Home FAQ Search Memberlist User Groups Register Login   

BloggingTories.ca Forum IndexBloggingTories.ca Forum Index
    Index     FAQ     Search     Register     Login         JOIN THE DISCUSSION - CLICK HERE      

*NEW* Login or register using your Facebook account.

Not a member? Join the fastest growing conservative community!
Membership is free and takes 15 seconds


CLICK HERE or use Facebook to login or register ----> Connect



Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 10, 11, 12, 13, 14  Next  

Post new topic   Reply to topic Page 11 of 14
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 6287
Reputation: 229.2
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Fri Jun 23, 2017 7:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wynne wildly unpopular inside and outside Ontario: Poll

By Antonella Artuso, Toronto Sun
First posted: Thursday, June 22, 2017 10:26 AM EDT | Updated: Thursday, June 22, 2017 03:23 PM EDT



TORONTO - Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne holds the unfortunate distinction of being the most unpopular premier both inside and outside her province, a Mainstreet/Postmedia polls finds.

Mainstreet Research polled people across the country to determine the approval ratings of premiers in their provinces and among Canadians in general.

Of all 10 premiers, the embattled Wynne has the lowest approval rating in her home province with only 19% of Ontarians expressing support for her, and a full 70% unhappy with the job she’s doing.

Across Canada, 38% approve of Wynne and 48% disapprove, the highest disapproval rating among all premiers, although Quebec’s Philippe Couillard follows closely behind with a 47% negative rating, Mainstreet Research president Quito Maggi said.

As the premier of the most populous province, Wynne is subject to far more media scrutiny – including negative coverage - than other provincial leaders, but that alone doesn’t fully explain her poor poll showing nationally.

“She’s taken the lead on a number of unpopular files from carbon tax to Energy East and other major national issues, where she’s really been on the forefront of it and gotten the national coverage,” Maggi said. “It’s not the same issues that are driving her disapproval (rates) at home.”

Her approval rating has risen to 19% from 16% when last checked, up from 14% mid-2016, he said.

“She’s moving in the right direction but the context is she’s been below 20% for over a year, and the disapproval continues to increase,” Maggi said. ”Out of that 19%, just 3% is strong approval.”

High hydro rates and hydro privatization are issues in Ontario, but even more importantly was the length of time it took for her to acknowledge publicly that electricity bills had become a significant burden on Ontarians, so that she was perceived “as out of touch,” Maggi said.

Couillard and Alberta’s Rachel Notley are the most popular premiers among Canadians, although their rating drops in their own provinces, the Mainstreet poll reveals.

Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister proved the most popular premier in his own province with an “extended honeymoon” approval rating of 53%, Maggi said.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has an approval rating nationally of 54%, led by strong support in Quebec, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick.

Mainstreet surveyed 5,250 Canadians between June 12 to 15, and the results are considered accurate within a margin of 1.35% to 5.65% depending on the jurisdiction.

http://www.torontosun.com/2017.....tario-poll
cosmostein





Joined: 04 Oct 2006
Posts: 7436
Reputation: 297.4
votes: 21
Location: The World

PostPosted: Fri Jun 23, 2017 1:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:
cosmostein wrote:
I think we are past the point of no return on the OLP selecting a new leader;

Even with the same quickie timeline that was used after McGunity resigned you would need four months and why would you want your best and brightest to be fundraising for their personal campaigns when your primary opposition just outfundraised you 3:1 in the last year?


there is still options to replace her , she could resign today and the liberal caucus could simply select its own leader from the current caucus and not have a leadership race due to lack of time and other candidates . they'd just have to agree on who the new leader would be .

its clear the ontario liberals are in deep trouble and I don't see any realistic pathway forward with wynne , even if she holds all the liberal seats in the 416 which is unlikely she's going to lose most of the others and be lucky to beat the ndp , 3rd place is a very realistic option as things stand today


How confident are you that the Liberal Caucus would have the interest in lining up behind a leader? That there would be no in-fighting between the folks who were loyal to Wynne and those who demanded her ouster?

In a perfect world;
Sure.

