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RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Oct 13, 2017 8:59 pm    Post subject: Finance Minister Morneau owns a secret french villa ? Reply with quote

( I've made it clear many times I never liked this guy for some reason from day 1 but this just makes him look even worse )


Finance Minister Bill Morneau waited 2 years to disclose company that owns his French villa to ethics watchdog

Ethics commissioner 'should make an example' of Morneau says NDP MP


Photo of Elizabeth Thompson

Elizabeth Thompson · Senior Reporter · CBC
7 Hours Ago


Question Period 20171003
Finance Minister Bill Morneau disclosed to the ethics commissioner on Sept.22 that he has owned a private company for 10 years. (Fred Chartrand/Canadian Press)



22k shares

2666 comments


Finance Minister Bill Morneau waited two years to disclose a private corporation that owns a villa in southern France that he shares with his wife to Canada's ethics watchdog, CBC News has learned.

In fact, Morneau only disclosed the corporation to conflict of interest and ethics commissioner Mary Dawson's office after CBC News discovered its existence and began asking questions.

Morneau's office says the failure to disclose the company is the result of "early administrative confusion." Communications director Dan Lauzon said the villa was disclosed but the company was not.

Still, opposition critics say they are troubled by the finance minister's failure to fully disclose all of the private companies he owns.

"I guess that he expects us to believe that he's so rich that he just forgot that he has a private corporation in France and a wonderful villa in Provence," said Conservative MP Pierre Poilievre. "It's a little hard to believe."



Morneau's disclosure came after a search by CBC News of corporate records in France revealed that Morneau is listed as a partner in the company SCI Mas des Morneau, which owns and manages a villa in the picturesque town of Oppède in France's Provence region.

Morneau's wife, Nancy McCain, a member of the wealthy family that owns McCain Foods, is named as a partner.

According to the Greffe du Tribunal de Commerce d'Avignon's registry, the company was incorporated on Aug. 17, 2007. Among the company's activities listed in the registry are real estate, rentals and leases.

Oppède, France
The picturesque town of Oppède, France where Finance Minister Morneau owns a villa connected to a private corporation. (Shutterstock / Magdanatka)

Tax experts say there can be some advantages to holding real estate in France through a company such as Mas des Morneau, including avoiding inheritance tax. It is a completely legal and commonly used method.

But while Morneau has owned the company for a decade and was named finance minister two years ago, the company was only added to Morneau's ethics filings on Sept. 22 — as CBC News was pressing his office repeatedly for information about the company and why it did not appear in his public ethics declaration.

Dawson's office says MPs are supposed to disclose any private companies they own anywhere in the world. Any private companies that are disclosed to the ethics commissioner's office are listed in the public registry of ethics filings maintained by the office.

Some assets must be disclosed to the commissioner's office but are not listed in the public registry, such as an MP's family home or properties used primarily for recreation.

Jocelyne Brisebois, spokesperson for Dawson's office, said the ethics commissioner can fine a public office holder if she believes they have contravened the law. Under the Conflict of Interest Act, fines can range up to $500.

Brisebois said there is currently no examination or inquiry underway.

Since 2009, Dawson has fined four cabinet ministers $100 each for not disclosing changes to their assets within 30 days as required. One cabinet minister, Conservative Peter MacKay, was fined $200 twice for failing to provide a description of his assets while Liberal Agriculture Minister Lawrence MacAulay was fined $200 in 2016 for failing to declare a gift he received within the deadline.

Oppède, France
The town of Oppède is located in the southern French region of Provence (Shutterstock / Pack-Shot)

Lauzon, described Morneau's failure to initially declare the company as "early administrative confusion" when contacted by CBC News on Thursday.

"The SCI is related to a family property in France and is of a non-commercial nature," he said. "It's simply a legal structure, or an administrative vehicle to own and maintain the house, according to French law. It is the mechanism through which the property is owned."

Morneau's own financial affairs have been in the spotlight in recent weeks as the opposition has increased its attacks over his proposed changes to the tax rules that apply to private corporations.

