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Bugs





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PostPosted: Tue Aug 29, 2017 4:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The exodus has started ...

Quote:
Enviroshake, Chatham-Kent's 2017 Industry of the Year, leaving for Michigan with 50 jobs

By Jeremiah Rodriguez, Postmedia Network
Friday, August 25, 2017 5:01:43 EDT PM

A Chatham manufacturer named Industry of the Year for 2017 will close at the end of the year, its employees were told Thursday and Friday.

Almost 50 workers will be affected when Enviroshake Canada closes.

Part of its production will be moved to Michigan, said Marie Joseph, assistant general counsel for Atlanta-based Boral Industries, which owns Enviroshake.

“We’ve decided to stop the manufacturing of Enviroshake and focus on the Inspire line,” said Joseph. “Basically, Boral made the decision to consolidate the composite roofing into one brand and technology.”

She said Inspire production will move to Metamora, Mich. and be consolidated into an existing plant.

“Basically, the employees haven’t done anything wrong. It was a business decision to consolidate the composite roofing into one brand,” Joseph said.

In response to a question about buyouts or the opportunity for employees to transfer to the Michigan plant, Joseph said, “Right now we’re just closing it (the manufacturing facility) and the employees are going to be terminated.”

The Enviroshake line includes lightweight, durable roofing products made from recycled material. Manufacturing began in 2002 in the former Motor Wheel plant at the corner of Bloomfield Road and Riverview Drive. The product has been lauded for its use of recycled material and its ability to repel fire.

Two years ago, U.S.-based Headwaters Roofing Group purchased Enviroshake, and in May, Boral Industries purchased Headwaters.

Joseph couldn’t comment on how long the facility’s closure has been planned.
http://www.lfpress.com/2017/08.....-lose-jobs


And this ...

Quote:
“Liberals to blame” for GE Peterborough plant closure, 350+ lost jobs

Incessant delays and the Liberals refusal to support the Energy East pipeline have just cost 358 jobs in Peterborough, Ontario.

General Electric announced the closure of its Peterborough operations September 2018.

In 2014, GE had announced it would be adding 250 new jobs in Peterborough to build motors for TransCanada's Energy East pipeline.

But instead of a pipeline, GE and the rest of Canada got a series of artificial delays and excuses.

In January 2016, the Federal Liberals added even more hurdles and hoops for Canadian energy projects to jump through. Then Team Trudeau refused to vote for a Conservative motion to support Energy East.

This sent a chilling message to investors that Canada was no longer open for business.

Then Quebec’s Liberal government asked for a deferral of Energy East until the National Energy Board is "modernized" (with social justice nonsense). The Ontario Energy Board asked for a delay, too.

Maybe these anti-oil Liberal governments will notice how pipeline delays are hurting the entire country now that it's happening in a Liberal riding like Peterborough.
https://www.therebel.media/_liberals_to_blame_for_gm_peterborough_plant_closure_350_lost_jobs


These are industrial jobs -- the kind we should want to keep. I think manufacturers are reacting to the improved economic environment in post-Obama America as well as the Wynne government's craziness, but the point is, just as we are moving into higher power rates, higher minimum wages, and a carbon tax, the US is going the other way. We should be going the other way just to avoid losing even more jobs.
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2017 10:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hiking minimum wage could cost 50,000 jobs: watchdog


Increasing the minimum wage to $15 an hour could cost 50,000 jobs, warns Ontario’s independent fiscal watchdog.


The Liberals are planning a hike to the $11.40-an-hour minimum wage, which will jump to $14 in January and $15 in 2019.



By Robert BenzieQueen's Park Bureau Chief

Tues., Sept. 12, 2017


Increasing the minimum wage to $15 an hour could cost 50,000 jobs, warns Ontario’s independent fiscal watchdog.

The Financial Accountability Office on Tuesday released a six-page assessment of the Liberal government’s forthcoming hike to the $11.40-an-hour wage, which will jump to $14 in January and $15 in 2019.

“On net, the FAO estimates that Ontario’s proposed minimum wage increase will result in a loss of approximately 50,000 jobs (0.7 per cent of total employment), with job losses concentrated among teens and young adults,” the office said.

