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RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 2017 5:16 pm    Post subject: Does Jagmeet Singh need a seat in the house ? Reply with quote

( an interesting article from Jamie Watts on the issue of ndp leader Jagmeet Singh not currently having a seat in parliament , I agree its not necessary but at the same time if he found one before the next election he wouldn't have to waste time during 2019 election winning one , a run in a tough 905 riding like Brampton could take up much of his time and prevent him from being as effective as possible that election )





Singh does not need a seat in Commons: Watt


The federal NDP Leader can be more effective over the next two years travelling the country than sitting in the Commons.



NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh can afford to wait till the next election to run for a seat in the Commons. (Fred Chartrand / THE CANADIAN PRESS)




By Jaime Watt

Sun., Nov. 19, 2017



New NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh does not need a seat in the House of Commons.

There was a time when the Commons was both the symbolic and functional home of Canadian politics, but it matters less today than it ever has before.

These days, proposed legislation is introduced at photo-ops that are both televised and streamed and instantly made available on voters’ social media accounts.

In Ottawa and in the provinces, legislatures have become home to drive-by smears and gotcha politics; places where the behaviour of members, on each sitting day, diminishes respect for both the institutions and the members themselves.

Singh has been leader of the New Democratic Party since Oct. 1. Since then, he has not indicated any plans to run for a seat in Parliament before the next federal election, which won’t take place for another two years.


You may ask whether this is a good strategy for a new, relatively unknown leader who needs to introduce himself to Canadians, become relevant and make a substantive policy impact.

In fact, staying out of the House of Commons will help.

Former NDP Leader Thomas Mulcair was lauded as an excellent orator and the most prosecutorial and effective opposition leader in Parliament in a generation.



In the end, this had very little effect on the 2015 election results because the political arena has effectively moved outside of traditional, official legislative settings.

The election of U.S. President Donald Trump is emblematic of this. Unlike former presidential hopefuls, Trump garnered support on Twitter, at town hall meetings that resembled rock concerts, and, of course, on the cable news circuit.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, too, has perfected the art of playing politics outside of the House of Commons.

Rather than showing up for Question Period, Trudeau answers questions on the shores of the Gaspé, greets factory workers in London or meets everyday Canadians at an event on Vancouver Island. The Prime Minister and his team know well that these opportunities appeal to his base and network of millennial voters.

In a competitive media landscape, the suppertime news matters less today than ever, and the 30-second news clip from Question Period buried in that newscast has little significance.

Selfie opportunities, viral moments and authentic human experiences are more captivating and better suited for a generation that is increasingly distracted and uninterested in the everyday workings of government.

Trudeau’s tears over Gord Downie’s death, his photobombing weddings, and his wearing silly socks to meetings with world leaders appeal to his voters and also attract the attention of others.

Singh knows this kind of thing works. That’s why he doesn’t want to be tied down by having a seat in the House of Commons.

Singh can travel the country on his time and by his own rules. This opens the door to more fundraising and important time with regional media outlets. And he’ll have time to focus energy on attracting star candidates to improve the NDP’s odds in 2019.

In that campaign, Singh will find himself fighting two very organized opponents. Both the Liberals and the Conservatives have a vast network of disciplined volunteers, fundraisers and strategists. The NDP ground game is far behind. To succeed, Singh will need to spend time diligently strengthening this capacity.

And he will need money. Lots and lots of money. Much of the money he raised during his leadership campaign came from the 905 area around Toronto. But a federal election campaign is very different from a leadership contest and to be successful, Singh will have to raise money from all corners of our country.

And there’s one more crucial thing to consider: there are risks to Singh running in any of the by-elections next month to fill four vacant House of Commons seats. Only one — in Scarborough-Agincourt — is in Ontario, Singh’s home province, and a riding where he spent his formative years. The seat was left vacant by the death of Liberal MP Arnold Chan, whose wife, Jean Yip, is now the Liberal candidate and favoured to win.

If Singh were to run in a byelection and lose, his party’s chances in 2019 would be materially compromised.

It’s becoming increasingly apparent that the risks of running are far greater than the rewards.

