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RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Nov 25, 2017 2:34 pm    Post subject: Ontario pc's hold policy convention Reply with quote

Ontario PC convention chance for leader Patrick Brown to chart new course

Opposition party to present nearly 140 broad policy resolutions contributed by members

The Canadian Press Posted: Nov 25, 2017 6:44 AM ET| Last Updated: Nov 25, 2017 2:19 PM ET

Ontario PC Leader Patrick Brown has been busy trying to fend off Liberal attacks that suggest he is a thinly disguised social conservative.


​With just over six months before Ontario's next provincial election, opposition Progressive Conservative Leader Patrick Brown is meeting with party faithful on Saturday to shore up support and possibly announce new policy.

About 1,500 Ontario Progressive Conservatives are gathered in Toronto to hone their election strategy, receive training, and hear a keynote address from leader Patrick Brown. The party will also present 139 broad policy resolutions that have been adopted by members.

Kevin Gaudet, PC convention co-chairman, said the gathering at the Toronto Congress Centre will give Brown, who he acknowledges is still little known by most in the province, a chance to speak to a wide audience.
■Tax cuts, hydro rebates, daycare refunds highlight Ontario PC campaign promises

"I expect that Patrick Brown's speech will be a watershed speech that people should tune into," he said. "I'm highly optimistic that Ontarians will see the beginnings of important announcements to come as we lead up to next year's election."

INTERNATIONAL PLOWING MATCH 20170919
Ontario Progressive Conservative Leader Patrick Brown speaks at the International Plowing Match in Walton, Ont., on Sept. 19, 2017. (Dave Chidley/Canadian Press)

Gaudet said the policy convention won't actually include much debate about policy — that has already occurred over the past 18 months within the party itself. Brown will use the policy resolutions to develop the Tory election platform in greater detail in the coming months, he said.

"We have no intention of re-visiting decisions that have already been made at this point in time," Gaudet said. "Instead, we're looking forward to a fulsome conversation and hearing (Brown's) speech and vision for getting Ontario back on-track."

Many of the policy resolutions adopted by party members are broad. They range from statements like making "life more affordable for families with young children" to working "to expand all-season roads to remote communities in Northern Ontario."

But Brown told The Canadian Press earlier this month that some topics, including social conservative issues, will be off limits at the convention.

"Any policy that attempts to limit a woman's right to choose or the ability of same-sex couples to marry are off limits, period," Brown said.

Patrick Brown
Ontario Progressive Conservative Leader Patrick Brown walks on Lawrence Avenue East in Toronto before speaking to the media. (Paul Smith/CBC)

Brown, who as a former backbench MP in former prime minister Stephen Harper's government had voted in favour of reopening the abortion debate, has been busy trying to fend off Liberal attacks that he is a thinly disguised social conservative. He says he is pro-choice and more recently has led Pride parade delegations.

Social conservatives inside the party have accused Brown of flip-flopping on the issue of sex education — Brown spoke at an anti-sex-ed rally during the leadership campaign, promised in an email to a supporter that he would repeal Ontario's updated sex-ed curriculum, and then promised in a letter in a 2016 byelection to scrap it, though he later said he was unaware of the letter before it went out.

Carbon tax is another policy that will be off limits at the weekend convention.

Brown has already promised he would dismantle the current cap-and-trade program to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and instead implement a carbon tax that would be offset by other tax cuts — to the chagrin of some of the base.

Gaudet said the party is prepared for some push-back from members who disagree with the direction Brown is taking the PCs.

"I would say we're prepared for any eventuality," he said.

"We are a broad-based party ... For those who may not have gotten their way on any issue we'd say, like in any environment, one doesn't always get their way on everything. At the end of the day, we hope and expect that those individuals recognize that (Brown's) vision is a good vision."

Henry Jacek, a political science professor at McMaster University, said the challenge for Brown at the convention will be
to move away from his current "risk averse" strategy and to set himself apart from the Liberal government with new ideas.

"Most of the resolutions seem to be very vague and general," he said. "It's often dangerous in politics and sports. It's like you're sitting on the lead in a hockey game going into the final period and ... you say, I'm just not going to make any mistakes now and I'll win this game. That often doesn't work."

