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Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Sep 13, 2017 3:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is a really good thing. More of it should be encouraged. Every effort ought to be made to build on this act. [I refer to Wayne Long', the N.B. Liberal MP who announced that he cannot support the Government on this bit of tax 'reform'. It's on the previous page.]

Let's see how our leadership reacts.

What comment will they manage to get on TV about it?

How about in the parts of newspapers that are actually read?

And more important that both -- social media? What's happening there about this?

Or do they let the moment pass? Do they even know what to say?

I suspect we already know the answer. But let's give them 24 hours.
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Wed Sep 13, 2017 4:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Like anyone in politics the goal is to get re-elected.
Wayne Long was one of the beneficiaries of the Liberal sweep in Atlantic Canada as he replaced a Conservative MP and I would imagine he is receiving a lot of static.

This isn't simply a situation where the current government is undoing a Harper Era tax cut like Income Splitting or Reducing the TFSA;

Leaving operating post tax operating capital within a business has been an allowable practice for the last four decades and nine Prime Ministers.

Its a change that will fundamentally effect how every small to medium sized business has managed their capital for the last forty years and effect any long term planning for that capital.

I am still of the belief that the government can't possibility because this short-sided and that this will end with some other means of making business the Villain by raising taxes in another way but I have been proven wrong before.
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Sep 13, 2017 7:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
Like anyone in politics the goal is to get re-elected.
Wayne Long was one of the beneficiaries of the Liberal sweep in Atlantic Canada as he replaced a Conservative MP and I would imagine he is receiving a lot of static.

This isn't simply a situation where the current government is undoing a Harper Era tax cut like Income Splitting or Reducing the TFSA;

Leaving operating post tax operating capital within a business has been an allowable practice for the last four decades and nine Prime Ministers.

Its a change that will fundamentally effect how every small to medium sized business has managed their capital for the last forty years and effect any long term planning for that capital.

I am still of the belief that the government can't possibility because this short-sided and that this will end with some other means of making business the Villain by raising taxes in another way but I have been proven wrong before.



I somehow doubt Wayne Long is the only liberal mp against this policy change , the others might be fearful of going public . knowing promotions or cabinet positions will pass them by if they do . whatever reason this mp isn't worried about that and has decided to complain publically about this bad idea

I'm not sure if this change has to go to an actual public vote or not but I'm starting to suspect a lot of liberal mp's are not looking forward to that vote if it does happen

but it once again show the liberals don't understand businesses , they claim to be on there side during an election but then don't live up to there own promises and become anti business as a way to win over radical voters or low income voters on the left
RCO





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PostPosted: Sun Sep 17, 2017 8:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tories launch ad campaign against tax changes


As Parliament resumes, Trudeau and Morneau will face opposition questions for the first time on controversial small-business plans


Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks at the opening ceremonies of Hack The North, Canada’s largest hackathon, Waterloo, Ont., on Sept. 1. 2017.

Hannah Yoon/THE CANADIAN PRESS

Bill Curry

OTTAWA


25 minutes ago

September 17, 2017




The Conservative Party is launching a national advertising campaign this week to oppose the Liberals' small-business tax plans, an issue that is set to dominate the agenda as Parliament returns Monday.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his Finance Minister, Bill Morneau, will face opposition questions for the first time since the government announced the controversial package of proposed changes in July.

Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer will appear in his party's radio and online ads criticizing the proposals. The party has decided that the tax changes will be the Official Opposition's primary focus heading into the fall sitting.



Conservative Party Leader Andrew Scheer greets supporters at his shadow cabinet meeting in Winnipeg, Thursday, September 7, 2017. Scheer opened a two-day meeting of Conservative MPs and senators by hammering on the Liberal government's plan to end what it calls unfair tax advantages for the wealthy by changing elements of the tax code. THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods

Conservative Party Leader Andrew Scheer ,left, greets supporters at his shadow cabinet meeting in Winnipeg on Sept. 7, 2017.