The Conservatives have been pointing out in question period that Morneau's proposed tax changes will hit small businesses, farms and professionals like doctors but not large companies traded on the stock exchange like Morneau Shepell, a human resources company formerly headed by Morneau.

The proposed tax changes also won't affect Morneau's company in France. Finance Department spokesperson Jack Aubry said the proposed changes will not affect private corporations owned by Canadians that are incorporated in other countries.

Morneau's previous ethics declaration included joint or sole ownership of six other private numbered companies, some of which are associated with property in Florida.

NDP Leadership Cullen 20160603

NDP MP Nathan Cullen says ethics commissioner Mary Dawson should make an example of Morneau for failing to declare his private corporation in France. (Adrian Wyld/Canadian Press)

New Democrat ethics critic Nathan Cullen says Dawson should "make an example" of Morneau's failure to disclose his company in Provence.

"The idea that the finance minister would have failed to disclose to the ethics commissioner and to all Canadians what businesses he actually had is incredibly worrisome," Cullen said.

"This is a big problem for me and I think it's going to be a problem for a lot of Canadians."

Cullen also contrasted Morneau's decision to hold the villa through a company, potentially saving his family money in the future on inheritance taxes, with the changes he is proposing to the tax rules governing private companies in Canada.

"Morneau seems to have set something up which makes it easier for him to pass on his wealth to his kids where they are proposing tax changes which make it harder for farmers to do the same thing."

Conservatives Economy Pierre Poilievre
Conservative Pierre Poilievre says it is important for cabinet ministers to disclose all of their assets. (Sean Kilpatrick/Canadian Press)

Poilievre said the failure to report the corporation in France calls into question Morneau's personal credibility.

"Here he is storming across the country, lecturing our local businesses and family farmers, calling them tax cheats and saying they should pay more, and meanwhile,, he just forgot to mention that he has a private corporation in France that owns his villa."

Poilievre said it is important for cabinet ministers to fully disclose what they own.

"Ministers are supposed to report their assets so that Canadians can judge their interests and potential conflicts. These rules exist for a reason."

http://www.cbc.ca/beta/news/po.....-1.4351933
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Oct 13, 2017 9:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bill Morneau’s French villa controversy couldn’t have come at a worse time: Editorial


As Finance Minister Bill Morneau continues to fumble, the stakes for the government and the country are truly high.



Just when it seemed Finance Minister Bill Morneau couldn’t be any less credible a salesman of Ottawa’s proposed small-business tax reforms, CBC News revealed last week that for two years, whether through inadvertence or something worse, the finance minister effectively kept secret a holding that provides his family significant tax advantages. (Adrian Wyld / THE CANADIAN PRESS)


By Star Editorial Board

Fri., Oct. 13, 2017


The revelation that Bill Morneau failed to disclose to the federal ethics watchdog one of his private corporations – a company that, in a dreadful bit of optics, owns a villa in the south of France – could not have come at a worse time for the embattled finance minister or his government’s foundering project of tax fairness.

Just when it seemed that Morneau could not be any less credible a salesman of Ottawa’s proposed small-business tax reforms, CBC News revealed that for two years, whether through inadvertence or something worse, the finance minister effectively kept secret a holding that provides his family significant tax advantages.

This news surely will not soothe the incorporated professionals who are understandably confused about why they, of all possible targets, have been selected as the first front in the push for tax fairness.

Rather, it feeds the narrative being proffered by federal Conservatives that there is something hypocritical about Morneau going after doctors and farmers rather than, say, large publicly traded companies like Morneau Shepell, the human-resources firm that the minister once ran.

In an attempt to get the largely sensible package of reforms back on track, Morneau is expected to announce a number of needed tweaks on Monday. But whatever good this does will no doubt be undermined in part by stories of the minister’s undisclosed company, its villa in Provence and the inheritance tax benefits they provide. As ever with this debacle, Morneau has made his important job much harder than it needed to be.