'Campaigns matter'

Jacek said the convention will also need to serve as a chance for Brown to appeal to, and unite, the disparate elements in his party who disagree with elements of his agenda.

"He's got a tough time trying to keep everyone together and make sure that no big mistakes are made that could cost him his lead," he said.

Gaudet said the party is aware of its political record — having lost four consecutive elections to the Liberals — and even with a healthy lead in most opinion polls, members can't let up.

"Polling leads don't matter, campaigns matter," he said. "No one takes anything for granted. There's a lot of hard work to do."

Liberal Transportation Minister Steven Del Duca will attend the Tory convention Saturday as an observer. He said it's "ridiculous" that it's taken years for the party under Brown's leadership to come up with its policies.

"The people of Ontario have had more than two years to get to know Patrick Brown and to try to figure out where he stands on the issues that are so important for them and their families," he said.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/.....-1.4419647
RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Nov 25, 2017 4:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

November 25, 2017 12:11 pm Updated: November 25, 2017 3:38 pm

Ontario Progressive Conservatives promise to cut taxes and hydro rates in election platform


By Shawn Jeffords The Canadian Press


An Ontario Progressive Conservative government would introduce tax cuts for the middle class, a refund for childcare expenses and a further 12 per cent cut to hydro bills if elected in next spring’s provincial vote.

The party released its 2018 election platform – presented as a 78-page glossy magazine and called the “People’s Guarantee” – at a policy convention today in Toronto.

The tax cuts, childcare refund and hydro cuts are part of five promises that make up the core of the Tory plan and also include a pledge to spend $1.9 billion over the next decade to create a mental health-care system and plan to introduce legislation to address government integrity and accountability.


PC Leader Patrick Brown says if he cannot implement his five main promises he will not seek a second term as premier.

Approximately 1,500 Ontario Progressive Conservatives are gathered to hone their election strategy, receive training and hear a keynote address from leader Patrick Brown.

The Tory tax cuts would reduce costs for Ontarians with the lowest incomes by 2022. People making a up to $42,960 see their tax rate cut from 5.05 per cent to 4.5 per cent. People making from $42,960 to $85,923 will see their tax rate cut from 9.15 per cent to 7.1 per cent.

The plan would also introduce the Ontario Child Care Refund, a refundable tax credit based on household income. Under the plan, a mother who earns $35,000 a year and has a child under six would be eligible for a refund of $6,750 in child care costs.

The payments for lower income families who qualify for the credit could receive the refund payments in the form of a monthly cheque.

READ MORE: PC leader Patrick Brown says he’ll ignore Kathleen Wynne’s ‘baseless’ libel threat

The Tories say they will cut hydro rates for the average household by 12 per cent, or $173 annually, through a number of measures including returning the $350 million dividend from Hydro One to ratepayers.

The plan pledges to create a comprehensive mental health-care system by investing $1.9 billion over the next decade, matching federal funding put towards the same.

The Tory platform calls for the creation of a Trust, Integrity and Accountability Act to address “political corruption” in the province. It would close fundraising loopholes in existing legislation and restore the auditor general’s power to vet government advertising.

WATCH: Brown says ‘accountability’ fifth key election platform point


Play Video

Beyond the five key pillars of the plan, the platform has more than 140 other promises. They cover a wide range of issues from transit to health care.

The Tories are promising to end the Liberals’ cap-and-trade program by July 1, 2019, and withdraw from the Western Climate Initiative. The party says it would instead opt in to federal carbon pricing bench marks and return all proceeds of the program to taxpayers.

The platform promises to pay $5 billion for new and existing subway projects in Toronto. The Tory plan offers to take on the full cost, plus any overrun, for the controversial Scarborough subway extension. In exchange, the City of Toronto would be asked to assume the costs of a light-rail project in the city’s east end which extends to a University of Toronto campus.

The platform also would see the province upload hundreds of millions each year in infrastructure and maintenance from the Toronto Transit Commission for its subway system. The TTC would continue to receive all revenue from the fare box and control the entire transit system.


The Tories say their platform spending has been reviewed by former federal Parliamentary Budget Officer Kevin Page who has been “deemed reasonable”.

It projects that a PC government would fall into deficit of $2.8 billion in its first year, while posting progressive surpluses that range from $8 million in 2019-2020 to $767 million in 2021-2022.



