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cosmostein





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PostPosted: Wed Aug 02, 2017 3:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Toronto Centre wrote:

Hows that economy doing there Sunshine? Is it first in the G20?


Sorry to poke my nose in here;
I understand the point you are trying to make here, I get it.

However when it comes this economic argument its such a double edged sword.

President Obama oversaw one of the biggest drops in US employment rates, GDP, GNP, and the Dow was under 8000 points for the first time since 2003 all within his first term.

Most Economists (rightly so) said that it was irresponsible to blame the President for an Economy that was trending downward when he took office (and it was) and you couldn't blame the high unemployment rate on him because its largely a trailing indicator (6.8 on Election day and hovered largely around 9 - 10% for his first term) the consensus was that it would take at least one term to deploy any economic plan to feel any significant effects.

I agree with that sentiment for the most part;
The Economy doesn't change instantly nor does it change quickly based on the will of government.

To credit Trudeau and the Liberals for the state of the Economy when GDP & GNP have been trending up since 2010, or the low unemployment rate which has been trending down since 2010 after a budget and a half of his economic policies is challenging.

Because if we hold that standard and we consider the US Economy which has seen unemployment trend downward and GDP and GNP tick upwards since November;

Then can the current President take the full credit for their robust economy?

Giving Trudeau full credit for the state of the Economy is largely similar to doing the same for the current US President because it relies on the same rationale regarding the economy.

So if I give a little credit to President Obama for inheriting a mess;
Perhaps you may consider giving a little credit to the last guys for not leaving one for the current Prime Minister? LOL
Toronto Centre





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PostPosted: Wed Aug 02, 2017 4:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well...there ya go inserting facts and smarts into the mix.

Who asked for that ! :)

You Sir are dead on correct. Much like many others lament the ups and downs of the economy on one Pres or PM, the answer is always the same.
They dont get results the minute they are elected.
Same went for Bob Rae (pls no more of him) and his tenure at the helm in Ontario.
The province was in a mess , yes it was made worse by him but it wasnt his fault.
cosmostein wrote:


Sorry to poke my nose in here;


naw...always the voice of reason. No apology necessary.



Quote:

Because if we hold that standard and we consider the US Economy which has seen unemployment trend downward and GDP and GNP tick upwards since November;

Then can the current President take the full credit for their robust economy?

In this case I think the words should be " In spite of " .
Quote:

So if I give a little credit to President Obama for inheriting a mess;
Perhaps you may consider giving a little credit to the last guys for not leaving one for the current Prime Minister? LOL

I was never a Harper hater and you are right.

Fact is, when one trolls in idiotic one offs, I sadly resort to same. .....and it brings down the discourse of this forum and that does not make me proud.
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Thu Aug 03, 2017 9:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Toronto Centre wrote:
Well...there ya go inserting facts and smarts into the mix.

Who asked for that ! :)


Sorry! :)

Toronto Centre wrote:
You Sir are dead on correct. Much like many others lament the ups and downs of the economy on one Pres or PM, the answer is always the same.
They dont get results the minute they are elected.
Same went for Bob Rae (pls no more of him) and his tenure at the helm in Ontario.
The province was in a mess , yes it was made worse by him but it wasnt his fault.


I don't want to derail the discussion;
However my only comment on Bob Rae was that he did get elected at the start of a recession which did hit Ontario particularly hard so to blame him for state of the economy in 1990-91 is unfair.

But to you point,
He certainly didn't help matters once he was in office.

Toronto Centre wrote:
I was never a Harper hater and you are right.


Cheers!
Bugs





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PostPosted: Thu Aug 03, 2017 12:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

When you guys quit being so friggin' civil ... it's worth pointing out that it takes at least six months for policy to produce measurable effects in the economy -- and that refers to changing the prices of capital (interest rates) which is one of the factors of production, and therefore intimately involved in economic decision-making. And it takes another three months for the statisticians to measure and record it. Taxes have a more diffuse effect, but it's just as certain in the long run.

The Trudeau management stinks because it is not paying the true costs of its policies. It is not borrowing to build infrastructure -- it's borrowing to pay for social benefits or otherwise subsidizing enterprises or services that people won't pay for! You only need to project the costs back on the present government and project what they would mean in terms of increased taxes to understand the burden we are putting on our children.