But the implications of this revelation go beyond the fate of the current package of reforms. Whether this was an ethical lapse or a more mundane oversight, whether Morneau sought to dodge his obligations or he simply holds so many companies that he’s unable to remember them all, this story feeds the lingering sense that this government is increasingly out of touch with ordinary Canadians.

As trust in government declines, so, too, does tolerance for anything that looks like entitlement or corruption. The public trust depends not only on integrity, but also on the appearance of integrity. This is particularly important at a moment when, by necessity, the government is looking to close unfair and ineffective tax loopholes and thus ask certain people to pay more. Yet the Trudeau government has been consistently careless on such matters. In the best case, Morneau’s failure to disclose is another example of this.

Perhaps, when you’ve travelled in powerful circles for much of your life, as both Morneau and the prime minister have, surrounded by players and influencers, it becomes hard to see how such lapses are perceived by people outside the bubble.


Perhaps that’s also why Trudeau failed to grasp the optics of taking a government jet to the Aga Khan’s private island for a family holiday last winter. Or why the government was so slow to realize that its cash-for-access fundraisers created the damaging appearance of privileged access.

This insensitivity is not simply a political problem. The resurrection of old questions about Liberal entitlement is dangerous not only for the party, but also for the country. For the essential project of tax reform to succeed, and indeed for government to be a force for good, Ottawa must seem to be worthy of the public trust.

When, on the other hand, more and more ordinary citizens come to feel their elected officials are out of touch with their concerns, tax reform is all but doomed, democracy is corroded and, as we have been reminded in recent years, demagoguery is nourished.

As Morneau fumbles, the stakes are truly high.


https://www.thestar.com/opinion/editorials/2017/10/13/bill-morneaus-french-villa-controversy-couldnt-have-come-at-a-worse-time-editorial.html
Bugs





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PostPosted: Sat Oct 14, 2017 12:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The irony, of course, is that holding the 'cottage' as a corporation allows them to avoid inheritance taxes.

That hissing sound you hear is all the hot air escaping from that windbag of hypocrisy, the Trudeau government.

It seems that the more they go for "fairness" in their policies, the worse they go off the track ...
Bugs





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PostPosted: Sun Oct 15, 2017 1:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some selections from the punditocracy ... first, Inkless Wells:

Quote:
... Come on, be fair now: Who among us hasn’t forgotten a villa in France, and the tax-dodging shell company we set up in our own name to manage it? ... let he who is without early administrative confusion cast the first stone.

Now the Trudeau government is in a bit of a pickle, because on Monday Morneau, who apparently still expects to be the finance minister by then, will meet a hastily-convened caucus of Liberal MPs to announce the terms of his retreat from the battle for tax fairness. ... And some of the more plain-folks Liberals may wonder what, at this stage, still makes Morneau the ideal standard-bearer for the tax fairness crusade, such as it is.
http://www.macleans.ca/politic.....o-join-it/


Now to Chantal Hebert:

Quote:
... Finance minister Bill Morneau is headed back to the House of Commons on Monday with a target on his back and much of the burden of his government’s declining popularity on his shoulders.

On Friday, an Angus Reid poll on voting intentions confirmed the ongoing erosion of Liberal support. It is no accident that Justin Trudeau’s government mid-term slump comes at a time when Morneau is taking a prolonged public relations beating over his plan to tighten the rules that govern private corporations.

Over the past two years, other ministers have been left twisting in the wind as a result of poorly conceived and/or poorly executed policies without the government taking a corresponding hit in voting intentions.

Think of ex-democratic reform minister Maryam Monsef’s electoral reform fiasco or, more recently, of House leader Bardish Chagger having to walk back her talk about overhauling the rules of the Commons.

But when it is the finance minister who is being wounded in battle day in and day out, it is the government’s core managerial reputation that takes a licking.

For if politics were a game of chess, the finance minister would be one of two pieces — the other being the prime minister — that is not disposable or at least not at less than prohibitive cost.

Morneau cannot be shuffled off to some other portfolio or quit without the move sending a loud signal that something big is amiss within the government.