JOHN WOODS/THE CANADIAN PRESS

"The Trudeau Liberals are threatening local business and all the jobs they create with big new tax hikes. But I won't just stand by and let the Liberals drive them into the ground," Mr. Scheer says in the radio spots.

The Conservatives are initially planning to spend about $100,000 to place the ads.

The proposed tax reforms continue to generate concern not just from Conservatives, but also from some Liberals.

New Brunswick Liberal MP Wayne Long, who has previously said he opposes the changes as currently worded, released an open letter to Mr. Morneau on Sunday that further outlines his position.

"Consultation is not about defending – it is about listening," Mr. Long wrote. "I share the same concerns of my many constituents, that we are moving too fast. We are not fully examining the possible unintended consequences of what is being proposed."

While the Canadian Medical Association is among the business groups opposing the tax changes, The Canadian Press reported on Sunday that some doctors who disagree with the CMA intend to release an open letter this week in support of the federal government's plans.

In an interview, Conservative House Leader Candice Bergen said the party has decided to make the tax issue the No.1 priority when MPs face off for Question Period this week.



Mr. Scheer won his party leadership in late May. The NDP will select a new permanent leader in October.

Mr. Morneau announced a package of proposed changes to small-business tax rules on July 18 and formal consultations will close on Oct. 2. The government says the proposals are aimed at making sure people are not incorporating simply as a way of paying less tax. Liberals say the measures are about closing "loopholes" that primarily advantage high-income Canadians. Small-business advocates counter that the current rules are long-standing tax practices that help businesses grow and warn the proposed changes will damage the economy.

The Liberal government fully expects plenty of questions on the tax changes. Government House Leader Bardish Chagger is also the minister for small business and has been holding cross-country hearings on the topic.

"We will be going through all of the information received," she said. "We really do want to get it right. That's why we are speaking to the people who believe they'll be impacted or will be impacted."


https://beta.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/conservatives-launch-ad-campaign-against-small-business-taxchanges/article36287146/
Bugs





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PostPosted: Sun Sep 17, 2017 9:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
Like anyone in politics the goal is to get re-elected.
Wayne Long was one of the beneficiaries of the Liberal sweep in Atlantic Canada as he replaced a Conservative MP and I would imagine he is receiving a lot of static.

This isn't simply a situation where the current government is undoing a Harper Era tax cut like Income Splitting or Reducing the TFSA;

Leaving operating post tax operating capital within a business has been an allowable practice for the last four decades and nine Prime Ministers.

Its a change that will fundamentally effect how every small to medium sized business has managed their capital for the last forty years and effect any long term planning for that capital.

I am still of the belief that the government can't possibility because this short-sided and that this will end with some other means of making business the Villain by raising taxes in another way but I have been proven wrong before.


This is Terrence Corcoran's appraisal.

Quote:
... The Liberals’ corporate and personal tax initiatives have no such objective. Instead of lower tax rates on business and higher-income individuals, it wants an aggressive tax collection system that would move more people into top marginal brackets and eliminate their ability to avoid such taxes.
http://business.financialpost......they-think


Scheer seems to be silent on the issue.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Mon Sep 18, 2017 9:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

There is a reaction -- Scheer is using corporate means to communicating with the folks, rather than rallying the crowd in the old traditional ways ...

It is certainly a move, and a smart one. I hope the ads are part of a larger series that éducates' the public by telling them the fact that the media are not covering.

Let's see how they do. After all, the target is as big as a barn.

Quote:
Tories launch ad campaign against tax changes

As Parliament resumes, Trudeau and Morneau will face opposition questions for the first time on controversial small-business plans

BILL CURRY
OTTAWA
SEPTEMBER 17, 2017

The Conservative Party is launching a national advertising campaign this week to oppose the Liberals' small-business tax plans, an issue that is set to dominate the agenda as Parliament returns Monday.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his Finance Minister, Bill Morneau, will face opposition questions for the first time since the government announced the controversial package of proposed changes in July.

Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer will appear in his party's radio and online ads criticizing the proposals. The party has decided that the tax changes will be the Official Opposition's primary focus heading into the fall sitting. [....]
https://beta.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/conservatives-launch-ad-campaign-against-small-business-taxchanges/article36287146/
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Sep 19, 2017 7:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

John Ivison: Trudeau doubles down on class war declaration to shore up progressive vote

The demonization of ‘the wealthy’ will continue. It is in the Liberals’ political interests to make some Canadians worse off, rather than trying to make life better for everyone


Planned tax changes ignite heated Trudeau, Scheer exchange




John Ivison
John Ivison


September 19, 2017
12:57 AM EDT



If Justin Trudeau has any legislator’s remorse about his small business tax hike, it is probably nothing compared to the woman now responsible for the worst public policy idea since sub-prime mortgages.

Theresa May, the U.K. prime minister, was in Ottawa on Monday, where she was forced to cope with searing heat and the fallout from the decision of her foreign minister, Boris Johnson, to lay out his own vision for Brexit.

“Are you in control of your own cabinet?” asked the gentleman from the BBC.

“You’ve got it wrong — your negotiating structure is a bit of a shambles, isn’t it?” queried his colleague from the Financial Times.

By contrast, the Trudeau government’s proposal on small business tax reform is a very Canadian controversy. Compared to the Shakespearean tragedy of Brexit, it is an amateur dramatic love triangle with two political parties pledging their undying devotion to “hard-working Canadians.”


The first question period of the fall session saw both Conservatives and Liberals unveil their talking points on the issue likely to dominate Canadian politics.

The lack of detail has allowed the opposition parties to define the debate — suggesting penury, ill-health and despair are set to engulf all who have hung out their own shingle.

“Why is the prime minister hurting people he claims he wants to help?” asked Andrew Scheer, the Conservative leader.
See Also Andrew Coyne: Dangerous days lie ahead for symbol over substance Liberals
Conrad Black: The Liberals’ tax reforms will be a national disaster
Colby Cosh: Virtuous vanguard or tax-dodging scum? Aspects of the tax-loophole war

The question allowed Trudeau to unleash his own barrage — that “the wealthy,” an undefined yet malign segment of our society, are dodging paying taxes at the same rate as the rest of us. “That’s not right,” he said, claiming his case is based on social justice and fairness.

What hard-working Canadians really need is a Babel fish, the fictional species from Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, to instantly translate political hogwash.

When Scheer talks about the mechanic who might go out of business paying new taxes to cover the “out-of- control spending of the prime minister,” he is attempting to shore up the blue collar vote who supported the Conservatives last time but almost certainly won’t be affected.

When Trudeau talks about it being unfair that “rich Canadians” are not paying their fair share, he is trying to shore up the progressive vote that backed him in 2015 but might be tempted to flirt with the NDP at the next election. It was noticeable that Bill Morneau, the finance minister, criticized the New Democrats over the weekend for failing to support the measures. Secretly, the Liberals will be delighted they are not.

As has been said in this space before, the road to victory in 2019 for the Liberals runs through Quebec. It depends on maintaining support of more than half of self-described left-of-centre voters.


Scheer can hammer away at Trudeau for characterizing “hard-working entrepreneurs” as tax cheats, but the Liberals don’t care.

They have declared a class war and seem prepared to lose some “blue Liberals,” if it means they keep the orange ones.

Trudeau is using intolerance for inequality to pit working class and middle class voters against “the wealthy.”

The muted reaction from those not impacted suggests they have no concerns about living in a country where enterprise and aspiration are derided.

The incongruity of a campaign directed by two trust fund kids who ran their own businesses appears to be lost on voters.

Scheer pointed out the Liberal front bench seemed jittery at the proposal “but that’s nothing compared to the back bench.”