News of parts of the Tory plan leaked Friday evening, prompting blistering condemnation from the governing Liberal Party. Transportation Minister Steven Del Duca said the platform a “Say Anything” plan.

“Let’s be clear – any time a Conservative says they can lower taxes without making cuts they end up cutting services,” Del Duca said in a statement. “Patrick Brown is fundamentally cut from the same cloth as Harper and Harris and core services like education and health care are in for a rough ride under this scheme. That’s the Conservative way.”


https://globalnews.ca/news/3881077/ontario-progressive-conservatives-toronto-election-strategy/
RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Nov 25, 2017 4:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

the main aspect of the new policy seems to be something called the peoples guarantee , which is 5 key points

- lower income taxes
-refund of child care expenses
- 12% more off hydro bill
- mental health commitment
- trust integrity and accountability act



https://www.ontariopc.ca/peoplesguarantee
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Nov 27, 2017 8:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

PCs vow to cut taxes and hydro rates in platform


By Shawn Jeffords, The Canadian Press — Nov 25 2017


TORONTO — Ontario Progressive Conservative Leader Patrick Brown says if he's elected premier next spring he will introduce tax cuts for the middle class, a refund for childcare expenses and a further 12 per cent cut to hydro bills.

Brown introduced the party's 2018 election platform — presented as a 78-page glossy magazine and called the "People's Guarantee" — at a policy convention today in Toronto.

The tax cuts, childcare refund and hydro cuts are part of five promises that make up the core of the Tory plan and also include a pledge to spend $1.9 billion over the next decade on mental health care. And in a direct jab at Premier Kathleen Wynne's government, Brown said he plans to introduce legislation to address integrity and accountability at Queen's Park.

"This is your platform," Brown said to a cheering crowd at the Toronto Congress Centre. "This is Ontario's platform. This is a platform for change."

Brown said if he cannot implement his five main promises he will not seek a second term as premier. He also tried to fire up supporters ahead of the six month long run up to the vote.

"Friends these are significant promises that we are making to the province of Ontario," he said. "And friends, this is the last time we're going to be together before the next election. The next six months will not be easy. ... I will be tested. You will be tested. But I know you're ready for it. I've seen it."

Approximately 1,500 party members gathered to hone their election strategy, receive training and hear the keynote address from Brown.

The Tory tax cuts would reduce costs for Ontarians with the lowest incomes by 2022. People making up to $42,960 would see their tax rate cut from 5.05 per cent to 4.5 per cent. People making from $42,960 to $85,923 would see their tax rate cut from 9.15 per cent to 7.1 per cent.

The plan would also introduce the Ontario Child Care Refund, a tax credit based on household income. Under the plan, a mother who earns $35,000 a year and has a child under six would be eligible for a refund of $6,750 in child care costs.

Lower income families who qualify for the credit could receive the refund payments in the form of a monthly cheque.

The Tories say they will cut hydro rates for the average household by 12 per cent, or $173 annually, through a number of measures which include returning the $350 million dividend from Hydro One to ratepayers.

The plan pledges the creation of a comprehensive mental health-care system by investing $1.9 billion over the next decade, matching federal funding put towards the same task.

Brown promised to create a Trust, Integrity and Accountability Act to address "political corruption" in the province. It would close fundraising loopholes in existing legislation and restore the auditor general's power to vet government advertising.

Liberal Transportation Minister Steven Del Duca, who attended the convention as an observer, launched a blistering attack of the platform, calling the magazine it was presented in something better suited for the "fiction section of Chapters."

"The next election is not a game," Del Duca said. "Promising everything under the sun to everybody under the sun and pretending there will be no pain is not something that the people of this province deserve. They deserve a leader who levels with them."

Michael Balagus, Ontario NDP campaign director, called the Tory plan a disappointing "tweak" of Liberal programs. When the New Democrats introduce their platform in the coming months, it will underscore the stark contrast between Brown and NDP Leader Andrea Horwath and their policies, he said.

"They've got lots of cash, lots of gloss," Balagus said. "We know we're going into this campaign as the underdog. We're the guys who are going to have to scrap all the way. We're prepared for that. They can have the gloss, we'll have the substance."