Liberal strategists are hoping the imminent release of a revised set of proposals for private corporation taxation rules will take the pressure off the finance minister. There is a fiscal update in the pipeline that will feature some better-than-expected economic numbers.
https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2017/10/13/bill-morneau-feels-the-heat-as-liberal-support-slips-hbert.html


And from Postmedia's Melissa Lantsman ...

Quote:
... From the outright public disparagement of small business to selective feminism and a flawed understanding of history, this government has shown us that communications is the least of their problems.

As September rolled in, so too did Liberal tax reform. In the dead of summer the Liberals introduced a proposal to prevent “unfair tax advantages” for small business in this country. The proposal managed to paint the mom and pop grocers and hardworking farmers across the country as sneaky un-Canadian tax cheats evading a lifetime of paying their fair share.

If that wasn’t enough, last week we found out that if you were working a retail job in this country, the bullies in Ottawa wanted your lunch money — or at least the tax they think you owe. If you got a staff discount on your lunch, on your break, working at a Subway, then Ottawa wanted a piece of your sandwich.

This isn’t just a PR mess — this is part of a bigger issue.

It's Ottawa’s insatiable demand for spending that has the government’s sticky fingers in your pockets going after pennies on every dollar of your discounted lunch. It’s an astounding failure to connect with real people who are working hard to get by.

http://www.torontosun.com/2017.....er-another


The significant thing about these articles is the press is becoming disenchanted with our goofy PM, with his red polka dot socks. (His wife probably buys his clothes.) Morneau is making people long for Jim Flaherty ...
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 9:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The LPC needs a change of subject;
The Nanos rolling average had a double digit LPC lead which is down to more than half and every non Ipsos poll in the last few weeks has the LPC and CPC within the MoE of reach other.

Sooner or later those close to the Prime Minister are likely to demand a sacrifice of the caucus much like when Maryam Monsef was feed to the wolves to allow the Prime Minister to move forward with a system that secured his majority.

Could Bill Morneau get the axe over this?
We are already seeing the discussion points that the tax plan was poorly rolled out.


Last edited by cosmostein on Mon Oct 16, 2017 11:22 am; edited 1 time in total
Bugs





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PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 10:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Who have they got that's better than Moreau? Didn't they recruit him with a promise of the cabinet seat he sought? Do we imagine that all of this wasn't cleared with some tight little committee of the cabinet?

Best of all: shouldn't the next finance minister be a woman?

They may make another sacrifice to their idols, but we all know that this involves the Prime Minister as well. Didn't Justin himself learnedly proclaim that small business was just a way for the sharpies to avoid taxes? He may have set Moreau on the task.

Scheer ought to be asking those questions, and making it clear that the whole party bears responsibility, highlighting the attitude behind the policies, and getting that into the papers.

This is playbook stuff. Questions like that give stories legs.

What our new leader does in the next few days will tell us a lot about the leadership abilities of the winner of the 13th ballot.
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 2:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tories want Morneau to table documents he gave ethics watchdog



Kady O'Malley

Kady O'Malley

Monday, October 16th, 2017




Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may be satisfied with his multimillionaire finance minister’s explanation for why he didn’t put his personal assets in a blind trust, but the Conservatives want to see the paperwork that led the federal ethics watchdog to sign off on his decision.

On Monday, the party served notice that it intends to devote its second opposition day of the fall sitting to a motion calling on Bill Morneau to table all documents that he provided to Ethics Commissioner Mary Dawson between November 5, 2015 — when he was officially appointed to cabinet — and July 18, 2017, when he launched his controversial bid to tighten the tax rules that govern private corporations.

The debate is set to take place on Tuesday, and the motion could be voted on as early as that evening. Even if it passes, however, it’s not clear it would be binding on the minister; it’s phrased as a request, not a formal order of the House.

