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RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Dec 14, 2017 9:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It’s Never Fun to Lose a Senate Seat, But the GOP Dodged a Bullet


by Jim Geraghty December 12, 2017 10:59 PM @jimgeraghty

The populists are indeed miracle workers, they’ve managed to elect a Democrat in Alabama. Roy Moore may very well have been the worst Senate nominee for any major party in American history. Even if you dismissed the allegations of him sexually pursuing teenagers in his 30s – and there was no compelling reason to believe Moore’s shifting denials –he managed to create appalling new controversies in almost every appearance.

He completely avoided the campaign trail in the final days, because he could not be trusted to speak to the public.

Despite the frustration of a 52-seat majority becoming a 51-seat majority, tonight’s result is in fact, a long-term victory for the Republican Party. Had Moore gone to the Senate, he would have faced a Senate Ethics Committee investigation. Had that investigation brought back anything less than a full exoneration, GOP senators would have faced the decision of whether to expel him.

As is, Moore could be counted on to create new controversies every time he faced the cameras; every Republican would constantly be asked if they agreed with their fellow senator’s controversial contentions about “reds and yellows,” unnecessary Constitutional Amendments, the wisdom of Vladimir Putin, or whether America was the focus of evil in the modern world.

There is no reason for any Republican to listen to Steve Bannon on any candidate selection ever again. You know who looks pretty smart tonight? Cory Gardner and the National Republican Senatorial Committee who understood that Roy Moore was politically toxic, even in Alabama.

“Tonight’s results are clear – the people of Alabama deemed Roy Moore unfit to serve in the U.S. Senate,” said NRSC Chairman Cory Gardner. “I hope Senator-elect Doug Jones will do the right thing and truly represent Alabama by choosing to vote with the Senate Republican Majority.”

Finally, I guess this means Al Franken has to go ahead with his resignation, huh? Read more at:

http://www.nationalreview.com/.....res-defeat
Bugs





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PostPosted: Thu Dec 14, 2017 10:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

News coverage? Poll results? As I see it, there's no way this is not a referendum of sorts on the Trump plan. Alabamans collectively decided that they'd rather risk control of the Senate than go with Moore. No doubt, the way that Moore handled the Hannity interview played a big role too.

But perhaps this is a dodged bullet, too. The Dems were setting up to make the Moore and the Republicans the poster-boys for sexual inappropriateness. That's an experience in ugliness that I know I can do without.

(How did it get to this point -- where you have to make sure your pronouns are acceptable to c*cks*ckers in dresses, while others are ruined on the basis of 40-year-old rumours?)

This is a setback if only because it will change the arithmetic in the Senate, and encourage the Democrats along the same destructive path they are on. Trump is checked, at least figuratively. It's a big event as far as the optics go.
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Dec 14, 2017 10:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
News coverage? Poll results? As I see it, there's no way this is not a referendum of sorts on the Trump plan. Alabamans collectively decided that they'd rather risk control of the Senate than go with Moore. No doubt, the way that Moore handled the Hannity interview played a big role too.

But perhaps this is a dodged bullet, too. The Dems were setting up to make the Moore and the Republicans the poster-boys for sexual inappropriateness. That's an experience in ugliness that I know I can do without.

(How did it get to this point -- where you have to make sure your pronouns are acceptable to c*cks*ckers in dresses, while others are ruined on the basis of 40-year-old rumours?)