Beyond the five key pillars of the plan, the platform has more than 140 other promises. They cover a wide range of issues from transit to health care. The plan will also keep many of the Liberal's biggest spending plans including free pharma care for anyone under the age of 24, all-day kindergarten and the free tuition plan for post-secondary students.

The Tories are promising to end the Liberals' cap-and-trade program by July 1, 2019, and withdraw from the Western Climate Initiative. The party says it would instead opt into federal carbon pricing bench marks and return all proceeds of the program to taxpayers.

The platform promises to pay $5 billion for new and existing subway projects in Toronto. The Tory plan offers to take on the full cost, plus any overrun, for the controversial Scarborough subway extension. In exchange, the City of Toronto would be asked to assume the costs of a light-rail project in the city's east end which extends to a University of Toronto campus.

The platform also would see the province upload hundreds of millions each year in infrastructure and maintenance from the Toronto Transit Commission for its subway system. The TTC would continue to receive all revenue from the fare box and control the entire transit system.

The Tories say their platform spending has been reviewed by former federal Parliamentary Budget Officer Kevin Page who has deemed it "reasonable."

The platform projects that a PC government would fall into deficit of $2.8 billion in its first year, while posting progressive surpluses that range from $8 million in 2019-2020 to $767 million in 2021-2022.

Shawn Jeffords, The Canadian Press

https://www.nationalnewswatch.com/2017/11/25/ontario-pc-convention-chance-for-leader-patrick-brown-to-chart-new-course/#.WhwZ3Un2Zjp
Bugs





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PostPosted: Mon Nov 27, 2017 10:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Platforms are serious, these days. It looks to me as if Patrick has learned the lessons of Mike Harris, and so far as avoided the baggage. He has spent time in the wilderness, and now the party has something akin to The Common Sense Revolution. If it follows the pattern, this will receive wide distribution by mail.

It's called "Peoples' Guarantee"

Everything about this is carefully crafted to overcome the objections. That's the first thing a salesman does -- overcomes the buyer's objections. I like it. It anticipates the Liberal attacks to come, and takes their issues away as best they can. Selley says it isn't the Common Sense Revolution, but it is a different context. This is a document that seeks to establish trust, reliability, and a feeling that this is a change that isn't going to hurt.

Quote:
Chris Selley: You can argue it's 'Liberal lite,' but Ontario PC platform offers a pathway to victory
You can no longer accuse the Tories of just trying to ride into power on Kathleen Wynne’s soiled, tattered coattails

Chris Selley
November 26, 2017

Patrick Brown got it out of the way fairly early in his speech to the Ontario Progressive Conservative convention in Toronto on Saturday: “This platform recognizes that climate change is real, it must be taken seriously,” he said, risking mass revolt among the assembled party faithful. “But the platform does not use climate change as an excuse for a government cash grab.”

It was an artfully crafted applause line, and it got a ton of applause. Brown never actually said “carbon tax” — the federal Conservatives’ policy arch-nemesis. But it’s one of the signature elements of the slick, magazine-style Tory platform — titled the “People’s Guarantee” — that dropped at the convention.: A government led by Brown would scrap the Liberal cap-and-trade scheme and “opt in to the federal carbon pricing benchmark.” Ottawa has given the provinces no choice but to price carbon, the platform notes — and while it essentially invites readers to blame the feds if they don’t like it, the party has nevertheless embraced the most conservative approach, a revenue-neutral carbon tax, as opposed to the Liberals’ “slush fund.”

The Tories promise a 22 per cent cut in the second income bracket, and 10 per cent in the first. They promise to cut hydro rates by 12 per cent on top of what the Liberals have desperately. They promise a means-tested refund on child care expenses of up to 75 per cent. They promise to lower small business tax rates by 28.5 per cent.

That’s a strong pitch to the pocketbook, which they intend to fund, in the main, with carbon tax revenues and a 2 per cent across-the-board savings to be unearthed in a value-for-money audit. Arguing they’ve allowed for the traditional “hidden deficit” to be discovered upon their taking office, the Tories project a $2.8 billion deficit in 2018-19 and a return to balance in 2019-20, with future surpluses going to debt reduction.

Former Parliamentary Budget Officer Kevin Page, now of the Institute of Fiscal Studies and Democracy at the University of Ottawa, has signed off on the costing: It has been “deemed reasonable.”