Here’s the full text of the motion, which stands in the name of Conservative MP Pierre Poilievre:

That, given accusations by experts that the Minister of Finance’s family business, Morneau Shepell, stands to benefit from the proposed changes outlined in "Tax Planning Using Private Corporations" and assurances by the Minister that he has abided by his Public Declaration of Agreed Compliance Measures with respect to his family business, the House request that the Minister table all documents he submitted to the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner between November 4, 2015, and July 18, 2017.

http://ipolitics.ca/2017/10/16.....-watchdog/
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 4:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
Who have they got that's better than Moreau? Didn't they recruit him with a promise of the cabinet seat he sought? Do we imagine that all of this wasn't cleared with some tight little committee of the cabinet?

Best of all: shouldn't the next finance minister be a woman?

They may make another sacrifice to their idols, but we all know that this involves the Prime Minister as well. Didn't Justin himself learnedly proclaim that small business was just a way for the sharpies to avoid taxes? He may have set Moreau on the task.

Scheer ought to be asking those questions, and making it clear that the whole party bears responsibility, highlighting the attitude behind the policies, and getting that into the papers.

This is playbook stuff. Questions like that give stories legs.

What our new leader does in the next few days will tell us a lot about the leadership abilities of the winner of the 13th ballot.



I'd be surprised if there hasn't at least been "discussions " behind closed doors in Ottawa about replacing Morneau in finance

but at the same time there isn't an obvious replacement in cabinet or caucus for him .


I'm also really left wondering why someone from his background and wealth decided to run for public office anyways ? surely he was smart enough to know there'd be issues and potential conflicts of interest .

he just sort of came out of no where and had never run before to my knowledge , it all just seems weird why someone who seemed to have it all would want to suddenly be in the public eye and would want there wealth in the spotlight
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 4:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
The LPC needs a change of subject;
The Nanos rolling average had a double digit LPC lead which is down to more than half and every non Ipsos poll in the last few weeks has the LPC and CPC within the MoE of reach other.

Sooner or later those close to the Prime Minister are likely to demand a sacrifice of the caucus much like when Maryam Monsef was feed to the wolves to allow the Prime Minister to move forward with a system that secured his majority.

Could Bill Morneau get the axe over this?
We are already seeing the discussion points that the tax plan was poorly rolled out.



it seems that today's announcement that the liberals will keep there election promise and cut the small business tax rate is just an attempt to boost there numbers and take the wind out of the conservatives sails as they've seen a boost from the controversy


this fall there seems to have been an endless amount of issues and misinformation about this government . there was talk of taxing employee discounts then word it was all a misunderstanding but the whole issue has yet to officially been clarified


personally I think this government is such a cult of personality based around trudeau himself that any member of cabinet is replaceable , trudeau is the face of this government in the minds of many Canadians and most wouldn't even remember half the cabinet ministers , so anyone could be replaced with someone else
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 4:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:
cosmostein wrote:
The LPC needs a change of subject;
The Nanos rolling average had a double digit LPC lead which is down to more than half and every non Ipsos poll in the last few weeks has the LPC and CPC within the MoE of reach other.

Sooner or later those close to the Prime Minister are likely to demand a sacrifice of the caucus much like when Maryam Monsef was feed to the wolves to allow the Prime Minister to move forward with a system that secured his majority.

Could Bill Morneau get the axe over this?
We are already seeing the discussion points that the tax plan was poorly rolled out.



it seems that today's announcement that the liberals will keep there election promise and cut the small business tax rate is just an attempt to boost there numbers and take the wind out of the conservatives sails as they've seen a boost from the controversy


this fall there seems to have been an endless amount of issues and misinformation about this government . there was talk of taxing employee discounts then word it was all a misunderstanding but the whole issue has yet to officially been clarified


personally I think this government is such a cult of personality based around trudeau himself that any member of cabinet is replaceable , trudeau is the face of this government in the minds of many Canadians and most wouldn't even remember half the cabinet ministers , so anyone could be replaced with someone else


Its not really the LPCs Promise though?
The CPC had deployed the reductions when they were in power, the LPC is just respecting the schedule.

Page 19; 2015 CPC Platform:
http://www.cbc.ca/news/politic.....-1.3264887


Last edited by cosmostein on Tue Oct 17, 2017 9:42 am; edited 1 time in total
Bugs





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PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 5:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cosmo is undoubtedly right, which must make their retreat doubly painful.