This is a setback if only because it will change the arithmetic in the Senate, and encourage the Democrats along the same destructive path they are on. Trump is checked, at least figuratively. It's a big event as far as the optics go.



there seems to be a lot of lessons from this senate election , the obvious reason for the loss appears to be the allegations moore faced from the various of women .

although when digging deeper there seems to be several other reasons

first off - liberals increasingly have access to more money than in the past , jones outspent moore 10 -1 , which is hard to believe , surely he had outside money from rich liberals in other states . but this increasingly is a trend and we've seen it happen in Ontario too , where these well funded Union groups pop up and suddenly have millions to spend smearing conservative candidates

secondly - religious social conservatism is becoming increasing toxic at the ballot box , it sells at the nomination meeting stage but come the general election it doesn't anymore . if it didn't sell in a place like Alabama , it surely wouldn't sell in more mainstream constituencies , that being said a candidate can still have there own religious views but needs to be careful how they sell them to the general public

thirdly - parties need to do better research into candidates past history , well it may not be possible to know everything about them . or else these sort of sexual harassment scandals mid election could start to become the norm , another option is to force candidates to sign agreements that if there accused of anything , they must suspend campaign until the matter is investigated and its determined if there credible or not ( although some parties may already do this I don't know )

last off - conservatives can't only hope to win with only white voters , a big factor in moores defeat was his extreme unpopularity among the black community . they need to find a way to expand the base and reach out to some other demographic groups like Asians and south Asians as examples


in the end it seems that Moore was such a toxic candidate his candidacy was doomed from the start , people just didn't realise it was and assumed he's win Alabama cause of its past republican history but he was such a horrible candidate he ended up losing . but in the long run I agree the republicans are better off without him , he surely would of hurt there brand and likely been involved in more controversies as a senator
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Thu Dec 14, 2017 1:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Moore simply becomes 2017's Richard Mourdock.

You opted for a candidate of "principal" over a Luther Strange and ended up with a Democrat. This same story played out for GOP several times over the last few elections.

The benefit is the mistake was made today and hopefully will be a lesson not to repeat this same mistake in Primaries for Indiana, Missouri, or Montana a year from now.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Fri Dec 15, 2017 12:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This was being interfered with from the start. McConnell wanted Strange over someone named Mo Brooks. McConnell used Strange to head off Brooks, but then Moore beat Strange. Both sides have their justifications, but Strange was caught in some dubious practices -- he is accused of letting a former Governor off the hook on some offense in order to be appointed to the Senate.

Some say that Moore is a segregationist, and a follower of Wallace. I don't know, but it that was a charge used in the campaign, it worked because Black folks came out heavy for the Democrats. Remember the commercial? It worked.
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Dec 15, 2017 9:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
This was being interfered with from the start. McConnell wanted Strange over someone named Mo Brooks. McConnell used Strange to head off Brooks, but then Moore beat Strange. Both sides have their justifications, but Strange was caught in some dubious practices -- he is accused of letting a former Governor off the hook on some offense in order to be appointed to the Senate.

Some say that Moore is a segregationist, and a follower of Wallace. I don't know, but it that was a charge used in the campaign, it worked because Black folks came out heavy for the Democrats. Remember the commercial? It worked.



Perhaps that explains some of Moore's appeal at the primary stage , he was the candidate Washington didn't want and to some voters there was appeal in that fact .

although there seems to be genuine reasons why the republicans were deeply concerned about having someone like him join there senate caucus , the republican voters just didn't see it that way until maybe it was too late and he had lost the seat to Jones

whats interesting though is that trump got 1,318,000 votes in Alabama in 2016 , moore got 650,000 ( plus there was 22,000 write ins for another republican )

Clinton got 729,547 votes in 2016 and lost the state massively , jones got 671,00 votes ( so he actually won the senate seat with less votes than Clinton got In 2016 ) indicating democrat voters simply turned out in greater numbers for this election

the voting make up of the state doesn't appear to have actually changed , voter turnout factors appeared to have helped the democrats

although jones will have to run for re election during a presidential election year 2020 and many more republicans will show up to the polls , leading me to suspect its unlikely this seat stays blue for long
Bugs





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PostPosted: Mon Dec 18, 2017 2:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pardon me if I congratulate myself on my skepticism.

I think I have it right on Al Franken. First of all, he won his election by some hinkey means or another in a recount. Second, his style is to irritate people as much as possible, at which he is more than merely proficient. Third,, his politics. But I still thought he was being drubbed on the sexual allegations. The thought of Al Franken causing the ladies to faint with his boorishness doesn't quite fit with my Houswives of Washington image.