You hand a blindfold and a cigarette to someone like Eric Hoskins who loses in June but maybe loses less than Wynne may have?

Then you hold another leadership race in 2019 where I would imagine you will see a few Federal Liberals looking to join ranks of a fairly lean party that they can build in their own imagine.

It just seems so disjointed to do it that way;
Unless the OLP really feels they can win with a new leader they pull from caucus.
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 6287
Reputation: 229.2
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Mon Jun 26, 2017 7:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The most popular political Facebook group in Ontario targets Kathleen Wynne

Its Facebook page has amassed more followers than Ontario PCs, Liberals and NDP combined

By Mike Crawley, CBC News Posted: Jun 24, 2017 5:00 AM ET| Last Updated: Jun 24, 2017 5:00 AM ET

Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne at a news conference at Amazon's Canadian headquarters in downtown Toronto.


A new political force in Ontario is exploding on social media, with defeating Kathleen Wynne and the Liberals in the 2018 election as its key goal.

It's called Ontario Proud, and its Facebook page has amassed nearly 145,000 followers — more than the provincial Liberals, PCs and NDP combined.

Created little more than a year ago, it has become the province's biggest online political group.

"Goes to show you that Ontarians are really fed up with the status quo, and they want change," said Ontario Proud's founder, Jeff Ballingall.
■Wynne's re-election plan: campaigning from the left
■Ontario election 2018: Here's what's new

"I'm trying to showcase that people have a right to feel grievance and outrage that they're essentially being trampled on by this government that's so out of touch," Ballingall said Friday in an interview with CBC Toronto.

Ontario's Proud's Facebook page is a mix of mainstream media news stories, anti-Liberal memes and shareable videos made by Ballingall. The posts primarily target Wynne, but include regular smackdowns of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, with an overarching theme against government waste, tax hikes and mismanagement.



"No one [in Ontario] is doing what we're doing online," said Ballingall. "We can say and do things that traditional media and political parties can't. We can be funny, we can be a little more hard-hittting."


He said the content received 3.2 million engagements in the past month and believes it's succeeding "because we're talking about hydro and jobs and pocketbook, kitchen-table issues."

How social media will influence the campaign

Ontario Proud's large following is another example of how a growing number of people primarily access political news via Facebook groups, and it may give a taste of how social media will influence the 2018 provincial campaign.

"If you see your uncle, your cousin or your neighbour sharing a political message, you're way more likely to engage with it than a television commercial," said Ballingall. "It's much less passive."

Ballingall, 31, established Ontario Proud last year. He grew up in Sarnia, has worked on Parliament Hill as a Conservative political staffer, at Toronto city hall for Coun. John Parker, and for the strategic consulting firm Navigator. He acknowledges he is a small-c conservative but says the group is non-partisan.

Jeff Ballingall
Jeff Ballingall, the founder of Ontario Proud. (Courtesy of Jeff Ballingall)

Despite the site's staunchly small-government, right-of-centre tone, Ontario Proud will encourage "strategic" voting in 2018, by telling its audience which party's candidate it believes has the best chance of defeating the Liberals in each constituency. (Ballingall, who lives in the Toronto riding of Beaches-East York, says he will vote NDP.)

What's not clear is whether Ontario Proud's posts are actually influencing people to turn against Wynne and the Liberals or merely attracting followers who've already made up their minds.

Some members voted Liberal

​A survey of its Facebook community indicated 20 per cent voted Liberal in the last election, according to Ballingall.

"I honestly think we're making a huge difference," he said. "We are reaching people from all age groups and predominantly women."

Non-partisan interest groups have been a key force in recent Ontario elections. The most influential has been the Working Families Coalition, the union-funded agency whose mission has been to keep the PCs out of power through attack ads. The group spent $2.5 million in the 2014 campaign.

By contrast, Ontario Proud is working on a shoestring. Ballingall says the venture has cost just $5,000 so far.


Ontario Proud's current activities are just online but Ballingall says it has collected a "war chest" and will spend money on political advertising closer to the June 7 election.

CBC Toronto asked Wynne's office about Ontario Proud. A spokesperson responded: "We're not going to comment on a website that supports profane, hateful and abusive comments."