But it is a retreat. This is at least the second such retreat, and I don't know what you call their good ideas on marijuana, but it seems obvious that they'd like to punt on that question. Or bury it somewhere.

It's a little over two years until the next election. It's time to give him some serious opposition.
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Oct 17, 2017 7:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Morneau's credibility on the line

Liberals hopes for ‘reset’ on tax reforms mired in questions over finance minister’s personal wealth


Joan Bryden

Tuesday, October 17th, 2017



Finance Minister Bill Morneau speaks to members of the media as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau looks on at a press conference on tax reforms in Stouffville, Ont., on Monday, October 16, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette


Joan Bryden


Justin Trudeau hit the reset button on his government’s controversial small-business tax reforms Monday but the awkward spectacle of the prime minister sidelining his finance minister, along with mushrooming questions about Bill Morneau’s personal financial arrangements, suggests the political crisis roiling Liberal ranks isn’t over just yet.

Indeed, the controversy has morphed into a test of credibility for Morneau, Trudeau’s most important minister, the architect of the Liberals’ economic agenda and the chief salesman for the tax reforms.

At a news conference to announce that the government will belatedly honour its promise to cut the small business tax rate to nine per cent, reporters asked as many questions about why Morneau hasn’t put his substantial assets in a blind trust as they did about the tax measures.

Trudeau didn’t help matters by initially insisting on fielding questions directed specifically to Morneau, who stood by watching while the prime minister defended his beleaguered minister’s ethics.

“You have to ask a question of me first because you get a chance to talk to the prime minister,” Trudeau told one reporter before finally allowing Morneau to explain that he has followed “to the letter” the recommendations of ethics commissioner Mary Dawson for dealing with his assets and avoiding any conflict of interest.

The uncomfortable news conference prompted New Democrat MP Nathan Cullen to wonder aloud if Trudeau “is starting to lose confidence in his finance minister.”

“Certainly many Canadians are,” Cullen said.

“The rollout of this small business tax plan has been so badly botched, I think we’d agree that both the message saying to many small business owners you’re tax cheats and also the messenger in this case — somebody who is so inherently conflicted, and I’d suggest maybe legally conflicted — is causing a lot of problems for both the prime minister, his Liberal caucus and for this finance (minister).”

In the House of Commons, opposition parties zeroed in on the lack of a blind trust, plus last week’s revelation that Morneau failed to disclose a private company that owns a family villa in France, to cast further doubt on his credibility.

Conservative MP Peter Kent said “this extremely wealthy minister” seems to believe “he is above conflict of interest and ethics reporting rules.” His party’s House leader, Candice Bergen, went even further, accusing the finance minister of becoming “so arrogant and so entitled that he actually thinks he is above the law.”

Cullen sarcastically attributed the multiple controversies surrounding Morneau to forgetfulness.

“He forgot that cutting small business taxes was a promise that he ran on, he forgot he owned a luxury villa in France, but, hey, what middle-class Canadian hasn’t? He also forgot to tell us that his vast wealth was not, in fact, in a blind trust and he only comes clean when he is in a world of trouble.”

As for the reviving the promise to cut the small business tax rate, which Morneau shelved in his first budget, Cullen dismissed that as damage control in the face of the angry backlash that greeted the small business tax reform proposals from doctors, lawyers, accountants, shop keepers, premiers and even some Liberal backbenchers.

“When Liberals have totally screwed up a small business tax plan, when they have attacked small businesses while ignoring their wealthy friends, when they are backed so deep into a corner they have nowhere else to go, then and only then will Liberals honour their commitments to Canadians.”

Opposition MPs also kept up a barrage of questions about a now-withdrawn Canada Revenue Agency notice that employee discounts will henceforth be considered taxable benefits. While Morneau was not involved in that fiasco and the government has insisted it has no plans to tax the discounts given to retail sector workers, ongoing confusion over what other discounts might be taxable gave opposition parties more ammunition to question the credibility of the government as a whole and its claim to be a champion of the middle class.