Jaime Watt is the executive chairman of Navigator Ltd. and a Conservative strategist

https://www.thestar.com/opinion/star-columnists/2017/11/19/singh-does-not-need-a-seat-in-commons-watt.html
Bugs





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PostPosted: Fri Dec 22, 2017 1:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah, he probably does. He is having a worse launch than Scheer!
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 22, 2017 5:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

He is the leader of the second opposition party in the middle of a majority government mandate.

The opposition is largely window dressing in the Commons.

The focus for him needs to be fundraising, its needs to be a strategy, and more than anything he needs to give that party some direction.

The NDP faithful decided that the second largest caucus in their history was grounds to remove Mulcair.

Then those same party members decided that rather than select a leader from the two regions that gave them the largest pieces of their caucus (Quebec and BC) they opted for a charismatic guy from Ontario (where they hold 8/121 seats) who happens to be from a region in Ontario (Western GTA) where the NDP is 0/14 with the best finish being a third place with 23.01% of the vote.

Singh has far bigger problems than his lack of a seat in the Commons.

They are polling in 4th in Quebec, by some estimations closer to 5th and the GPC than 3rd and the CPC. (A region responsible for 36% of their sitting caucus)

They have no money

They have not shown any significant growth in any by-election in any region thus far to show any potential growth to make up for the likely losses in Quebec

They are about to lose what was one of the safest NDP seats in Canada (Outremont)

The Liberals have filled the vacuum that the NDP once filled, they are largely irreverent politically till they at least make an attempt to claw back even a fraction of the support they had under Mulcair and Layton
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 23, 2017 11:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think you are over-extending yourself about Outremont. Before Mulcair, it was securely Liberal, was it not?
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 24, 2017 10:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
I think you are over-extending yourself about Outremont. Before Mulcair, it was securely Liberal, was it not?



Outremont had always been liberal before Mulcair won other than 1 pc victory in the 80's . so I don't know if there are a lot in the ndp camp overly optimistic about there chances of keeping this riding in the by election or 2019 election


although its possible Jagmeet could win the riding

one possibility is liberals give him a free pass , since he's a new opposition leader and they wait till 2019 when he likely runs in Brampton to take a serious run at the seat

its also possible he wins even if there is a liberal challenger , being he's a new opposition leader , he might be able to get enough of Mulcair's former voters to back him and give him a seat in parliament , on the basis the opposition needs a voice in parliament and trudeau doesn't really need an even bigger majority

but if Jagmeet sits the by election out its more difficult to envision a scenario where the ndp hold the riding , unless they find a star candidate somehow ?
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 24, 2017 10:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I doubt if he will get a free pass. Ever since Adscam, Quebec has been looking for a federal party to support. For a long time, it was the BQ, but they have eliminated themselves over time. Then it was the NDP. Now, it's apparent that the labour union socialism isn't their thing.

The Liberals want to restore their fiefdom in Quebec. For them, it is a return to stable, eternal Liberal government, and that's a good thing. And grabbing Outremont is as good a way as any to illustrate to the Quebec public that now they have no choice.

They will do everything to win in Outremont.
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 27, 2017 10:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
I think you are over-extending yourself about Outremont. Before Mulcair, it was securely Liberal, was it not?


It was, however since then its been firmly Mulcair.
Going from memory its the 3rd or 4th largest percentage of the popular vote they won in the last election.

Losing Mulcair meant losing Outremont and on a larger scale most of Quebec.
That is all on the NDP
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Jan 09, 2018 9:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( according to this article singh is only willing to run in southern Ontario and only in a riding he has a genuine connection to , which seems to be Brampton , Toronto or Windsor . he seems to have ruled out running in Outremont even if it becomes open before 2019 )


Analysis
No seat likely to come Jagmeet Singh's way before 2019 unless one is offered to him

NDP leader says he'd run in Ontario if opportunity arises, but openings look unlikely

By Éric Grenier, CBC News Posted: Jan 09, 2018 5:00 AM ET| Last Updated: Jan 09, 2018 5:00 AM ET

NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh says he wants a 'genuine connection' with a riding before he'd consider running in it for a seat in the House of Commons.


NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh has made it clear he is comfortable not running for a seat in the House of Commons before the 2019 federal election. But he has opened the door to running in a byelection in a riding in which he has a "genuine connection" and which "makes sense."