And then, when he said he would resign down the road, and issued a non-apologetic apology, I said that I didn't believe it. Now, look at this!

Quote:
SO MUCH FOR THE MORAL HIGH GROUND: Top Democrats Change Their Minds On Franken, Want Him Not To Resign
ByBEN SHAPIRO

December 18, 2017
Two weeks ago, when it appeared that Alabama Senate Republican candidate Roy Moore could cruise to victory despite credible allegations of molestation of a 14-year-old girl and a 16-year-old girl, Democrats went all-in on their #MeToo strategy: they decided to dump Sen. Al Franken (D-MN) on the side of the road to grab the moral high ground on sexual abuse. Franken reluctantly announced his resignation, all the while indignantly maintaining his innocence.

Then the voters of Alabama cast Moore out into the darkness. And the Democrats have no ability to claim the moral high ground — Moore isn’t around to use as a whipping post. Which means, of course, that top Democrats now want to walk back Franken’s resignation.

Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) stated, “What they did to Al was atrocious, the Democrats.” He called Democratic attempts to oust Franken, “The most hypocritical thing I’ve ever seen done to a human being — and then have enough guts to sit on the floor, watch him give his speech and go over and hug him? That’s hypocrisy at the highest level I’ve ever seen in my life. Made me sick.”

Sen. Pat Leahy (D-VT), who called for Franken’s ouster, has secretly told Franken he regrets doing so, according to Politico. Two other senators who sided against Franken apparently told Politico the same thing.

Why? Because Democrats aren’t interested in wiping out sexual abuse. They were interested in the political hay to be made by pretending to care about doing so. With Moore out, that possibility is minimized. Now, Democrats could attempt to target President Trump over allegations of sexual abuse, but that strategy has little credibility after Bill Clinton, and it has little capacity to motivate after Trump was elected despite the presence of sexual harassment and abuse allegations. Democrats know that’s going nowhere, so why bother using it as an attack line against Trump? [....]
https://www.dailywire.com/news/24796/so-much-moral-high-ground-top-democrats-change-ben-shapiro?utm_source=shapironewsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_content=121817-news&utm_campaign=position1


I have it right about Justin, too.
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Dec 29, 2017 9:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( franken will soon leave the senate , some had speculated he might try and stay )


Democrat Franken says goodbye in Minnesota


By Dom Calicchio | Fox News



Sen. Al Franken will resign on January 2nd

Minnesota lawmaker is stepping down amid sexual misconduct allegations.

U.S. Sen. Al Franken said goodbye to staff members and supporters in Minneapolis on Thursday night, in his first public appearance in Minnesota since being accused of sexual harassment.


Franken will officially step down from the Senate on Tuesday, with his successor – Minnesota Lt. Gov. Tina Smith – scheduled to be sworn in Wednesday to complete Franken’s term, the Minneapolis Star-Tribune reported.

The Democrat, a former "Saturday Night Live" writer and performer, said he didn't know what to expect when he first ran for office, “and of course, neither did Minnesotans.”

Franken thanked his wife, Franni, their family and his staff as well as Minnesota's senior senator, Democrat Amy Klobuchar. He said he still feels like "the luckiest kid in the world.”

Franken announced plans to resign Dec. 7, one day after a seventh claim of sexual harassment emerged against him.

Following that development a chorus of female Democratic senators -- including New York’s Kirsten Gillibrand and California’s Kamala Harris -- calling for his resignation, effectively forcing his departure.


Franken’s departure will come about seven months after the publication of his latest book, “Al Franken: Giant of the Senate.”

Fox News' Joseph Weber and the Associated Press contributed to this story.


http://www.foxnews.com/politic.....esota.html
Bugs





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PostPosted: Fri Dec 29, 2017 1:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I remain sceptical.

This was a future major swamp creature, in my book. With control of the Senate so close, I can't see the Democrats leaving themselves open like this.