He is taking the state, once again, into unsustainability. That's why he shouldn't be on the cover of the Rolling Stone ... apologies to Dr. Hook. The regime he fronts for is stupidly destructive of our social environment because it fancies itself as doing something about the natural environment. As well as making out like bandits.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Tue Aug 08, 2017 2:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Are you good with body language? If 'so, it'll be enlightening to watch Justin Trudeau at the G20 meeting in Germany ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-AViwXZed5U

This is the real truth ... nobody serious wants to bother with him. He's just too vapid for people who have serious business to do.
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Aug 14, 2017 7:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( an interesting article in hill times about the PMO media strategy )


Trudeau’s atypical media exposure pushed by ‘most image-conscious PMO in Canadian history’


'We're very focused on reaching Canadians through a variety of different mediums,' says PMO's Kate Purchase.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has graced international magazine covers, including Rolling Stone and Sky magazine, and was pictured with his wife, Sophie Grégoire-Trudeau in the pages of Vogue. It's all part of the government's image-conscious media strategy. Mr. Trudeau's cover feature for Sky magazine, for example, was aimed at promoting Canadian business, says Ian Capstick.Photographs courtesy of Rolling Stone, Vogue, and Delta Airline's Twitter




By LAURA RYCKEWAERT


PUBLISHED : Monday, Aug. 14, 2017 12:00 AM



From Rolling Stone magazine to CBS Sports, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau makes a point of engaging beyond the usual media suspects covering Canadian politics, and it’s all part of a media strategy of what is considered the most image-conscious, communications-driven Prime Minister’s Office ever, say strategists.

“The Prime Minister’s Office has an innate understanding of how media and various mediums compliment, or perhaps don’t compliment, the prime minister,” said Ian Capstick, founder of MediaStyle and a former NDP press secretary.

“If we take a look at the list of outlets the prime minister seems to favour, seems to give a little bit more exclusive access to, they tend to be outlets that are well viewed in urban centres, they tend to be outlets and publications that perhaps cause other media to write about them,” Mr. Capstick said.

He added: “This is the most image-conscious Prime Minister’s Office in Canadian history.”

In June 2016, for example, Mr. Trudeau (Papineau, Que.) did an exclusive, in-person interview with the Daily Xtra, an LGBTQ-focused online publication, in what was likely a first, noted Mr. Capstick. It was aimed to reinforcing “a narrative that they have been very strong at putting forward,” he said, one of a prime minister who’s “open and transparent and collaborative,” and who—despite not having had a formal apology for historic persecutions of the LGBTQ community in time for that year’s Pride celebrations—is “still marching with you.”

The government has announced a formal apology will come before the end of this year.

Engaging “individual constituencies” on their ground is “critical” to the PMO’s approach to communications, said Mr. Capstick.

“There’s a reason the prime minister likes town halls,” he said. “There’s a reason the prime minister will do interviews that could be seen as a little bit tougher, for instance, because part of the Trudeau brand, part of the Trudeau magic, is to be seen as open, transparent, and able to take on criticism when it’s warranted.”


Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks to media in the National Press Theatre in Ottawa. The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

To be sure, Mr. Trudeau does the typical sit-down interviews—at year’s end, end of session, or otherwise—with outlets regularly covering Canadian federal politics, like CBC, CTV, Global News, the Canadian Press, The Huffington Post, APTN, Bloomberg, Maclean’s, The Toronto Star, and more. He’s used the National Press Theatre in Ottawa 10 times since becoming prime minister two years ago. Stephen Harper held seven press conferences at the NPT in the 10 years he was in power.

But he’s also engaged with media outlets, or particular shows, beyond the usual suspects, including exclusive interviews with CTV’s Breakfast Television, W5, CBC’s Metro Morning, CP24, P.E.I.’s The Guardian, and numerous interviews with local radio programs across the country, like Atlantic radio’s News 95.7 on the Sheldon MacLeod Show. He’s taken on unique interview circumstances, from taking part in a CBC special where he was interviewed by 10 chosen Canadians, to town hall talks with Huffington Post and Vice News, to taking a Vice News crew with him to exclusively cover a visit to Shoal Lake 40 in June 2016.

Internationally, he’s also talked to The New York Times, CBS’ 60 Minutes, CBS Sports, Rolling Stone magazine, Germany’s Der Spiegel, CNN, Comedy Central’s The Daily Show, Live with Kelly and Ryan, and Vanity Fair. He posed with his wife Sophie Grégoire-Trudeau for a Vogue magazine cover feature, and for Sky, Delta Air Lines’ inflight magazine. Mr. Trudeau has talked to Lonely Planet for an online article and Cottage Life magazine.

He also recently took part in The West Wing Weekly podcast, a show that discusses the TV series about the U.S. presidency, The West Wing, which ended in 2006. This podcast is hosted by an actor from that show, Joshua Malina.