“The higher minimum wage will increase payroll costs for Ontario businesses, leading to some job losses for lower income workers,” it continued, echoing the concerns of the Ontario Chamber of Commerce and other business groups.

“At the same time, higher labour income and household spending will boost economic activity leading to some offsetting job gains.”


The FAO estimates the number of minimum wage workers will climb from about 520,000 to 1.6 million by 2019.

“As well, under a $15 minimum wage, adults and those with full-time jobs would represent the majority of minimum wage workers,” it said.

“By comparison, under the current minimum wage of $11.40 per hour, teens and young adults and those with part-time jobs account for the majority of minimum wage workers.”


The non-partisan office noted “there is evidence to suggest that the job losses could be larger” than 50,000.

That’s because “Ontario’s proposed minimum wage increase is both larger and more rapid than past experience, providing businesses with a greater incentive to reduce costs more aggressively.”

But the FAO cautioned that its analysis “did not consider other potential non-economic benefits of a minimum wage increase, including improving workers’ well-being and health outcomes.”

In a statement, Labour Minister Kevin Flynn noted Ontario’s economy is growing and can absorb the higher wages.

“Our economy created more than 30,000 jobs last month and the unemployment rate is sitting at 5.7 per cent, the lowest level in more than a decade,” said Flynn.

“Thanks to our strong economy, we’re now in a position to move forward with positive changes for workers in Ontario. We know the cost of doing nothing is simply too high — too high for workers and too high for our economy,” he said.

“Many leading economists share this belief. Studies written over the past number of years — including work done by the OECD, the Center for Economic and Policy Research, and the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives — lay out the long-term benefits of higher wages for low-income workers, as well as the economic benefits that come with alleviating this problem.”

Flynn argued that “low wages are bad for the economy.”

“We don’t believe that anyone in Ontario who works full time should be struggling to pay their rent, put food on their tables or care for their families — especially when the provincial economy is doing so well.”

https://www.thestar.com/news/queenspark/2017/09/12/hiking-minimum-wage-could-cost-50000-jobs-watchdog.html
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Sep 13, 2017 7:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wage warnings won’t stop Wynne


First posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 04:13 PM EDT | Updated: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 04:19 PM EDT



Don’t expect Premier Kathleen Wynne to change course because of Tuesday’s warning from Ontario’s Financial Accountability Office (FAO) that her minimum wage hikes will cost 50,000 jobs, hit groups like recent immigrants hardest and are an inefficient way to address poverty.

Because that’s not how a left-wing ideologue like Wynne operates.

Indeed, her government’s typical reaction to critical, non-partisan warnings it gets from independent officers of the legislature — such as the auditor general and the FAO — is to ignore them, or to attack the messenger.

That’s what Wynne’s Liberal government did when auditor general Bonnie Lysyk criticized its public pension plan accounting and “smart meter” program.

In the first example, Wynne spent up to $435,000 striking an “independent” panel that unsurprisingly agreed with her position on pension accounting, not the auditor general’s.

In the second, former Wynne energy minister Bob Chiarelli argued the electricity file was too complicated for Lysyk to understand, after she found the Liberals had doubled the cost of their smart meter program from $1 billion to $2 billion through financial mismanagement.

This from Chiarelli, a long-time Liberal politician trained as a lawyer, as opposed to Lysyk, a former senior executive at Manitoba Hydro who is a chartered accountant and a certified internal auditor, with a master’s degree in business administration.

So don’t look for Wynne to back down on her minimum wage hikes just because of the findings of the FAO in a report prepared by three of its economists.

While the Wynne government, in the person of former climate change minister Glen Murray, was quick to call anyone who disagreed with its often nonsensical policies climate deniers, the truth is Wynne and the Liberals are reality deniers.

That is, whenever they get advice they don’t like — even from independent, non-partisan watchdogs who report to the Legislature, rather than the party in power — they ignore it.

Or they simply say they disagree with the findings, as if Ontarians should take their self-interested and politically partisan word over that of unbiased experts who are the public’s watchdogs at Queen’s Park.