That said, I never saw his transgression as sufficiently vile as to cause this. It's a joke photo, and he's following the standards set by Teddy Kennedy and gawd knows, he's a hero of the Democratic Party.

What is lost in all of this is the role of the women in encouraging these kinds of practices. It seems that when women get around powerful men, they find a little fanny-patting all part of the 'getting to know you' process. And if they are intelligent and ambitious women, the temptation is increased. Say no more. But when the starlet goes to Harvey's apartment to 'work on' her role -- in a world where 'everybody knows about Harvey' -- what do you suppose she chooses to wear? She could go in a jump suit with hidden zippers, like a ninja. Or she could take a collaborator. Or she could feel ill.

I don't know what the answer is, but I know this isn't it.

Can we talk about this? The use of sex to get advantages ... works both ways. The main feature of the bad old days, with its jobs ghettos, was there was no sex at work. Even in the army, there was no sex in the army. Buggering your bunkmate could get you a nasty period in the brig and then a quick dishonourable discharge. Now it gets you an extra stripe.

Of course we can't talk about that. Nonetheless, I think Franken is being treated very unfairly, as far as what I have seen. I can't believe he would depart so easily when he fought so hard to get the seat in the first place. He could easily have been targeted for a phoney attack. It's just a feeding frenzy in the media.
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2018 4:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( at 83 you think retirement would of seemed natural but apparently this announcement was a surprise although a very safe republican seat )


Sen. Orrin Hatch announces he will not run for re-election in 2018


Adam Shaw By Adam Shaw | Fox News



Chairman of the Senate Budget Committee Orrin Hatch (R-UT) speaks at the start of the House-Senate Conferees conference meeting on the "Tax Cuts and Jobs Act" on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., December 13, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts - RC131011E000



Utah Senator Orrin Hatch, the longest serving GOP senator, announced Tuesday that he will not seek re-election in 2018 – opening up a possible pathway to the political resurrection of 2012 Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney.


The 83-year-old Republican, who first took his seat in 1977, had been debating whether to run again in 2018, and President Trump had publicly beseeched him not to retire.

In a video statement released Tuesday, Hatch said that he would vacate the seat at the end of his term.


"I was an amateur boxer in my youth, and I brought that fighting spirit with me to Washington,” Hatch said. “But every good fighter knows when to hang up the gloves. And for me, that time is soon approaching.”

Romney, a former governor of Massachussets and a vocal critic of the president, is widely reported to be considering running for Hatch’s seat. In a statement, Romney said Hatch had "represented the interests of Utah with distinction and honor."


The move is a blow for Trump, who pushed Hatch to stay on in a visit to Utah in December.


“We hope you will continue to serve your state and your country in the Senate for a very long time to come,” Trump said.

Hatch has been a strong supporter of the president’s agenda, and as chairman of the Senate Finance Committee was a key player in getting the tax reform bill passed in December.

White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said at the daily press briefing Tuesday that Trump is "very sad" to see Hatch leave.

“The president certainly has the greatest and deepest amount of respect for Senator Hatch and his over four decades of experience in the Senate,” Sanders said. “He is particularly thankful for the senator's leadership and massive effort that he played and the role that he played in getting the tax cut and reform package passed.”

In his statement, Hatch noted that he had authored more bills that became law than any living member of Congress. He also hailed the passage of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act as one of his proudest legislative achievements.

“I'm deeply grateful for the privilege you've given me to serve as your Senator these last four decades,” he said in the statement. “I may be leaving the Senate, but the next chapter in my public service is just beginning.”

http://www.foxnews.com/politic.....-2018.html
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2018 4:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Michele Bachmann says she's considering running for Al Franken's Senate seat


By Nicole Darrah | Fox News


Former Minnesota congresswoman Michelle Bachmann said Tuesday that she's mulling the possibility of running for Al Franken's Senate seat.


