment in its agreement-in-principle with the Chiefs-in-Assembly on behalf of the First Nations in Ontario, which was previously announced on July 12, 2016. This transaction demonstrates the goodwill envisioned by the political accord to promote stronger economic relations and is one of many steps on Ontario's journey of healing and reconciliation with Indigenous peoples. It will provide meaningful opportunities to First Nations for collective wealth creation and to advance economic development initiatives.


The purchase is financed through a 25-year term loan from the Province with a principal amount of $259,038,216. The interest rate for the term loan is at the Province's relevant borrowing rate, plus 15 basis points. The shares sold in the transaction have been pledged as security for the term loan provided by the Province. [....]
https://www.baytoday.ca/local-news/ontario-completes-sale-of-hydro-one-shares-to-first-nations-803045


So, we are loaning a bad financial risk a quarter of a $billion to buy our infrastructure from us so we will be paying them forever ... and WE are the racists?

Why can't people in a free country with free speech talk about this? Hmmmm?
Toronto Centre





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PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2018 2:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
Sez the goof that wants him to lose!


Always said I prefer a PC Ontario w A Lib Fed. Aint nothing changed for me.

But ....Patrick Brown. Hmm....better than Wynne but that is a bar set low.

Anyhow, Id love to read how the poster putting up news wire of Hydro One sale and a Chiefs economic windfall has anything to do with Beyak being as dumb as she is?

Oh yea...grasping at straws. I should have known. In other words, you got nothing.
No free speech issue obviously so I am glad by denial of any attempt at that one you agree with me.

Thanks bugs, always can count on you !
Toronto Centre





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PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2018 2:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:


Why can't people in a free country with free speech talk about this? Hmmmm?


Well... You did just speak about this. So, free speech lives !

Yea!

Do you not have any idea that you can and did speak and nothing happened? Or are the voices in your head telling you different?
Bugs





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PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2018 3:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Only if you willing to drummed out of your party ... and be paraded through the media as a racist. Maybe she's just a woman trying to do something about biggest problems in her neighborhood.

Here's a little more on our native landlords ...

The average IQ of North American indigenous people is 85. For the country as a whole, it is 99. This is borne out by repeated studies, and peer reveiw, and all of that. It is now accepted in the psychology profession.

All kinds of liberally-minded people, wedded to the notion that all people are equal, find this conclusion distasteful. Me too, you want to know the truth. But trust me, there has been lots of arguments made in the professional journals, impugning IQ tests as a culture-bound instrument.

So they have worked around this. Now they have tests but ... guess what? IQ is still the best predictor of future success that we have.

Check it out, at http://chartsbin.com/view/39457

What does this mean? Well, if you ranked people by intelligence, and by race, you would find that about 80-85% of white people would be smarter than the average native.

Where it really counts, at the brilliant end, that is IQs over 130, if you had 10,000 random white Canadians, 250 of them register as having IQs over 130; with natives, you would have 15. Whites would outnumber them by better than 10 to 1.

Check it out for yourself at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/68%E2%80%9395%E2%80%9399.7_rule

And we are applying social policy as if these differences didn't exist, but they do. When the designated groups fall short, we attribute those bad results to racism. We call it 'systematic racism' because we don't want people to think changing their racial attitudes will change anything.

It also means your attitudes don't have anything to do with it, but that part is kept hidden. The whole point is to generate racial guilt. It certainly isn't about doing the natives any good.

This is one of those dirty secrets that can get you fired, so keep it to yourself. All races are not equal.

I am not standing up for negligent churches or any of that. I just say that all these rituals of racial guilt which we are being paraded through, at least symbolically -- which end up meanng NOTHING -- are meaningless.

What I say here is fact. I give sources. But we don't have free speech in Canada, and if our pronouns are now under attack it's because we're in the magic thinking of the Left.
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2018 4:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
Only if you willing to drummed out of your party ... and be paraded through the media as a racist. Maybe she's just a woman trying to do something about biggest problems in her neighborhood.


Oh, so in fact you DO have free speech , and so does she.

Got it. Thank you.

But what one does not have is freedom from consequences. Hard to understand but let me try. You say one thing and as a result a consequence occurs .
Yell fire when one does not exist and you get consequences.
Incite someone to do harm to someone else (with words only no less) and you get consequences.

Post that FN's are lazy freeloaders and you get consequences.

Not hard to fathom..... for some.
Quote:

Here's a little more on our native landlords ...