It’s because, on issue after issue, the Liberals’ minds are already made up, and they have no desire to be confused by facts.


http://www.torontosun.com/2017.....stop-wynne
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Sep 13, 2017 7:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Liberals' minimum wage increase has Ontario restaurateurs fearing the worst

By Jenny Yuen, Toronto Sun
First posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 06:47 PM EDT | Updated: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 08:09 AM EDT



mark
Celebrity chef Mark McEwan says the Liberals' minimum wage increase plan is "vote-baiting in such an obvious form that I just want to scream.”




A Financial Accountability Office report warns the Liberal government’s plan to hike the hourly minimum wage to $15 as of Jan. 1, 2019 will kill at least 50,000 jobs. Ontario restaurateurs and small business owners are vowing to fight back before those changes come into effect. The current minimum wage — 11.40 an hour — will go up by 20 cents on Oct. 1.

Mark McEwan, celebrity chef and restaurant owner

—What’s your reaction to the number of predicted job losses?

“It’s of tremendous concern for us because I go back to listening to (Premier) Kathleen Wynne talking about how this will be a boon for the economy. I thought that was one of the most absurd comments I’d ever heard, because everyone is already starting to raise prices ... Our industry has figured anywhere from 6% to 10% rise in prices.”

— Do you think this wage hike was a way for the Liberals to attract votes in next year’s provincial election?

“Everyone’s going to look at the person who got the $2 wage increase and they’re going to want the same thing. In a super competitive environment, it’s hard to raise prices. It’s vote-baiting in such an obvious form that I just want to scream.”

— How will your businesses be impacted?

“You start adding water to a pond, it floats all boats. Everyone is going to feel entitled and it’s going to drive wages up everywhere. It’s going to drive costs up everywhere and me as an employer, I have to look at it realistically and build my businesses to be more efficient with fewer bodies. Before I ever change my level of service, I would change my pricing structure and hope for the best.”

— What’s the relationship with small businesses and the government at this point?

“Canadian government is at war with small businesses. They look at it like they all have bags of money in our basements and that we can afford everything and everything gets leveraged on our backs every single time — when we’re the incubator for jobs, not the government.”

Aaron Barberian, owner of Barberian’s Steak House

— What’s your reaction to the number of predicted job losses?

“Absolutely no surprise. I thought the number would come in higher. You’re never going to cure poverty with a minimum wage increase. They need to lower their cost of living for people with modest means, not increase labour costs.”

— Restaurateurs are among the largest industries to be hit. How will it affect your business?

“There is the increase in paid vacation, going from two weeks to three weeks. There are paid sick days and under the new legislations, small business owners are not allowed to ask for a doctor’s note. There are many other costs associated ... Restaurants have already been hit hard this year on the province’s decision to raise tax on alcohol.”

— Who is most affected in your restaurant?

“Restaurants employ the most amount of people at minimum wage. All our servers — who are really salesmen — are making minimum wage, but they make gratuities that push them well over into the upper half of earners in Ontario, at Barberian’s. We see everyone across the board is going to be looking at a 30% increase in their wages.”

— Are you worried this will put you out of business?

“Barberian’s being a tradition in Toronto for nearly 60 years and having a good mix of clientele from all over the world, I will survive. I can raise my prices. I will cut staffing a little bit to survive. My fear is for my fellow restaurateurs, my suppliers who will face bankruptcy, my fear is for all the great employees. We’re all suffering from this. It’s a shock to the system.”

Shannon Stewart, owner of Covet — The Community Closet, Stratford

— Tell me about your staffing.

“It takes me 90 days to train an adult worker and so when I hire a student, I recognize it’s going to take me double that time. At $10.70 an hour (existing student minimum wage), it’s a good investment for me. But when it goes up to $14.10 (the new student rate in 2019), I’m just going to add an extra 90 cents an hour and hire an adult worker. I love my staff. I don’t pay them minimum wage, I do when they start and we have a performance-based system for the first 90 days, so the wages go up if you achieve your goal. But this bill will mean we won’t be able to hire people just to train them.”