There is nervousness and it will likely result in the proposals being scaled back to ensure they don’t include farmers and convenience store owners.

But the demonization will continue. It is in the Liberal party’s political interests to make some Canadians worse off, rather than trying to make life better for everyone.

Theresa May was forced to deny that Boris is driving Brexit policy from the back seat. But there is no doubt that Trudeau is directing this tax reform from the front seat — and it will likely help sweep him back into power in two years.

http://nationalpost.com/opinio.....ssive-vote
Bugs





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PostPosted: Tue Sep 19, 2017 8:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's interesting that the story weaves the Theresa May line into it. You can feel the professional envy that Ivison feels when he sees that Britain's reporters seem to be able to ask very pointed questions, whereas our guys can't -- or don't.

Ivison puts his finger on the Conservative problem -- the 'tax reforms' don't directly strike at the mainstream of the population. They are targeted at the managerial and professional classes, who are satisfied because they think they are getting gender re-engineering and carbon taxes. (It testifies to how politically confused our upper classes truly are.) And the blue-collar element isn't affected.

It says to me that the Conservatives should make the same points they are making now on tax reform, but show how the need for more revenue is the cost of the new benefits that the upper classes have so generously bestowed on those beneath them, in proportion to their social weakness.

The Liberal problem is ... the political right and left aren't as salient as they used to be. There is almost no 'working class' in the traditional sense left anymore. Those jobs go to immigrants. And the 'rich' are involved with government more than private capital. They make money but they no longer create much wealth. (The biggest new fortunes made in Canada were from government monopolies -- cable TV networks and the like. Next up -- licensed marijuana producers?)

The left-right people have been challenged by a new split that's active in the world, the split between globalists vs nationalists. As a country, we aren't much on nationalism, we're more like a real estate development, as nations go, but those are the forces out there in the world we trade in.

The deep issue, the meta issue, is that the Liberals don't have a clue about how to win in that world. They can't set policy for the civil servants in a lot of crucial areas. I don't know how up-to-speed the civil servants are. (Expanding trade -- globalism -- is the only area where the Liberals are continuing Harper's policies. More than most nations, we probably have to be interested in expanding our trade.)

While we twiddle, the US Fed is deciding whether to increase interest rates or embark on another round of 'qualitative easing', while China pretends it has done everything it can to stop the nuclear missile plan it is subsidizing in Korea. The world is a mess, and the Americans are threatening to rip up NAFTA. The media hide the biggest failures from us, and it is getting worse.

In Canada, we carry on as if Canadian politics existed in a box, separate from the rest of the world. We end up leaving the political decisions up to the civil service, albeit put in a form that seems to absolve the Liberals from responsibility for anything. We, as citizens, are supposed to watch and applaud, like it's a tennis match.

This is closer to the truth -- all the issues of the immediate future have to do with trade, currency values, and international corporations. Using the tax system to redistribute wealth isn't very efficient politics anymore. And using the force of law to make sure transgenders get the respect that they think they deserve can be positively offensive to our civil rights.

This stuff should have been ridiculed in best Churchillian manner as soon as it was presented to the public. But it will grow less salient in the politics of the future. At this point, you have to ask: What kind of loser are you if you need more of the welfare state?

Nothing points to the failure of genuine Conservatism like our collective silence on the re-engineering of our own children's genders! It says we have absolutely no tradition that we will defend.

But the task of the moment is to get the public on-side with a strategy to deal with the future in more general terms. The public has to understand its choices. It has to understand how Liberal policies are only contributing to our precariousness in the gathering storm. That should be Andrew Scheer's mission. Justin's government is dangerous.
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Sep 19, 2017 3:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( its like trudeau is one of those people who is so arrogant , that when they decide there right and doing something , they push forward no matter what , he and his advisors have decided this plan is a good idea and no amount of criticism is going to stop them )



Liberals moving forward with proposed tax changes: Trudeau



Kelsey Johnson

Tuesday, September 19th, 2017



Prime Minister Justin Trudeau holds a press conference in Ottawa on Tuesday, September 19, 2017. iPolitics/Matthew Usherwood



The Liberals will forge ahead with their plan to change Canada’s tax system, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said today, doubling down on a policy that has prompted widespread criticism from Canadians and several members of his own caucus.