Singh has laid out the criteria. So where could he run in 2018 if the opportunity presents itself — and where could he win?


In an interview with CBC Radio's The House, Singh told host Chris Hall, "I'm comfortable where I am right now and I'm open, though, to an opportunity that arises that I have a genuine connection to that makes sense."

Asked to define what that means, Singh identified three parts of the country, all in southern Ontario.

"An area that I have some history with, an area that I can connect with constituents," he said. "I've represented Brampton, Mississauga for a number of years. Downtown Toronto is an area that I have a strong connection to. Windsor, also, I have a strong connection, having lived in Windsor for a number of years."

In each of these regions, there are seats that are potentially winnable for Singh and the NDP. But there are also a few obstacles that might force him to wait.

With NDP support stagnant and the party posting losses in all six of the byelections that have occurred during Singh's short tenure, whether he can afford to wait is an open question.

Connection to Brampton

Singh was first elected for the Ontario NDP in the riding of Bramalea–Gore–Malton, a riding straddling parts of both Brampton and Mississauga, in the 2011 provincial election. The bulk of that riding is contained within the federal boundaries of Brampton East, the seat that Singh has identified as the one he will most likely contest in 2019.

Defeating incumbent Liberal MP Raj Grewal will not be easy. Grewal won by a margin of more than 29 percentage points over both the Conservative and NDP candidates.

But Singh has shown he can beat daunting odds. The New Democrats had just 12 per cent support in the 2007 provincial election in Bramalea–Gore–Malton. Singh boosted that score to 38 per cent four years later and 44 per cent in 2014.


This suggests that a low score for the NDP in a previous election might not be an insurmountable obstacle for Singh in Brampton. But Brampton East might be his best hope for a victory. In addition to his history in the riding, it was the one with the highest NDP support in Brampton in 2015 and the only one in which the NDP was even somewhat competitive.

The question is, however, whether he might get the opportunity to demonstrate his local connections in a byelection in 2018. The Liberals hold all five Brampton seats and all six seats in Mississauga (where the NDP's chances look even slimmer, as they lost all six by 39 points or more in 2015).

The five Brampton Liberal MPs are all in their first term. Barring health issues, scandal or tragedy, none of their seats are likely to become available before the next federal election.

Options, but few opportunities

While Singh might not have the same ties to downtown Toronto as Brampton, his party has stronger roots there.

The NDP won eight seats in Toronto in 2011 before being swept out of the city in 2015. But they did finish second in nine ridings, including three in which the margin was less than three points (Davenport, Parkdale–High Park and Toronto–Danforth). If any of these became available, it would meet Singh's criteria of "making sense" — i.e., being winnable.


A number of ridings in the city have a history of voting for the New Democrats and will be battlegrounds in 2019 as the Liberals attempt to maintain their monopoly on the city.

But that means these seats run into the same problem as those in Brampton. They are filled by first-term Liberal MPs, including a few parliamentary secretaries and the ministers for immigration, refugees and citizenship, foreign affairs and finance. They are unlikely to oblige the NDP leader with a vacancy.

Windsor makes sense but it's taken

So if Liberals in Brampton, Mississauga and Toronto won't be making way for Singh, that leaves the last city to which the NDP leader says he has a genuine connection: Windsor.

A hub of the automotive industry, Windsor has long been an NDP stronghold and is where Singh grew up. It was one of the few regions of the country in which the NDP gained seats in the last election, sweeping both urban ridings as well as the neighbouring and more rural Essex seat.


■NDP leader Jagmeet Singh eyes Brampton-East but 'open' to running in Windsor-Essex


But that these three ridings are held by the NDP would seem to rule them out as byelection options for Singh.

"I'm not going to be asking anyone to step down and to disrupt their connection with their community," Singh told The House.

Such a demand would be especially hard to make of the Windsor area's two first-term NDP MPs, Cheryl Hardcastle in Windsor–Tecumseh and Tracey Ramsey in Essex.