— What’s your reaction to the number of predicted job losses?

“I am not going to be able to afford a student next year. I love the youth, the ability to train, their energy, but there’s no way. You’re adding 32% to my labour costs, and on top of that, there’s the payroll tax. My student job is essentially going to be cut and I think that’s the demographic that will be most affected. I don’t think people will be hiring students. They’ll find an adult that will work part-time.”

— What’s the ripple effect?

“I think we’re going to be working a lot harder. My other full-time employee and I aren’t going to have weekends off. Right now, we’re able to toggle because the student works every weekend ... I don’t see me being able to open on Sundays, which is a convenience for people.”

— What do you think of the way the government is implementing this hike?

“I think it’s going to be devastating to smaller businesses that don’t have the ability to raise their prices because of the market and I really do think you’re going to see mom and pop shops close.”

http://www.torontosun.com/2017.....-the-worst
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Wed Sep 13, 2017 4:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Its getting a little tight;
We are half way into September and Bill 148 (after committee amendments) is at the second reading and debate stage.

Assuming its not kicked back into committee and gets to a third reading the thing to consider is the House doesn't sit Monday or Tuesday of next week and they have a week off in October and again November.

http://www.ontla.on.ca/lao/en/.....lendar.pdf

Is the government expecting this thing to be passed before the end of the month and effectively give employers three months to implement these changes?
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Sep 13, 2017 6:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
Its getting a little tight;
We are half way into September and Bill 148 (after committee amendments) is at the second reading and debate stage.

Assuming its not kicked back into committee and gets to a third reading the thing to consider is the House doesn't sit Monday or Tuesday of next week and they have a week off in October and again November.

http://www.ontla.on.ca/lao/en/.....lendar.pdf

Is the government expecting this thing to be passed before the end of the month and effectively give employers three months to implement these changes?



its very rushed and isn't any examples anywhere , where a $15 an hour minimum wage has been implemented so fast

its unclear why it all has to be done so quickly and so rushed ?
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Sep 19, 2017 6:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the minimum wage hike will actually end up eliminating many jobs in poorer areas of the province according to this study )



Ontario's minimum-wage hike likely to threaten jobs outside Toronto area: study



Open this photo in gallery: THE CANADIAN PRESS


JASON FRANSON/THE CANADIAN PRESS



Justin Giovannetti

TORONTO


3 hours ago

September 19, 2017



Ontario's planned minimum-wage hike to $15 per hour is likely to threaten a disproportionate number of jobs in areas outside of the Toronto region, according to a new study from the Fraser Institute.

The study from the non-partisan think tank found that the closer a minimum wage gets to an area's average wage, the harder it becomes for employers to afford the wage hike without cutting jobs or curtailing hours. The planned wage hikes by January, 2019, will leave employers in Ontario's North and rust belt facing one of the smallest gaps between those two wages of any area in North America, according to the study being released on Tuesday.

"If your average wages are lower, if you're a lower-wage region, then a higher minimum wage is going to have worse effects on employment," said Ben Eisen, one of the study's authors.


According to the study, a $15 minimum wage will have less of an effect on employers where workers are paid more, such as highly paid areas in downtown Toronto, while employers in areas with lower prevailing wages will struggle to make up the difference. In 2016, the average wage varied in Ontario from a low of $24.15 around the Bruce Peninsula to $30.40 in Toronto.

Ontario's financial watchdog warned in a report released on Sept. 12 that more than 50,000 people could lose their jobs in the province due to the wage hike.



Most of the job losses would fall on young adults and teens while the number of Ontarians paid the minimum wage would balloon from about 500,000 to 1.6 million.

According to the study from the Fraser Institute, the relationship between the minimum wage and median wage is often expressed as a ratio between 0 and 1.

The higher the minimum wage increases relative to the median wage, the closer the ratio gets to 1, and the more likely there will be "severe adverse employment effects" from further increases, it warned.

The ratio for Canada's largest provinces is currently between 0.49 and 0.52, matching most industrialized jurisdictions. However, after Ontario's planned hike, the province's ratio will rise from 0.51 to 0.63 – one of the highest minimum wages in the world relative to the median wage a local economy can support. Most states that are Ontario's main economic competitors have ratios below 0.5. The study accounted for other wage increases that have already been announced.