“We are moving forward to make the tax system fairer, to stop the system that encourages wealthy Canadians to use private corporations to pay lower tax rates than the middle class,” he told reporters during a press conference in Ottawa. “But how we exactly move forward, what measures are in the legislation going forward, is directly impacted and affected by the questions...


http://ipolitics.ca/2017/09/19.....s-trudeau/
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Sep 20, 2017 7:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( there seems to be a lot of liberal mp's unhappy with this proposal , the way it was brought out , the fact they never campaigned on it specifically , the fact it creates class warware against rich vs middle income people and so on )



Liberal MP warns against 'class warfare' rhetoric on proposed tax changes

Justin Trudeau
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau holds a press conference at the National Press Theatre in Ottawa on Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017. (Sean Kilpatrick / THE CANADIAN PRESS)



Joanna Smith, The Canadian Press
Published Wednesday, September 20, 2017 12:05PM EDT
Last Updated Wednesday, September 20, 2017 3:07PM EDT


OTTAWA -- Not everyone is on board with the way Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has been going after the rich as he defends his Liberal government's controversial tax proposals -- and that includes some members of his own caucus.

The prime minister has been sounding defiant as he makes the case for eliminating tax provisions used by a growing number of small businesses, saying the system should not allow wealthy Canadians to pay lower taxes than the middle class.

Montreal MP Nicola Di Iorio said his fellow Liberals would do well to remember that they campaigned for everyone, not just the vote-rich middle class.



"We're not in a class warfare," Di Iorio said Wednesday as he headed into the government's weekly caucus meeting.

"When we campaigned, we sought the vote of every Canadian and every Canadian deserves to be treated with dignity and respect by its government."

Over the summer, Finance Minister Bill Morneau released the three-pronged plan, which includes restrictions on the ability of business owners to lower their tax rate by sprinkling their income to family members in lower tax brackets -- even if those family members do no work for the business.

Morneau also proposed limiting the use of private corporations to make passive investments in things like stocks or real estate, as well as limiting the ability to convert the regular income of a corporation into capital gains, which are typically taxed at a lower rate.

The proposed changes have sparked a revolt by doctors, farmers, small business owners and a number of backbench Liberal MPs, who have spoken publicly about the complaints they have been hearing from their constituents.

The idea of making the wealthy pay more taxes -- and the middle class pay less -- was a deliberate strategy for the Liberals during the 2015 election campaign, even though the specific details of the latest proposal were never part of the platform.


Still, some Liberal MPs said that has now gone too far.

"The messaging did pit Canadians against each other," said Winnipeg MP Doug Eyolfson, an emergency room doctor. "We did not want to do that and that's something we need to fix."

Manitoba MP MaryAnn Mihychuk said the Liberals need to show the business community they understand its concerns.

"I think we have to re-establish our relationship with business and that we're a party that understands the important role that they play in the economy," she said.

Prince Edward Island MP Wayne Easter, who chairs the House of Commons finance committee, said the messaging made people less willing to listen.

"The way the department rollout happened, it looked like there was an attack on certain people, that they were cheats," he said. "These people have done nothing wrong. It got people's backs up right away."

Trudeau, who has promised to let backbench Liberal MPs speak their minds, has said he welcomes the feedback.

Di Iorio said he believes his leader.

"The prime minister is being completely sincere when he says his MPs are free to talk," said Di Iorio, adding he has been under no pressure to stop speaking out.

Montreal-area MP Francis Scarpaleggia, who is the national caucus chair, said he thinks his colleagues have been reassured their concerns are being heard.

He also said he thinks the complexity of the proposals has led to confusion that has complicated the messaging. Some constituents have brought their tax accountants along when coming to vent about the proposals, he added.