The average IQ of North American indigenous people is 85. For the country as a whole, it is 99. This is borne out by repeated studies, and peer reveiw, and all of that. It is now accepted in the psychology profession.

What is accepted? The numbers ? well ok...but what is not accepted is that some race is born smarter.

Nice try to conflate the two, but your way off base.

The rest of this claptrap is confusing to say the least.

No where does anything mention the equality of opportunity, the education system employed for good or bad, the ability of peoples to get better at life from where they are.

But thats ok. You are not running for Senate .

Ya know, which is something you have going for you. Which is nice.
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2018 5:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the media is now going after the tories , wondering why she wasn't removed sooner ? legitimate question ? I don't know , it seems there just trying to keep the story alive , no one would of even heard of this senator if not for the controversy )


Tories questioned on why they did not boot Beyak from caucus sooner

By Kristy Kirkup. Published on Jan 5, 2018 1:56pm



OTTAWA – The Conservative party is facing questions on why it failed to oust Sen. Lynn Beyak from its caucus sooner, despite repeated calls from Indigenous leaders.

Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer issued a statement late Thursday saying Beyak no longer had a role in the caucus after she posted letters from supporters on her website, including one that said every “opportunistic culture, subsistence hunter/gatherers seeks to get what they can for no effort.”

Scheer called it “racist” to suggest Indigenous Canadians are lazy.

Beyak could not be reached for comment following Scheer’s decision.

Emails to Beyak’s office have gone unanswered and the voicemail box at her Senate office is full.

Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett says the government finds it disappointing that Conservative leadership allowed Beyak to use her position to espouse her “ill-informed and offensive views” of history.

“Although Sen. Beyak has been finally removed from the Conservative caucus, it is more disappointing that her appointment by the Conservatives allows her to continue to use parliamentary resources to validate the views of those who refuse to accept the truth and propagate the misinformation and prejudice that continue to feed racism in our country,” Bennett said in a statement.

Beyak was named to the Senate by former prime minister Stephen Harper.

Last year, Scheer was urged by a number of Indigenous leaders, including Assembly of First Nations National Chief Perry Bellegarde, to remove Beyak from caucus following remarks she made about the legacy of Canada’s residential schools.

“In this era of reconciliation there is no place for the kind of outdated and uninformed thinking expressed by Sen. Lynn Beyak,” Bellegarde said in September.

“She should resign, and if she won’t resign she should be expelled from caucus by the Conservative leader to demonstrate his party’s commitment to truth and reconciliation.”

In March, Beyak told the Senate that government-funded, church-operated schools where Indigenous children endured widespread sexual and physical abuse were not all bad.

“I speak partly for the record, but mostly in memory of the kindly and well-intentioned men and women and their descendants – perhaps some of us here in this chamber – whose remarkable works, good deeds and historical tales in the residential schools go unacknowledged for the most part and are overshadowed by negative reports,” Beyak said.

https://ipolitics.ca/2018/01/05/tories-questioned-not-boot-beyak-caucus-sooner/
Bugs





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PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2018 11:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What has Beyak done? Can anyone specify the charges against her?

Just what has she done, as a representative of her area, that would warrant her being deprived of her party membership? And they aren't satisfied with that -- they want to deprive her of the economic basis of her life.

Or is that not important?

We blather on about 'rights' and we accept this kind of treatment for a Senator? What kind of double-think is this?

I posted some pop-anthropology and some IQ study results, and not even TC would touch it. His issue (apparently) is that she does have free speech after all because she isn't in jail. Maybe it takes parsing 'the words to mini-pixels to get there, but it seems to me that if the economic base of your life is at risk for violating a bureaucrat's sense of propriety, then you don't have freedom of speech. In fact, being fired from a career job is the equivalent of a political murder, at the symbolic level.

And if you're a politician representing people, elected or not, if you aren't allowed to rally people to the issues in your town, then ... what's the point in even holding this electoral circus?

I'm sorry, but Andrew Scheer is nothing but a sissy bureaucrat. The great mainstream of this country does not put a priority on gender issues for instance. They'd like to see some jobs. They shiver in the cold, and they know friggin' well that the world isn't getting warmer.

Paid agents of the state tell our children, in compulsory education institutions, that this is a democracy, etc, but the truth is we aren't represented by the MPs we elect. Those people are (usually) selected from the top, and are put in a 'career system' that keeps them mute, particularly if they have hopes of getting into the cabinet. Let's not deny that a little squeak of public opinion gets in once in a while, but it isn't normal.