Former Minnesota congresswoman Michelle Bachmann said Tuesday that she's mulling the possibility of running for Al Franken's Senate seat. (Glenn Stubbe/Star Tribune via AP)

Former Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-Minn., is considering running for the recently vacated U.S. Senate seat held by Al Franken.



“I’ve had people contact me and urge me to run for that Senate seat,” Bachmann said recently on televangelist Jim Bakker's television show. “And the only reason I would run is for the ability to take these principles into the United States Senate and to be able to advocate for these principles.”

AL FRANKEN RESIGNS: HERE'S WHAT HAPPENS TO HIS SENATE SEAT


Bachmann, a religious conservative who served four terms in Congress, said she and her husband are considering the option to run for Franken’s Senate seat, but said there’s “a price you pay” when running for a political office of that stature.

“The question is, is it—should it be me? Should it be now? But there’s also a price you pay. And the price is bigger than ever because the swamp is so toxic,” Bachmann said, noting her and her husband “aren’t money people.”


bachmann franken reuters

Bachmann, left, said Tuesday she's considering running for the recently vacated Senate seat once held by Al Franken, right. (REUTERS/Yuri Gripas)

The one-time Republican presidential candidate said it'd be pricey to "defend yourself ... You can have frivolous lawsuits filed against you all the time and then what do you do?"

“If you’re going against the tide in D.C., if you’re trying to stand for biblical principles in D.C. and you stick your head up out of the hole, you know, the blades come whirring and they try to chop you off,” Bachmann said. “This is not an easy place to be.”

REPUBLICANS WHO WON'T BE COMING BACK TO CONGRESS AFTER 2018 MIDTERM ELECTIONS

Bachmann unsuccessfully ran for the Republican Party nomination in the 2012 presidential race, and is a deeply conservative Republican with a history of making controversial statements, including suggesting in 2012 that the federal government was being overtaken by the Muslim Brotherhood.

Franken officially resigned from his Senate seat Tuesday after numerous sexual misconduct allegations were made against him late last year. Minnesota Lt. Gov. Tina Smith, who was selected to take over Franken's seat, is expected to be sworn in Wednesday morning.


http://www.foxnews.com/politic.....-seat.html
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 10:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

With Senate up for grabs, control may come down to handful of races


Fox News


With 34 Senate seats up for grabs this year, Republicans would seem to have plenty of options for preserving their two-seat majority. But their success or failure will likely come down to a handful of closely watched races.


The Republican Party are employing a strategy of the best defense is a good offense, targeting Democratic incumbents in Florida, Missouri and West Virginia in a bid to increase their majority and provide insurance against anticipated losses.

President Trump last year won all three states, making Democrats Joe Manchin, of West Virginia, Claire McCaskill, of Missouri and Bill Nelson, of Florida GOP targets. Overall, the president won 10 states in which Senate Democrats are seeking reelection this year.




WEST VIRGINIA

West Virginia has become increasingly conservative in recent years, with the GOP now holding all three House seats, controlling the state legislature and voters skewing Republican in the past five presidential elections. Trump won 68.5 percent of West Virginia votes in 2016.


In this March 29, 2011, file photo Senate Armed Services Committee member Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va. listens to testimony on Capitol Hill in Washington.

Manchin is a moderate Democrat, but his state leans Republican and the GOP would like to replace him with one of their own (Associated Press)

Republicans, including Trump, have reached out to the moderate Manchin for bipartisan support on bills, but the election gives them a chance to replace him with one of their own.

“Joe’s a nice guy … but he doesn’t do anything,” Trump recently told the New York Times.


A general view of the U.S. Capitol building in Washington February 28, 2013. REUTERS/Jason Reed


National Republican Senatorial Committee spokesman Bob Salera was more blunt: “President Trump has exposed Joe Manchin for what he really is -- a phony centrist who will always vote with Washington Democrats when it really matters. … Manchin’s refusal to work across the aisle on anything of substance will be devastating to his reelection chances.”