Jagmeet Singh, Windsor
Singh, second from left, with Windsor-area MPs Cheryl Hardcastle, second from right, and Brian Masse, right. (Chris Ensign/Twitter)

Brian Masse, however, has held Windsor West for almost 16 years, having won the seat in a 2002 byelection. With a margin of 26 points and more than 12,000 votes over the Liberal candidate in 2015, Masse's seat is one of the three safest NDP ridings in the country.

Singh's Brampton connection can make him a winner there and the NDP is still competitive in Toronto, but in neither city are seats likely to become available. Windsor is both friendly territory for the NDP and has a connection to Singh, but he won't ask his incumbents to step aside.

The next election is just 21 months away — a blip in a veteran parliamentarian's political career. But they might be decisive ones in Singh's leadership of the NDP. Unless someone voluntarily makes room for him, he will likely spend the next 21 months outside the House of Commons, whether he is comfortable with that or not.


http://www.cbc.ca/news/politic.....-1.4477621
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Jan 09, 2018 10:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

that article would seem to indicate his path into the house is very narrow , at least in my view . he seems ok with running in Brampton East , Windsor and downtown Toronto which I'm assuming would be a riding like Toronto Danforth or Parkdale High Park that had been ndp before trudeau

but there is also some odd places missing from his short list of places to run .

first off Hamilton Ontario ? why is that not included , it still mostly votes ndp . he also had a lot of support from Ontario ndp leader Andrea Horwath who is from Hamilton . is a couple ridings held by the liberals that had been ndp and an older ndp mp likely nearing retirement

secondly BC ? seems odd he wouldn't consider running in BC , is a lot of ndp history , a provincial ndp government and still a fair number of ndp mp's


thirdly some other ndp strongholds held by the liberals or conservatives across the country , places like Halifax NS , St Johns East , Winnipeg Centre , as leader he could pretty much get the ndp nomination in any open riding he wanted
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 09, 2018 10:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This suggests to me that the NDP has a leader that can only imagine winning in riding with oodles of former residents of the subcontinent of India.

Sad.
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 09, 2018 11:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Its easy from a Partisan perspective to thumb a nose at Singh for not being willing to seek a seat in any riding that becomes available.

However running and losing would be so incredibly detrimental to the party.
They are having enough of a hard time fundraising as it is and they have a Quebec caucus that I would imagine is incredibly nervous a potential wipe out in the next election that a loss like that would derail any progress that the party had made under Singh.

The NDP isn't the Tories or Liberals who have a respectable amount of "safe" regions, for him to be elected he needs to be somewhere that works for him, and if Brampton, Toronto, and Windsor are those areas, cool.

The importance of the seat is overstated.

With the exception of a brief period from November 2015 to June 2015 the BQ hasn't had a leader with a seat in the Commons from May 2nd 2011 till today. The current leader is sitting as an MNA in a different branch of Government for goodness sake.
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 09, 2018 2:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
Its easy from a Partisan perspective to thumb a nose at Singh for not being willing to seek a seat in any riding that becomes available.

However running and losing would be so incredibly detrimental to the party.
They are having enough of a hard time fundraising as it is and they have a Quebec caucus that I would imagine is incredibly nervous a potential wipe out in the next election that a loss like that would derail any progress that the party had made under Singh.

The NDP isn't the Tories or Liberals who have a respectable amount of "safe" regions, for him to be elected he needs to be somewhere that works for him, and if Brampton, Toronto, and Windsor are those areas, cool.

The importance of the seat is overstated.

With the exception of a brief period from November 2015 to June 2015 the BQ hasn't had a leader with a seat in the Commons from May 2nd 2011 till today. The current leader is sitting as an MNA in a different branch of Government for goodness sake.



still there'd be a huge advantage to the ndp campaign in 2019 if Singh was already in a safe ndp riding and didn't have to worry about campaigning for a seat .

the next election will also be much shorter than 2015 , so there isn't as much time to campaign , if he has to spend 5 or 6 days campaigning in Brampton , then he's down to 30 possible days nationwide , which is less than 30 when you minus a couple days for debates and such


I'm surprised by how narrow his pathway into the house of commons has become , only willing to consider Brampton , Windsor and a few Toronto ridings , even though as ndp leader he could run anywhere


I personally have a hard time believing an ndp leader could ever lose in some of there historical ridings , like Vancouver East or Winnipeg centre as examples , they hold all or most of the provincial ridings in these places . if Singh ran in one of these ridings with all the resources a party leader have plus the ridings ndp leanings , I just don't see how he could lose ? but he seems unwilling to try and win one
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 09, 2018 4:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would accept Cosmo's argument if Singh were more active out on the stumps, or getting himself into the headlines at least occasionally. But he seems to be rivalling our Andrew in his energy level.