Some other early reviews are positive as well. In a blog post, UBC economist Kevin Milligan argues the child care proposal “delivers the largest benefit to lower and middle income families who most need help with childcare expenses,” while also “support(ing) flexibility for those families who need part-time care, shiftwork, or irregular care.”

(Some reviews are not positive. Energy analyst Tom Adams accuses Brown of “continu(ing) the Wynne government’s fundamentally damaging, fraudulent electricity policies, but on a grander scale.”)

You can certainly argue it’s “Liberal lite.” The Common Sense Revolution, it isn’t.

Party officials want you to know that if the platform doesn’t explicitly propose to change something, it’s not going to get changed. And there are certainly some silly baubles in there: free wi-fi on GO trains ($20 million a year); restoring the subsidy-hog Northlander train to Cochrane ($45 million a year, or about $150 per passenger journey if ridership rebounds to 2012 levels); tax credits for kids’ arts and sports programs ($70 million) and winter tires ($19 million); a promise of $5 billion for new subways that contemplates wasting some of it on a patently ludicrous extension of the Sheppard subway to Scarborough Town Centre. (All aboard the White Elephant Connector!)

But you can no longer accuse these Tories of just trying to ride into power off Kathleen Wynne’s soiled, tattered coattails. It might not be especially conservative vision, but it is a vision — a different vision, a mostly defensible vision, an positive and upbeat vision despite its swipes at the Liberals, and a vision the Liberals will have some trouble trying to attack without looking foolish. (A simple carbon tax is the best policy, and they know it.)

In the hours since Saturday’s convention, the Liberals’ strategy appears totally unchanged: Brown will do the opposite of what he says he’ll do, they say; he’s a monster, basically. They immediately dusted off the spectre of Mike Harris and wheeled him out to terrify the children. Remember him? It’ll be even worse!

Do most Ontarians remember Mike Harris? I don’t really know. Patrick Brown was 17 when Mike Harris took office. When Ontarians next go to the polls, it will have been more than 16 years since he left. And whatever you think of the results, Harris did pretty much what he said he was going to do — and got reelected for his trouble.

If enough Ontarians believe Brown intends to do what his People’s Guarantee guarantees, and if enough Conservatives themselves can get behind a platform with which they might have a good few quibbles, then it just might be a pathway to victory. At the very least, on Saturday, Ontario politics got a whole lot more interesting and substantive than it was on Friday.

National Post
cselley@nationalpost.com http://nationalpost.com/opinio.....to-victory


There's more "vote-buying" than I would like, but one gets the feeling that a disciplined and careful mind is overseeing this plan. And I don't know how they are going to cut hydro bills more than they've already been cut, but I understand he is undoing electoral booby-traps here. The new minimum wage Wynne has espoused is another. But how? It's worrying, but I understand the strategy. And he is facing off with a viper.
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 27, 2017 11:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Its more Bill Davis than Mike Harris;
But I am okay with that.

Till you can get in there and actually review the books of the current government and discover all the landmines that are buried in there it would be reckless to make massive commitments like a PST portion of the HST reduction.

They are keeping it simple;
Much like the CPC in 2006.

While I feel it doesn't do enough to attract or expand job creators, I would imagine that will come.
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 27, 2017 11:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:

And I don't know how they are going to cut hydro bills more than they've already been cut,


I asked the same question;
My understanding is they are creatively reassigning revenue generated by their remaining stake in Hydro One and applying it to the bills of the consumers rather than dumping it into the coffers of the Provincial Government.
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 27, 2017 11:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I will say this;
The energy on the floor was vastly different than previous PC Conventions.
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 27, 2017 11:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I imagine, in the dark corners of the Albany Club, they remember the last election where the brash Mr. Hudak led off with the painful part -- big time austerity, oh boy! Harris, you will recall, had not only to deal with the mess Bob Rae had left, and the cuts in transfers that Martin had imposed on Ontario most of all. But I know it is fashionable for members of the Progressive Conservative party to think of those as the bad old days.

I also imagine there is a plan to get elected, and a plan to start making those kinds of changes too ... the thing is, the jobs created have to be real jobs. And any big employer with any smarts whatever will extract concessions to locate in Canada and more from the province, and even more from the municipality if it can. It's what we do to replace investment capital.