“All of the various interviews are an attempt to show him in the continuous light of being accessible, in contrast to Stephen Harper,” said Tim Powers, vice-chairman of Summa Strategies and host of his own show on VOCM Radio.

Mr. Powers said along with the PM being comfortable engaging with media, Mr. Trudeau’s interviews with “so-called glamour magazines” are about “image inflation internationally” and building political power.

“Often Canadians will respond to seeing other magazines in other places that elevate our leader, we’ll take a sense of pride in that, it will make us feel like we are a player on the world stage because our leader seems to be so well regarded, or at least is earning positive press,” said Mr. Powers, adding positive international coverage also helps if “peer nations take a particular view.”

But such international coverage is not without risk domestically, in that it gets seen as “all sizzle and no steak,” said Mr. Powers, which is why he thinks the PM in turn does a lot of local media, town halls, and the like to “engage that criticism.”

Mr. Capstick said, as seen with Mr. Trudeau’s comments to Rolling Stone about Ind. Quebec Senator Patrick Brazeau, such engagement risks becoming “a point of negative interest within the Canadian media, and particularly the Canadian political intelligentsia.”

Mr. Capstick said this PMO has also shown as tendency to use communications to tackle problems. For example, he cited the prime minister’s January tweet about all refugees being welcome in Canada, something that at the time earned him accolades but today has been blamed by some for an influx some cities are struggling to cope with. While it solved “surface level tensions” at the time, Mr. Capstick said a policy-driven rather than a communications fix could have solved the “underlying” issues.

“There’s a lot of people in the world of lobbying and in the world of public affairs that quite rightly suggest that if you can make something a communications problem for the existing federal government, it most certainly becomes then an obsession and something that the government wants to respond to,” he said.

Mr. Harper developed a reputation over his tenure as being relatively closed-off to the Parliamentary Press Gallery and was noted for taking strict control over how, and how much, he engaged.

But Mr. Powers noted that Mr. Harper also spent time “working different media strands,” such as reaching out to ethnic media organizations across the country or talking hockey with Sports Illustrated.

“[Mr. Trudeau has] continued that and tried to be even more diverse and hit more communities and recognize that there’s no one specific gathering place for Canadians anymore, and when you’re driving certain messages, you’ve got to go to different places,” he said.


Mr. Trudeau speaks to Hill media outside the Senate Chamber in Centre Block, accompanied by Canada’s next governor general Julie Payette. The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

While there’s plenty that’s different about how Mr. Trudeau engages with media as prime minister compared Mr. Harper, it’s not entirely new. The prime minister will still limit questions at press conferences, both on the Hill and while travelling.

Just as the Harper government was described as being selective in which media to engage with, and when, so to does the Trudeau government—albeit, more frequently and in different ways.

Mr. Powers noted Mr. Harper also did much to communicate directly with Canadians, like his PMO-produced weekly video roundup 24 Seven.

“Trudeau seems to be doing both direct-to-market and using the filter [of media] because he figures he can get some value from the filter. So he’s different in that regard, but I think each of them has a formula that they applied based on where they think their strengths and weaknesses are,” he said.

In an emailed response to a request from The Hill Times to discuss the PMO’s media strategy, communications director Kate Purchase said: “We’re very focused on reaching Canadians through a variety of different mediums, and that includes a wide variety of news sources and outlets.”

“Canadians aren’t getting their news from just one source anymore, and often it’s a mix of kinds of outlets. We want to talk to Canadians in every part of the country, and that permeates our approach to social media, to physical events, to the kinds of media outlets we engage with,” she said.

The Trudeau government’s engagement with media has also extended beyond the prime minister himself, as notably in the case of a recent profile of his chief of staff Katie Telford in Chatelaine magazine, for which the publication was granted unique access.

A profile like that “shows that the prime minister lives the brand, and that brand is empowering good leaders regardless of gender,” said Mr. Powers.

It establishes Mr. Trudeau as progressive, highlights a capable working mother at the top levels of government, and helps build connections with an audience the Liberals are after, “younger voters, millennials, some gen Xers,” he said.

Mr. Capstick said this PMO sees “each and every one of the political actors within the prime minister’s sphere as being critical to how the narrative is being put forward,” from his principal secretary Gerald Butts engaging on Twitter, to Ms. Telford being profiled in a magazine. By comparison, the Harper PMO stuck to old adage that staffers stay behind the scenes.

“These are conscious communications choices,” he said. “It’s not dissimilar to when Madame Sophie Grégoire-Trudeau goes out and chooses a specific charity or decides to give a speech at an event, or reaches out on a particular policy issue.”