It's said that the first victims of party propaganda are the party members themselves. It's possible that the NDP actually believes all the hateful things they espouse about Canada as a hotspot of racism and sexism. (Andrew obviously accepts that.)

I suspect they're afraid to risk a safe seat on a guy so exotically foreign.

It's actually another historical opportunity for the NDP since the Conservatives have quit competing for power.

It's an aside, but you will notice how Oprah has entered the fray on a wave of resentment and sentimentalized hate based on sex and race.

The PC culture has made it impossible to confront these issues from the right unless you are very smart and on top of your game, as well as have a vocabulary and a narrative that allows it.

It's the way left politics is played in our time -- and the trend is towards more of it. It's gone fron Obama, running on the vote-for-me-I'm-black platform to Hillary, and her vote-for-me-I-am-a-woman (hear me roar) to a glimpse of the next chapter -- Oprah as her vote-for-me-because-I-am-black- and-a-woman, and the rest of it doesn't matter.

Platforms don't matter, on the left. Who even remembers Obama's platform position on anything? Or Hillary either. Remember how they gave Obama a Nobel Peace Prize two months into his reign? And he turned out to get involved in a lot of wars, usually for the benefit of Moslems. Nobody cared, or dared even mention it.

Left politics in Canada is an American-made product. We already have affirmative action, and all of that crap. So it's coming here, less the celebrity.

We already have Justin, who is so submissive that I worry lest Trump grab him by the pussy ... you couldn't be more woman-friendly than him, he's a total pushover, even though he 'presents' as a male. But he's a white male, albeit a poor example of the type, devoid of any of the socially constructed masculinity of the past. But still ... white and superficially male. It's not good, even if you're pretty ...

Jagmeet ought to be the leading candidate to take him down. If he's been smart, he's already built a reputation as a well-known feminist! Still, it's not enough, and a Sikh feminist is a hard sell.

But he's got race going for him in spades! He could easily go out and "troll" white crowds and curry a "racist" reaction. No matter how bogus, he would make headlines as yet another victim of white males. It's enough for the white girls, who have no loyalty to the trib, and when it comes to hate -- well, let's say they're well-stocked. He could be positioned to capitalize. TC would swoon.

But I should repress myself here. I won't talk about Andrew. The point is that PC culture has raised the issues we can't talk about to paramount importance. And in that case, Jagmeet is way better positioned than our Andrew ...

Why isn't he out there, on the rubber-chicken circuit in places like Saskatoon and Thunder Bay? If he doesn't have a seat in the House, he ought to be out in the vinyards, preparing for a harvest of votes in 2019.


Last edited by Bugs on Tue Jan 09, 2018 5:10 pm; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 09, 2018 4:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:

still there'd be a huge advantage to the ndp campaign in 2019 if Singh was already in a safe ndp riding and didn't have to worry about campaigning for a seat.


If Brian Masse stepped aside tomorrow, I am pretty confident that Singh would win Windsor West. The question really becomes why bother?

I would imagine he would end up running in Brampton East in the next Federal Election. Much like Joe Clark getting a seat in Kings—Hants and then in the election running in Calgary Centre.

The goal is the exercise should be to add a seat the NDP didn't have, not to shelter its leaders in a seat they would have secured anyway.

RCO wrote:
the next election will also be much shorter than 2015 , so there isn't as much time to campaign , if he has to spend 5 or 6 days campaigning in Brampton , then he's down to 30 possible days nationwide , which is less than 30 when you minus a couple days for debates and such


I also don't think Singh will need to set foot in Brampton East to be elected the MP.