That's just the world these days. I would like to see our debt addressed like Hudak did, but how do you sell austerity to the public? At the time, I cheered Hudak for his candour. It was an election that, by all normal calculus, we should have won, and that approach cost us a lot because it confirmed the unions' participation 100%. That's still a political reality, it's just that this government is so-oo ba-aa-ad that it can't be allowed to continue. Progressive Conservatives have a positive patriotic obligation to throw these bums out.
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 27, 2017 12:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would ask the question;
How do you sell austerity to the public, when you have no idea how bad the books really are?

When you see things like this;
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/ontario-liberals-violating-accounting-rules-to-mask-impact-of-cutting-hydro-bills-auditor/article36636909/

Especially on something that was thrown together without the usual tact and timing that many other programs have had before they were moved forward, it causes me to pause and ask "Just what else is buried in there?"
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 27, 2017 12:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
I would like to see our debt addressed like Hudak did, but how do you sell austerity to the public? At the time, I cheered Hudak for his candour. It was an election that, by all normal calculus, we should have won, and that approach cost us a lot because it confirmed the unions' participation 100%. That's still a political reality, it's just that this government is so-oo ba-aa-ad that it can't be allowed to continue. Progressive Conservatives have a positive patriotic obligation to throw these bums out.


I think the approach to addressing the debt was done with some tact;
Brown has committed to balancing the books before the end of his mandate.

If he walks in and his Finance Minister after a few months realizes that the current government overstated revenue, understated potential risk, and the outlook is more bleak than was original anticipated;

Could you not in theory use that campaign promise as a means to cut spending?
If suddenly you find you are billions of dollars short in potential revenue and you have committed to tax cuts, I wouldn't be shocked if he pushed forward to balance the budget anyway by way of reducing spending.
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 27, 2017 1:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nobody knows how bad it is, but they know it's bad enough.

I see what you mean however. Everything that Wynne has done has had the effect of confirming the idea that she's desperate to get re-elected, and she's doing things that aren't good for the province. Let's hope there are enough 905-ers that are serious enough to shift the balance.
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 27, 2017 1:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
I will say this;
The energy on the floor was vastly different than previous PC Conventions.



I agree that we haven't seen an Ontario pc convention like this in some time


my concern might be there acting like they've already won , when in fact the battle is just beginning , its clear the Ontario liberals have no other reason for existence other than to be in power , they've broken so many promises and literally stolen half the ndp platform by this point . there only goal is to be in power , this is a party obsessed with being in power , there not out to be the official opposition .

the pc's have to realise these guys and there Union and media friends , will literally do anything to stay in power , that's what were up against , the crazy smear ads and accusations are only beginning .

but there in a good position , polls show descent leads province wide , a large number of liberal mpp's aren't even running again and voters generally seem ready for a new party in power . but the battle isn't won yet , I won't believe wynne is finished until election night and its clear she's been defeated until then there is always a chance she will find a way to sneak back in
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Nov 27, 2017 2:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
I would ask the question;
How do you sell austerity to the public, when you have no idea how bad the books really are?

When you see things like this;
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/ontario-liberals-violating-accounting-rules-to-mask-impact-of-cutting-hydro-bills-auditor/article36636909/

Especially on something that was thrown together without the usual tact and timing that many other programs have had before they were moved forward, it causes me to pause and ask "Just what else is buried in there?"



I think its clear austerity doesn't really sell although considering Ontario's debt it clearly has to be necessary in some areas or the province will never get out of debt and become the next Puerto Rico


I've always though the liberals wanted to be known as the anti austerity party , the one's where things are easy and money flows freely , they don't want to upset there union friends and stop the good times . they seem unwilling to do anything to get Ontario's finances in order and out of debt


in 2014 the liberals basically campaigned on the idea every civil service job was a "sacred cow " and that if any jobs were cut the province will fall into ruin . somehow they managed to find a % of the public so uninformed and delusional they believed this . its of course far from reality and everyone knows they could find ways to make reduce the amount spent on staff ,

one idea might be to not fire people but simply reduce there amount of pay , there is way too many civil servants in Ontario making over $100,000 these days , the sunshine lists are massive and its out of control but I somehow think the unions wouldn't even go for this , they actually want raises as we saw with college strike
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Ontario pc's hold policy convention

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