"I think as time goes on and it becomes better understood, I think there will be more confidence in this proposal," Scarpaleggia said.

Easter said he does not disagree with the goal of the proposed changes, but he wants the government to study the potential impacts on the health care system, as well as the economy.

He said the government needs to know whether the proposals would help or hurt productivity, competitiveness and investment.

"I understand that hasn't been done yet and that worries me," he said.

The public consultation period on the proposed changes wraps up Oct. 2.

http://www.ctvnews.ca/politics.....-1.3598115
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Sep 20, 2017 8:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I watched a bit of video with Trudeau and Scheer jousting over whether the tax reforms actually hurt the very people that Trudeau claimed he was determined to help at one time. Trudeau responded with some exactly this kind of boilerplate, about fairness and blah, blah, blah. Scheer bounced right back, and asked his question a second way since it hadn't been answered. Trudeau repeated himself, almost word for word. Scheer got up again, and rephrased his question once again. This time, Trudeau used memorized answer as a springboard to go deeper into the bafflegab about fairness and preventing the rich from bringing ruin to the land by letting their greedy selves show.

I thought Trudeau looked rehearsed and ungenuine and smug on top of it. By contrast, Scheer looked serious and as if was actually interested in the answer. We understand this is a ritual performance, a performance meant to give us the impression that Parliament is still important ... so it hasn't got much to do with anything No politician is going to release information that reveals him/her to be wrong, incompetent or fraudulent. Particularly if it is filmed.

Scheer can probably handle himself, at Stephen Harper levels, in the House. I could criticize his strategy, but a leader gets to call those shots ... I guess. But these are only my personal feelings. I don't judge him on that.

I think where my criticism is broader is that he has to pick up his game outside the House. He has to learn that he can't woo the media. It doesn't work. And Harpers' approach -- freezing them out, except for selected times -- didn't seem to work, either. This is one of Scheer's big challenges.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Thu Sep 21, 2017 2:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:


The idea of making the wealthy pay more taxes -- and the middle class pay less -- was a deliberate strategy for the Liberals during the 2015 election campaign, even though the specific details of the latest proposal were never part of the platform.


As I remember it, they promised that the increased costs they were taking on to support their lavish offerings to the 'poor' -- most notably, the huge increase in the child benefits package -- would be paid for by 'the 1%'.

It was a way of saying that the recipients wouldn't have to worry about the tax consequences of voting Liberal. For them, it was $500+/kid/month, all free. This benefit was to be financed by the tax on the 1%.

This tax increase is sneakier and more devious. It comes on top of the tax increases on the top categories of income that have already been implemented. Most of us thought that these were the tax increases that the LIberals had warned us to expect. Now we find out that there are other rounds of tax increases coming. tax increases in form of changes in allowable expenses, etc. that only affect small businesses. Their effect isn't so clear because it will push business owners into higher taxed categories, for example.

This is a tax increase on top of the expected tax increase. How many more of them will there be? Do the Liberals still mean to give us a balanced budget in 2020? And do they intend to balance the budget (if that's what they intend) entirely with new taxes?

The Liberals are acting as if these attacks on small businesses are a 'promise kept'.
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Sep 21, 2017 5:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( there seems to be a lot of negative feelings towards the changes especially out east )


Rebellion brewing in N.B. against Prime Minister Trudeau’s proposed tax changes



CTV Atlantic
Published Wednesday, September 20, 2017 10:38PM ADT



Coalitions of business are aggressively targeting Liberal MPs, trying to convince them to choose their community interests over party interests.

Chartered accountant Chris Neal built his Saint John firm from the ground up with five people.

He now has clients across New Brunswick, but fears they could seriously be affected by the federal proposed tax changes.



“The message from the government is highly insulting,” Neal says. “To call these loopholes is insulting to somebody like me and to my clients. They are not tax cheats, neither is my firm."