RCO wrote:
I'm surprised by how narrow his pathway into the house of commons has become , only willing to consider Brampton , Windsor and a few Toronto ridings , even though as ndp leader he could run anywhere

I personally have a hard time believing an ndp leader could ever lose in some of there historical ridings , like Vancouver East or Winnipeg centre as examples , they hold all or most of the provincial ridings in these places . if Singh ran in one of these ridings with all the resources a party leader have plus the ridings ndp leanings , I just don't see how he could lose ? but he seems unwilling to try and win one


Leaders historically run in the riding they are from or at a minimum the region they are from.

Singh is a leader from Ontario, running in Ontario is logical.
It wouldn't consider it narrow as much as I would consider it logical.

Why run in a riding today that you won't contest in the next election?

Call me a pessimist, but from the NDPs perspective I don't see the benefit to anyone other than the Liberals to having him in the Commons.

Right now he is fundraising in the same seven day a week manner that Patrick Brown was when he was paying down the debt of the PC party

There is also no benefit to having him available to opposition and Government MPs during question period. Let him snipe from abroad.

It may seem like the cowards way out but you can't contest an election effectively without money and at the moment he is far more effective doing what he is doing than being an absent vote in the Commons.
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 09, 2018 5:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
RCO wrote:

still there'd be a huge advantage to the ndp campaign in 2019 if Singh was already in a safe ndp riding and didn't have to worry about campaigning for a seat.


If Brian Masse stepped aside tomorrow, I am pretty confident that Singh would win Windsor West. The question really becomes why bother?

I would imagine he would end up running in Brampton East in the next Federal Election. Much like Joe Clark getting a seat in Kings—Hants and then in the election running in Calgary Centre.

The goal is the exercise should be to add a seat the NDP didn't have, not to shelter its leaders in a seat they would have secured anyway.

RCO wrote:
the next election will also be much shorter than 2015 , so there isn't as much time to campaign , if he has to spend 5 or 6 days campaigning in Brampton , then he's down to 30 possible days nationwide , which is less than 30 when you minus a couple days for debates and such


I also don't think Singh will need to set foot in Brampton East to be elected the MP.

RCO wrote:
I'm surprised by how narrow his pathway into the house of commons has become , only willing to consider Brampton , Windsor and a few Toronto ridings , even though as ndp leader he could run anywhere

I personally have a hard time believing an ndp leader could ever lose in some of there historical ridings , like Vancouver East or Winnipeg centre as examples , they hold all or most of the provincial ridings in these places . if Singh ran in one of these ridings with all the resources a party leader have plus the ridings ndp leanings , I just don't see how he could lose ? but he seems unwilling to try and win one


Leaders historically run in the riding they are from or at a minimum the region they are from.

Singh is a leader from Ontario, running in Ontario is logical.
It wouldn't consider it narrow as much as I would consider it logical.

Why run in a riding today that you won't contest in the next election?

Call me a pessimist, but from the NDPs perspective I don't see the benefit to anyone other than the Liberals to having him in the Commons.

Right now he is fundraising in the same seven day a week manner that Patrick Brown was when he was paying down the debt of the PC party

There is also no benefit to having him available to opposition and Government MPs during question period. Let him snipe from abroad.

It may seem like the cowards way out but you can't contest an election effectively without money and at the moment he is far more effective doing what he is doing than being an absent vote in the Commons.


I agree that singh could win Windsor West but Brian Masse hasn't ever indicated he plans to retire , he was elected some time ago but isn't that old

but its weird Singh made a weird trip to Windsor in the middle of the last by elections , instead of campaigning in them he went to Windsor , you'd really have to wonder why ( why would he campaign there instead of the by elections ? ) ? was he trying to feel out the city ? in advance of a possible run


he did win Bramalea gore Malton twice provincially , he was the first ndp candidate ever elected in Peel region . obviously he has a better chance at getting elected federally than any other ndp candidate has ever had .

but still I don't know if its a guarantee , the liberals have done well in Brampton federally since 1993 ( only year they didn't sweep the city was 2011 ) and the cpc does well there to . the liberal mp will be campaigning none stop all 36 days to try and save his job , singh isn't going to be there much and that puts him at a disadvantage

if his goal politically was to be a so called "constituency mp" for Brampton , he might of been best to have stayed as mpp provincially , as being a national party leader isn't about being a local mp , they hardly set foot in there own ridings
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Does Jagmeet Singh need a seat in the house ?

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