And how effective is the legislature, as a body, in controlling the civil service and the government? Not very. Can anybody remember Meech Lake, when the people rose up in righteous anger against an attempt to turn Canada into a province of Quebec? Where were our politicians? Where was Mulroney? He was helping Bourassa put the knife to the throat of English-speaking Canada. (That was the expression being used at the time.)

And now the apparatus of the state wants to roll over us again, actually making sex a matter of choice! Or the great pretence that all races are exactly equal, and any differences in achievement is due to racism! That's all wrong! It's like the equally obtuse notion that men and women are equal. If they're equal, we don't need women's events at the Olympics. Women can do anything men can do, they say, and it's only because oppressive men are afraid to compete against them that we don't see that. Okay, no more special events for women and paraplegics. We'll see.

Men and women are not equal. They are complimentary. But we have to go along with the prevailing pretence, even to the point where boys are under huge pressure to become girls or at least as girl-like as they can manage. (The 'trans' rage that the bureaucrats have induced in the schools is totally phoney -- those are boys being recruited into homosexuality -- cocksuckers in dresses. Encouraged by the system! And any parent speaking out loud about this will be dealt with.)

And the Conservative Party is trying its very best to keep the parents who care from registering their opinions in the political arena! Have you ever seen anything more 1984 than that?

Who knows why? All we know is that it comes from within the school system itself. The bureaucrats and the media pick off the public's representatives for thought-crimes. They are trying to impose an unworkable electoral system on the public with the aim of slowing down the circulation of governments. They borrow and spend on ... what? (This time it was going to be infrastructure -- bridges, sewer maintenance, stuff like that. Do you see the shovels in the ground? Most of what governments spends these days is either transfer payments or wages and salaries. Figure it out.

And what's in the headlines? Conservative Senator raises impermissible issue. And the Conservative Party insiders turn against her!

I am exasperated. There are real issues here, and they are being massively ignored. The rank and file of the party seem to be more interested in the nomination battle in remote ridings than what is screwing up the country. Or in developing an analysis and a rational opposition. Like Preston Manning did.

Right now we are a "me too" opposition. Good luck with that!
Bugs





Joined: 16 Dec 2009
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 09, 2018 9:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I hope people read this column because it reviews us the content of the 'problematic' letters. I'll give you my reaction after you''ve had your own.

Quote:
Christie Blatchford: In the Scheer versus Beyak battle, she got more right than he did
Scheer called her racist, she’s called him a liar, and that, remarkably, is where it sits
Christie Blatchford
January 8, 2018
9:05 PM EST

So as it turns out, there’s a chasm between what Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer says happened and the account of Lynn Beyak, the senator he booted out of the Conservative caucus last week.

In a Jan. 4 statement, Scheer said two days earlier, he learned that Beyak had posted on her website about 100 letters from Canadians in support of her remarks on residential schools, and that some of these contained offensive comments about Indigenous people. He gave one example, which I’ll get to shortly.

But, Scheer also said, “I demanded Senator Beyak remove this content from her website. She refused.” As a result, he said, he and Conservative Senate leader Larry Smith removed her from caucus.

In an internal communication to caucus, which Beyak later made public, Scheer added, “Senator Beyak admitted that she intentionally posted racist correspondence about Indigenous Canadians to her Parliamentary website.”

On Monday, Beyak said flatly all of that was untrue.

“Neither I nor my staff ever spoke with Andrew Scheer or anyone from his office, at any time,” Beyak said in a statement.

Referring to the internal memo that accused her of deliberately posting allegedly racist comments, she said, “That statement is completely false. I would never say or do such a thing.”

Neither side would add a thing to that. Scheer’s spokesman, Jake Enwright, simply referred reporters to Scheer’s original statement and Beyak’s spokesman, Gerald Myall, said only that Beyak “is not answering any questions or giving interviews at this time.”

So, Scheer called her racist, she’s called him a liar, and that, remarkably, is where it sits.

The letter Scheer cited read in part: “I’m no anthropologist, but it seems every opportunistic culture, subsistence hunter/gatherers seeks to get what they can for no effort. There is always a clash between industrial/organized farming culture that values effort as opposed to a culture that will sit and wait until the government gives them stuff.”

Scheer said that promoting “this comment is offensive and unacceptable for a Conservative Parliamentarian. To suggest that indigenous Canadians are lazy compared to other Canadians, is simply racist.”