FLORIDA

Nelson hasn’t invited a GOP challenge. He is not a vocal Trump critic and has served three terms with no major controversies. But the 75-year-old senator’s relatively low-key style appears to be hurting his reelection efforts. One poll shows half of registered voters “don’t know” how effective he is in Congress.

Beyond Trump’s 2016 success in Florida, Washington Republicans like their chances of beating Nelson based on strength of their preferred candidate, outgoing GOP Gov. Rick Scott.

They like Scott for several reasons, including his solid job-approval rating and success in Florida’s recent hurricane preparedness and recovery efforts. His wealth from a career as a health care executive would allow him to largely fund his own campaign.


Florida Gov. Rick Scott speaks during his State of the State speech Tuesday, March 4, 2014 on the floor of the House of Representatives at the Capitol in Tallahassee, Fla. Scott touted Florida's improving economy in his speech that drew a contrast between the recession years under former Gov. Charlie Crist and the jobs created during his first three years in office. (AP Photo/Phil Sears)

Will he or won't he? Republicans hope outgoing Florida Gov. Rick Scott will run against Nelson (Associated Press)

Trump appears to be recruiting Scott, even hosting him for lunch last week at the president’s Mar-a-Lago estate in South Florida.

Several early polls show Scott in a tight theoretical race with Nelson. But the governor has yet to officially commit, with energized Democrats and Trump’s low approval rating creating a tough political climate next year for Republican candidates.

The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee deemed 2017 “The Year of the Republican Recruitment Failure” and continues to argue that the lack of top-tier candidates is setting up “divisive” and expensive GOP primaries that will help the party in the general elections.


“They refuse to run against formidable Democrats,” a party official said Tuesday. The official also acknowledged that Democrats indeed face a difficult election map, in which they must defend 34 seats, including two held by Independents, compared to eight for Republicans.

ARIZONA

Democrats say a prime example of Republicans’ candidate woes is the likely GOP primary battle to replace outgoing Arizona GOP Sen. Jeff Flake, an outspoken Trump critic.

Arizona is among the country’s most conservative-leaning states. But the anticipated matchup between GOP Rep. Martha McSally and Kelli Ward, Democrats say, could leave either damaged or financially drained enough to allow for an upset by Democrat Rep. Kyrsten Sinema.

Ward is a former state legislator and doctor who lost a 2016 primary challenge against Sen. John McCain.

She has the backing of Steve Bannon, the Breitbart News executive chairman and former Trump political strategist who is trying to dismantle the Washington establishment, with his own brand of candidates.

“Dr. Ward believes in defending the Constitution, securing the border, repealing ObamaCare, growing the economy and fixing the disastrous VA system for our veterans,” the campaign says about its candidate.

Bannon’s full-on support for GOP candidate Roy Moore in the recent special Alabama Senate race proved disastrous for Republicans, giving Democrats the seat for the first time in 25 years and cutting the GOP Senate majority to 51-49.

Trump has expressed support for Ward, tweeting this summer: “Great to see that Dr. Kelli Ward is running against Flake Jeff Flake, who is WEAK on borders, crime and a non-factor in Senate. He's toxic!"

However, he has yet to endorse the insurgent candidate. In fact, a White House official was quick to make clear last week that Ward was not at Mar-a-Lago over the holiday season to meet with the president and said that the two only “exchanged pleasantries.”

McSally, a former Air Force fighter pilot who’s considered a rising GOP star, did not publically endorse Trump and has publically opposed some of the president’s comments and political positions, including his threat to abandon NATO allies. She has yet to say whether she will indeed run for the open seat.

INDIANA, MISSOURI, NEVADA

Scott Rasmussen, a Republican-leaning strategist, thinks the outcome of the Indiana, Missouri and Nevada Senate races will be a predictor for the other 31 contests and for which party will lead the chamber.

Democratic incumbent Sens. Joe Donnelly, of Indiana, and Claire McCaskill, of Missouri, are running in states Trump carried. And GOP Sen. Dean Heller is seeking a second full term in Nevada, the only state that Hillary Clinton carried in 2016 in which a Republican is up for reelection.