Business groups, who’ve bitterly denounced the tax reform plans, were more charitable about Monday’s partial climb-down, welcoming the reduction in the small business tax rate and the promise of changes to the proposed reforms to be unveiled later in the week.

“It’s certainly an awful lot better than it was only a few short hours ago,” said Dan Kelly, president of the Canadian Federation of Independent Business.

Nevertheless, Kelly added that the business community will want to see the details of the changes and have tax experts analyse them before giving a thumbs up. There’s been “a bit of a trust erosion with the government” which makes the business community “a bit shy to react,” he said.

“We really need to make sure that what the government’s intentions are is actually the case when we study the proposals in detail,” he said.

“There’s no question it took a knock, it did affect the trust the business community has with government and with the ministry of finance, and it’s going to take a little bit of time for that to come back. But I think it can come back if the government is sincere and taking some new approaches.”

Perrin Beatty, president of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce, said the government appears to be doing “a dance of the seven veils” with its changes to the tax reform proposals and it’s not until all the details are known that its impact can be judged.

“At this point, everybody’s from Missouri. They want to see something that’s concrete,” he said.

Beatty said part of the problem with the original proposals was that the government understated the impact, essentially telling business people, “‘Don’t worry, be happy’ and what we heard from all the tax practitioners across the country was, ‘Worry.'”

http://ipolitics.ca/2017/10/17.....x-reforms/
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Tue Oct 17, 2017 9:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
Cosmo is undoubtedly right, which must make their retreat doubly painful.

But it is a retreat. This is at least the second such retreat, and I don't know what you call their good ideas on marijuana, but it seems obvious that they'd like to punt on that question. Or bury it somewhere.

It's a little over two years until the next election. It's time to give him some serious opposition.


Lets give credit where credit is due;
They are keeping a CPC promise and take a page from the Conservatives on the Economy is amongst the smartest things they have done in the last six months.
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Tue Oct 17, 2017 9:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:


Trudeau didn’t help matters by initially insisting on fielding questions directed specifically to Morneau, who stood by watching while the prime minister defended his beleaguered minister’s ethics.

“You have to ask a question of me first because you get a chance to talk to the prime minister,” Trudeau told one reporter before finally allowing Morneau to explain that he has followed “to the letter” the recommendations of ethics commissioner Mary Dawson for dealing with his assets and avoiding any conflict of interest.

http://ipolitics.ca/2017/10/17.....x-reforms/


I don't know if anyone saw this while it was going live;
But it was perhaps the most awkward political interactions I have seen.
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Oct 17, 2017 10:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Conservatives, NDP call for an ethics probe into finance minister's holdings



The Canadian Press
Published Tuesday, October 17, 2017 11:27AM EDT



OTTAWA - The opposition parties are turning up the heat on Finance Minister Bill Morneau over what he disclosed, or didn't disclose, to the federal ethics watchdog about his vast financial holdings.

On Monday, the Conservatives called for an investigation into revelations that Morneau didn't tell the conflict of interest and ethics commissioner for two years that he and his wife own a private corporation that controls a villa in France.

Today, the Tories pushed further, demanding that Morneau publicly divulge everything he has submitted to the ethics commissioner since the Liberals took office in 2015.



Finance Minister Bill Morneau
Finance Minister Bill Morneau looks on at a press conference on tax reforms in Stouffville, Ont., on Monday, Oct. 16, 2017. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette)

The NDP also called on commissioner Mary Dawson to investigate what they see as a perceived conflict by Morneau over pension reform legislation that could benefit the finance minister through shares he owns in human resources consulting giant Morneau-Shepell.

New Democrat ethics critic Nathan Cullen said the revelation that Morneau has not placed his financial holdings into a blind trust is evidence enough that an investigation is needed.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has maintained that Morneau has followed all federal ethics rules.

http://www.ctvnews.ca/politics.....-1.3635880
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Finance Minister Morneau owns a secret french villa ?

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