What that means for companies in Ontario's lower-wage areas is that they will have to react "by looking for opportunities to automate where possible or by reducing the number of people hired or the hours they are hired for," Mr. Eisen said.



Announced in May, the minimum-wage hike is a central plank of a more wide-ranging labour plan from Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne that also guarantees extra vacation time and equal pay provisions for workers. The province's opposition parties and some businesses have criticized the speed of the minimum-wage increases, which boost the minimum from $11.40 to $15 in 2019, a 32-per-cent hike, in under 18 months.

Ontario will be the second province to adopt a $15-minimum wage, three months after Alberta.


https://beta.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/ontarios-wage-hike-likely-to-have-ripple-effect-outside-toronto-area-study/article36295069/
Bugs





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PostPosted: Tue Sep 19, 2017 8:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I live in an agricultural area where wages are low. The farmers who use whole gangs of immigrant workers are considering their options. The impact on the prices of locally grown vegetables is likely to be significant.

What it suggests to me is that they will be setting off a cycle of inflation, where prices rise, and other occupations have to get more money to 'keep up', and we all end up with more money but less purchasing power than we have now.
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Sep 19, 2017 9:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
I live in an agricultural area where wages are low. The farmers who use whole gangs of immigrant workers are considering their options. The impact on the prices of locally grown vegetables is likely to be significant.

What it suggests to me is that they will be setting off a cycle of inflation, where prices rise, and other occupations have to get more money to 'keep up', and we all end up with more money but less purchasing power than we have now.



I don't think the bigger chains here will be as badly effected as most seem to be doing well but its the smaller businesses I worry about , many can't afford the $15 an hour just to bring in some extra help , either they will be very short staffed next year or just hire some part time people instead

also suspect well soon see more self check outs and such , our grocery stores were already having a hard time finding any cashiers , is too many restaurants and golf courses here looking for staff , so the younger women would rather work there and make tips , so it makes logical sense to bring in some self check outs

whats ironic is it will be the younger people who were so excited to vote for trudeau and wynne who will soon likely be without a job , but maybe they don't care as pot will be legal by then
Bugs





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PostPosted: Tue Sep 19, 2017 10:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What happens is that the lower orders get a raise, those above them claim a larger raise because, after all, one of the things people 'get' with their job is a claim on elevated social status.

In other words, the supervisors have to get a raise just because there isn't a big enough pay gap between them and those the supervise ... and when the supervisors get a raise, the managers have to ... and so it goes.
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2017 5:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( another report is saying this plan will cost thousands of jobs but wynne doesn't seem to care )


September 26, 2017 4:14 pm Updated: September 26, 2017 4:15 pm

$15 minimum wage could cost Ontario economy up to 90,000 jobs by 2020: TD Bank report


By Staff The Canadian Press



In a new report from TD Bank, it says a $15 an hour minimum wage could cost the Ontario economy up to 90,000 jobs by 2020.


In a new report from TD Bank, it says a $15 an hour minimum wage could cost the Ontario economy up to 90,000 jobs by 2020.


TORONTO – A new report from TD Bank says Ontario’s plan to hike minimum wage to $15 an hour will cost the economy 80,000 to 90,000 jobs by 2020.

The findings come in an economic analysis released today by the bank that says that despite the job losses, Ontario’s economy will continue to grow but at a slower rate of 0.5 per cent annually.

The report says raising the minimum wage can potentially generate more benefits to society than costs but the rapid speed of implementation will increase the negative hit to employment.

The provincial Liberal government has announced it will increase the minimum wage to $15 an hour by Jan. 1, 2019 – with the increase phased in gradually and rising with inflation, as scheduled, from $11.40 currently to $11.60 in October, to $14 an hour on Jan. 1, 2018 and $15 the following year.

ANALYSIS: Kathleen Wynne’s $15 an hour formula for re-election

The new report comes two weeks after the province’s economic watchdog, the Financial Accountability Office, estimated more than 50,000 people could lose their jobs due to the minimum wage increase.