Senator Claire McCaskill (D-MO) questions Kirstjen Nielsen on her nomination to be secretary of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) during a hearing before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee in Washington, U.S., November 8, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts - RC1AB356B800

Republicans are eyeing the Missouri Senate seat, currently held by Claire McCaskill

“If Democrats want to win control the Senate, they will have to win all three races,” Rasmussen said Tuesday. “And if the political environment is good enough for them to win all three, races like Arizona will also head in that direction. If Republicans win all three, then you have to think they might beat Manchin or (North Dakota’s) Heidi Heitkamp.”

Rasmussen noted that Election Day is 11 months away, and said voter turnout will be a major factor.

Democratic Senate Campaign Committee spokesman David Bergstein believes his party's base will be energized, as it was in the recent special election Alabama, where Democrats won a seat in a traditionally red state.

“Obviously Senate Democrats face a very challenging map, but Republicans are facing expensive and divisive primaries and an electorate that is repulsed by their agenda -- higher health care costs, a tax hike on working families, and months of total control of Washington that has produced nothing but broken promises," Bergstein said. "We are running with strong incumbents and challengers, and are preparing to take advantage of every opportunity we can.”


http://www.foxnews.com/politic.....races.html
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 11:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Indiana assuming the GOP nominates well should be a win;
Mike Pence is still very popular in the State and him campaigning with someone like Todd
Rokita should be a pretty straightforward win.

Its interesting how little discussion Montana is getting;
Its a +11 (GOP) (Missouri is only +9) and Jon Tester came out very strong against the tax plan.

If someone like Ryan Zinke runs it should be in play.
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 12:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
Indiana assuming the GOP nominates well should be a win;
Mike Pence is still very popular in the State and him campaigning with someone like Todd
Rokita should be a pretty straightforward win.

Its interesting how little discussion Montana is getting;
Its a +11 (GOP) (Missouri is only +9) and Jon Tester came out very strong against the tax plan.

If someone like Ryan Zinke runs it should be in play.



I hadn't heard that Florida might be a republican target but a state they have won in before .

Its hard to believe Indiana wouldn't be in play , its a very red state , the VP Pence is from there . the democrats though they had the senate seat secured in 2016 after they nominated a former senator only to lose to a republican , it be foolish for them to assume it was safe this year , based simply on some wins in areas not really connected to the state

everyone knows the only reason Doug Jones won in Alabama was that Roy Moore was a truly horrible candidate who couldn't of won a state wide election anywhere


Montana and North Dakota should also both be competitive , although its unclear how much of an advantage the democrats have by having incumbents in both races ? if I was a republican strategist I'd prefer the demographics of North Dakota over Nevada , its the type of place republicans do well , white , rural , not many major cities and lots of oil and gas workers and trump won the state with 60% of the vote and won nearly every county .

although it was an "open " seat in 2012 when the current democrat won by only 1% over a republican congressmen . but its hard to explain why such a red state would even want a democratic senator to begin with ? it be like Vermont or Rhode Island electing a republican to obstruct the democratic agenda , it make no sense
Bugs





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votes: 8

PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 5:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

One of the more amusing things on the media right now is their conviction that the Republicans are going to be thumped as hard as Obama was in his first mid-term.

They might actually believe that.

However, if the budget reforms are showing any signs of a robust recovery in jobs and wages, it probably will be a very good election for Trump and the Republicans.

There is also the disturbing revelations that keep coming out about Hillary's gang in the Deep State. It's hard to believe that Comey, McCabe, and Ohr aren't going to be charged criminally, and from there, the potential list is huge.

The first black President of the United States turned out to be a Chicago-style thug, politically. People in the IRS and the various intelligence agencies probably aren't sleeping too well these days. Ditto with Loretta Lynch, the director of the DoJ, and we haven't even gotten to Eric Holder yet.

It's hard to see how this is going to help the Democrats.
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2018 - US Midterm Elections

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