But that was just a part of the letter, from someone identified as “Paul” on Beyak’s website.

Paul also wrote, immediately after the excerpt Scheer used, this: “Until that happens, it appears they will let everyone around them die. It’s (a) brutal way to live but that’s how it looks to me.

“If you took a bunch of Amish farmers from southern Ontario and banished them to a reserve in Northern Ontario, within a year they would have built all of their members a new home, a new church and barns for every homestead.

“Within a year, they would have dug wells and built a water treatment plant even if it was a simple sand, gravel and charcoal facility.

“Within two years, they would be exporting lumber and furniture to southern Ontario.

“At the same time, the aboriginals relocated to Amish country near Kitchener would have burned down the house and left the fields to gully and rot.”

And before the offending paragraph, Paul wrote this: “From the history I have read, it is likely that the Aboriginals received better treatment and education than society gave the Irish, the Scots, the Polish, the Jews and other minority or out-of-power groups, like the poor…”

One of the points Paul was attempting to make was one that many who wrote Beyak, and whose letters are also posted on her website, also made — that it was a much harsher world then, for everyone, that spare-the-rod-and-spoil-the-child was one of the operating credos of the day, and that it’s unfair to judge solely through the rear-view mirror.

I suspect unlike at least some of those who have commented upon these letters, I’ve read them all.

Only two — the one Scheer cited and another — have received any attention. CBC News seized upon another, which read in part: “I often wonder what problems they (aboriginal communities) would have today if no one learned to read or write … no sports … who would be naïve to think that alcohol, drugs, incest would not have founds its (sic) way into the lives of the North’s children.”

Yet even that letter acknowledged, as did many, that “We both agree that there were many atrocitys (sic) committed at residential schools.”

Much of the mail was written in response to Beyak’s March 7 speech in the Senate last year, in which she acknowledged the mistakes of residential schools — “in many instances, horrible mistakes that overshadowed some good things that also happened at those schools” — rued that none of what governments of both parties have done in the past has worked and wished aloud for a national audit of monies spent on the Indigenous file, and a national referendum of “every single Indigenous person” over 12 “to ask them what they want for their future. Where do they want to live, and what do they want to do?”

As one of the letter writers said, “… isn’t it just possible that reserves are an unreasonable attempt to preserve a way of life that is incompatible with modern expectations?

“For example, one can live a hunting, fishing lifestyle way up north in the wilderness; but can one have such a life and also expect advanced hospitals, education, access to inexpensive food, etc?…Perhaps I am wrong. Perhaps Senator Beyak’s suggestions are not the best solutions.

“But why is it wrong to brainstorm solutions? Why is it wrong to ask hard questions?”

Beyak describes most of those who wrote her as thoughtful and compassionate.

Certainly, she’s more right about the tone of those letters than Scheer was. And in the current he said/she said, that may be telling.
http://nationalpost.com/opinio.....han-he-did


My reaction: this is exactly what a 'representative' in a democracy should do -- bringing the opinions widespread amongst her constituents to the pow-wow, even if they are things that other groups of society are in denial about. It's true, she isn't elected, but shouldn't that be part of the process, regardless?

Scheer is making certain that our elected Conservatives keep those attitudes out of the discussion. He's stiflling political realism.

I wonder -- do these letters express real bigotry? Or are they valid observations of behaviour? Do we really think that we can arrive at decent 'solutions' to social problems by ignoring unpleasant -- but possibly realistic -- aspects of such problems? Or is all a matter of displaying more approved attitudes at the dinner party in Rosedale?

We all know the answers to that question -- everybody but our Andrew. He apparently thinks he sits at the head of a command-and-control hierarchy that can dictate attitudes and expect his orders to be obeyed. He can honour the denial, and project it at a national scale. Is that what the Conservative Party has become?

A political party is not a command-and-control hierarchy. Instead, it is a negotiated regime where all the interests flow through a process that prioritizes agenda items and makes bargains. It's a play of electoral power, in the end.

The problem is when a party becomes a government, it needs to discipline its members. But I wonder if Scheer has noticed. He is not the head of the party in power, and he's getting further and further away from it. The point is that the decision-making apparatus of a nation state is stronger if it takes all these attitudes into account, not just the ones that the chi-chi North Toronto crowd think are "appropriate". Why? Because they are remote from where the wealth is created, they don't know the factors unless this happens.

This is another major goof by the winner on the 13th ballot ...
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Senator Beyak removed from cpc caucus

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