Neal is just one business owner behind a coalition of over 50 New Brunswick businesses urging MPs to speak out in opposition to the federal government. They've launched a website called Choose Your Community. So far, MPs Wayne Long and Serge Cormier are supporting the coalition.

The opposition isn't just coming from New Brunswick. More than 40 organizations in Nova Scotia representing thousands of businesses are calling on Premier Stephen McNeil to oppose the tax changes.

Claudine Sweeney started Simply for Life in Saint John with her husband. They have since expanded to 35 locations across Canada.

“We've built this business and it finally took 16 years to get the point where we are really successful,” Sweeney says. “It becomes almost a punch in the gut to have more taxes and more changes."

Chris Neal agrees Canada's 45-year-old tax code needs to be changed, but feels a proper consultation period should be established.

"The way the proposed rules were presented and the speed the rapidness of it was shocking,” he says. “The income tax code that we currently practice under was enacted in 1972 after five years of consultation that began in 1967."

Speaking on behalf of the coalition, Neal says they simply want fairness and feel the negative consequences to these tax changes are not understood at the federal level.

With files from CTV Atlantic’s Mary Cranston.


http://atlantic.ctvnews.ca/reb.....-1.3599195
Bugs





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PostPosted: Thu Sep 21, 2017 9:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I should say at the outset that I do not know what the changes are, but it seems to me they are changes in the interpretations that affect how much income is to be taxed. I imagine this situation -- a corner convenience store. Such businesses are genuine family enterprises -- they could be open 16 hours a day, or more. The store could be open 80-100 hours a week, and sometimes two people may be needed. Teenage kids will mind the till at times, perhaps, and the wife another, and the father also does a turn.

How are the tax people to come at this? If they say that payment of family wages is a legitimate expense of the business, it means the profit, on which the business is taxed, will be lower. They can tax the income in the hands of the other family members, but the way our tax system works, you have to make about $250 a week before individuals pay any taxes, and they get taxed at a lower rate. So the effect is to shelter income -- particularly if the family members have not worked for the money.

Or they can decide that payments to family members aren't allowable expenses, with the opposite set of consequences. There isn't a middle way. By considering the money 'wages' taxable in the hands of the family member, it means less money is taxable. But refusing to accept wages paid to family will mean other people will work without being paid, in a manner of speaking.

But if the payments are not allowable, is it "fairer"? Wouldn't the kids continue to put in their shifts? Wouldn't the wives? Korean convenience store owners are not multiculturalists. They aren't going to fire their own kids and put a Help Wanted sign in the window.

But there are other kinds of businesses where this would clearly be used solely for the reason of avoiding taxes.

How much is it worth? If you had two family members on the payroll while they went to school, for instance, they could probably 'shelter' $15,000 to $20,000 worth of business income each. and a wife who might be paying a minimum of tax for 40 hours at minimum wage for about $25,000 -- $30,000. Assume such a business could split the incomes of a business in this way, rather than be taxed as a lump sum, it could split maybe $60,000 in income, which might be a big help for really small businesses particularly, but less significant for larger small businesses.
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2017 6:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tories accuse Trudeau, Morneau of 'sheltering' their family fortunes from tax changes


Janice Dickson

Thursday, September 21st, 2017



Conservative MPs are accusing Finance Minister Bill Morneau and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau of “sheltering” themselves from their own controversial tax proposals.

Conservative finance critic Pierre Poilievre kicked off question period Thursday with a statement about how the changes won’t affect Morneau or Trudeau.

“It’s a classic case of, ‘Do as I say, not as I do,’” said Poilievre.

“Our millionaire prime minister confirmed these tax changes won’t affect what he called his ‘family fortune’ and the finance minister made sure his billion dollar family business Morneau Shepell is sheltered from any of the changes,” he continued. “While the government...


http://ipolitics.ca/2017/09/21.....x-changes/
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Concerns mount over Morneau's proposed tax changes

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