The FAO report said job losses would be concentrated among teens and young adults, while the number of minimum wage workers in Ontario would increase from just over 500,000 to 1.6 million in 2019.


https://globalnews.ca/news/3770319/ontario-minimum-wage-td-bank-report/
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Oct 11, 2017 5:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Public rejecting Wynne’s wage plan


First posted: Tuesday, October 10, 2017 10:41 PM EDT


No doubt Premier Kathleen Wynne’s brain trust thought raising Ontario’s minimum wage by 31.6% to $15 an hour in 15 months would be a big vote getter in the June provincial election.

After all, what better way to buy political support from minimum wage workers than forcing Ontario businesses, especially small businesses, to pay for Wynne’s promise?

However, a Newstalk 1010/Dart Insight and Communications poll released Monday suggests Wynne’s strategy may have already backfired on the Liberals.

In the wake of predictions by Ontario’s independent, non-partisan Financial Accountability Office that Wynne’s plan will cost at least 50,000 jobs, the poll of 814 Toronto residents taken Sept. 16-19 found 61% oppose the policy, with only 39% in favour.

Of the 61% against the plan as proposed by Wynne, 44% want a longer phase-in period. Another 17% want the minimum wage hikes scrapped entirely.

(A recent study by the Keep Ontario Working Coalition said spreading Wynne’s minimum wage hikes over five years could decrease job losses by 74%).

Of those Torontonians surveyed who are in the work force, 13% said they believe they will lose their jobs because of Wynne’s election promise.

Given that Toronto has been a political stronghold for the Ontario Liberals since they first won power in 2003, it’s reasonable to speculate opposition to Wynne’s minimum wage hike plan is even stronger across the province.

The Toronto results alone suggest increasing numbers of Ontarians have seen through Wynne’s spin that hiking the minimum wage by 31.6% over 15 months is a policy with all upsides and no downsides.

In reality, as is often the case with political promises, if something sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

This poll suggests most voters understand that if Wynne dramatically raises the labour costs of Ontario businesses over a short time, many will respond by reducing those costs.

For example, by laying off workers, or reducing their hours, or cancelling expansion plans in which they would have hired more workers.

Someone should tell the premier that there is no free lunch, and that there are always unintended consequences when you increase the minimum wage at the size and rate she’s imposing on Ontario employers.


http://www.torontosun.com/2017.....-wage-plan
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Fri Oct 13, 2017 10:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Its mid October;
Bill 148 is still in second reading and debate as of last week;

http://ontla.on.ca/web/bills/b.....il_debates
Bugs





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PostPosted: Fri Oct 13, 2017 12:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The election is less than eight months away.

As the election approaches, will it will be harder or easier to implement? It will undoubtedly create some negative publicity as well as some positive at the time. The positive news is already out there ... but if there are dramatic layoffs, it might have the effect of accentuating the negative as they go into the election.

I am wondering if the Liberals wouldn't just let the clock run out on this one.
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Fri Oct 13, 2017 2:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
The election is less than eight months away.

As the election approaches, will it will be harder or easier to implement? It will undoubtedly create some negative publicity as well as some positive at the time. The positive news is already out there ... but if there are dramatic layoffs, it might have the effect of accentuating the negative as they go into the election.

I am wondering if the Liberals wouldn't just let the clock run out on this one.


That's a tough question.

Patrick Brown and the PCs are fast-forwarding a lot of riding nominations;
That leads me to assume they have at least some background concerns of a snap election in spring.

Passing the 15 dollar minimum wage now takes away any incentive from voters that benefit to vote for you because the wage goes up to 14 before the election which is the biggest jump anyway.

You punt it down the line and state that you understand there is concerns about this plan and you want a fresh mandate to implement it then you force the hands of center left voters to go your way.

You argue the NDP can't win an election and you are the only path to a 15 dollar minimum wage.

You also avoid the risk of business issuing press release after press release in the months leading up to an election citing the cost of doing business in Ontario as the reason why they are leaving
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Wynne knows $15 minimum wage will kill thousands of jobs

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