Elizabeth Gray-Smith, a senior content strategist with Bluesky Strategy Group, said she thinks the Trudeau government is “definitely more media savvy” than the previous one, and “appreciates the media’s role in democracy” and are using their strengths to leverage it.

“They’re smart about it. They’re not pitching stories or accepting interviews just because. They look at numbers. They know who they’re reaching. … Everything is calculated,” she said.

Ms. Gray-Smith, a Liberal, said the Trudeau government’s media strategy is to “engage with media again,” and using a “Storifyed approach” to showcase the government’s policies.

“I really believe it’s the most connected government that we’ve seen. They’re using these stories to then pump the progressive movement through all channels where the voters are, and they’re on Facebook, they’re on Twitter, they’re on Instagram, you name it. These stories are then moving along and it gives them just more traction,” she said.

“They’re not just profiles on Trudeau the man. These stories are about what he believes in and the policies he’s passionate about. So to get people talking everywhere, not just in the States, but around the globe, it benefits us in moving it forward internationally.”

Based on recent feedback from her American cousins, Ms. Gray-Smith said the Rolling Stone profile, for example, has bolstered progressives south of the border, and can benefit Canadians by building support for policies that impact us all.

“We can’t just talk about climate change just here, because climate change affects everyone,” she said.

Mr. Capstick noted there’s also plenty of “cause and effect” in the way in which the Trudeau government engages.

“Again, that’s part of the strategy that the director of communications [Kate Purchase] and the entire team in the Prime Minister’s Office are putting forward. They are choosing these particular media interviews because then that provokes other media articles about them, including this one,” said Mr. Capstick.

“For him to go on The West Wing podcast … it’s not really about the listeners of that particular podcast, but it’s actually much more about the media that he’s going to receive in Toronto, Vancouver, Ottawa, for doing that,” he said.

http://www.hilltimes.com/2017/.....sts/116002
Bugs





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PostPosted: Mon Aug 14, 2017 10:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's unfortunate that some of his posed pictures couldn't be posted with the article because it's uncanny how, in this exercise of the imagination, all these pictures show Whippersnapper Trudeau trying to become ... what Donald Trump already is. A corporte honcho and big success.

The Rolling Stone cover is the least imaginative of them. It portrays him leaning against a desk. in a rich, clubby setting ... wearing a radiantly white shirt, his tie loosened. It's like he's just finished work, and is ready to have a beer -- or maybe a scotch? -- and shoot some pool.

Trudeau is an actor as well as model, after all, and we can see some of that professionalism in these shots. He almost grunts at us, trying to project a stern determination. No trace of a smile, though his lips are pouty. Why can't he be our lPresident? is traced out in the negative space.

It's corporate, it's serious, and its also for women. It shows Trudeau as a corporate dude who 'has it all'. The 'money-for-nothing-and-chicks-for-free' guy.

The next is Sky, which looks like an airline magazine -- which is where clients definitely buy space and maybe even provide their own copy -- to deliver your message to a different kind of people. This time, Trudeau is seated backwards on a conspicuously old library chair, in full man-spreading position, skinny little arms overlapped across the back of the chair. In the background, part of a huge Canadian flag ... just enough to notice ... he's in a blue shirt with sleeves rolled up above the elbow ... blue slacks, a slight smirk on his face. This is the corporate guy off work, with no Fight Club to go to ... slightly bored and ready to go, sitting in the waiting room of post-modernity.

(I am surprised this is so low-budget looking.)

The third is a picture of Justin staring into the eyes of what is possibly transsexual hair model ... no, no I jest. (The thought of this picture actually occurring in the real life of the guy we expect to face-off with Putin ... well, it makes my skin crawl.) Words fail me ... let me just stifle the nausea ... it shows our PM looking adoringly at his wife, she radiantly clothed and coiffed, in his arms, while she holds her head back, barely keeping their noses from touching. You can almost hear the words: "I would have more time for this if only I weren't so overburdened!"

This is like a dish of pure sentiment, and probably the most manipulative of all. Justin, the leader of the nation, begging for sex ... please, Sophie, please, please, please ...

What strikes me is that all three pictures of 'images' of our PM, all of, in varying degrees, pictures of what he wishes he were. This is an extreme narcissist in a narcissist age, with a narcissism budget! What he wants us to think is he's a 'corporate guy', but he has built no organization. He wants us to think he's a perfect husband ... but he's only pussy-whipped.
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Justin Trudeau: The Northern Star

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