Comments about Wynne that were visible Friday on the Ontario Proud Facebook page included:
■"That ugly nasty greedy no good money grubbing snot faced witch" (Debbie Berube).
■"The ugliest human dyke who ever existed" (Darryl Mckee).
■"I'm surprised that no one has shot her but maybe the bullets cost to much" (Thomas Duncan).
■"The most lying, cheating, selfish, self centred, uncaring, mean ugly bitch that ever was in power in Ontario" (Barry Howard).

"I try my best to police comments and put filters up but I can't obviously catch everything," said Ballingall.

Ontario Proud is incorporated as a non-profit, with Ballingall, Toronto lawyer Ryan O'Connor and tech entrepreneur Chris Spoke as its directors.

Facebook page likes (as of June 2017):
■Ontario Proud: 143, 817.
■Kathleen Wynne: 55, 090.
■Ontario PC Party: 55, 431.
■Ontario NDP: 19, 224.
■Ontario Liberal Party: 9, 152.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/.....-1.4173817
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 6287
Reputation: 229.2
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Mon Jul 03, 2017 8:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( wynne might not even be able to count on winning Toronto next election , its that bad )


Ontario's Libs losing their Toronto stronghold: Poll

By Jane Stevenson, Postmedia Network
First posted: Sunday, July 02, 2017 06:23 PM EDT | Updated: Sunday, July 02, 2017 06:31 PM EDT


Ontario’s Liberals would lose their stronghold in Toronto to the Progressive Conservatives if an election was held now, according to a Forum Research poll.

Of those “decided and leaning,” the PCs would attract 38% of the vote in Toronto compared to 32% for the Liberals, says the poll. Voters go to the polls next June to select a new provincial government.

The NDP could only count on the support of 21%, the Greens 6% and 3% of respondents indicated they would vote for another party.

Of the 1,040 Toronto voters surveyed, those most likely to support the Conservatives were men earning $40,000-$100,000 — with some college or university — and living in North York, Etobicoke or Scarborough.

The majority of Liberal supporters include those 34 and younger and 65 and older. They are the least wealthy, earning $20,000-$40,000, the least educated and living in the former City of Toronto or North York.

“The Liberal decline in Toronto is consistent with what we’ve seen province wide,” said Lorne Bozinoff, president of Forum Research.

Bozinoff added it’s uncertain if Patrick Brown’s Conservatives are gaining real momentum. But as next year’s election grows closer and the Tories unveil their policies, pollsters will be able to get a better sense of voter support for the PCs.

The poll — conducted June-20-22 — is considered accurate within 3%, 19 times out of 20.

http://www.torontosun.com/2017.....ghold-poll
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 6287
Reputation: 229.2
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Wed Jul 26, 2017 7:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( things might not get any better for wynne as she has to testify at an upcoming trial )


Wynne: 'I will testify' at Sudbury byelection trial


The Canadian Press

First posted: Tuesday, July 25, 2017 11:45 AM EDT | Updated: Tuesday, July 25, 2017 04:28 PM EDT



Kathleen Wynne will testify as a Crown witness at an upcoming Election Act bribery trial for two Liberals, putting the Ontario premier directly in the spotlight of an already politically charged case.

Wynne could invoke parliamentary privilege to avoid testifying, but will not, she said Tuesday.

“I will testify, I will go along with the process and do what I can to clarify, as I have in the legislature many, many, many times,” she said.

Pat Sorbara, the premier’s former deputy chief of staff, faces two bribery charges under the Election Act, and Gerry Lougheed, a Liberal fundraiser, faces one charge. Their trial is set to start Sept. 7 and last several weeks. That could mean a verdict is delivered just months before the June 2018 election.

The pair is accused of offering a would-be candidate, Andrew Olivier, a job or appointment to get him to step aside in a 2015 byelection in Sudbury, for Wynne’s preferred candidate, Glenn Thibeault.

At the time, Thibeault was a New Democrat MP. He is now the energy minister.

Though Wynne is being called as a witness by the Crown, she has said that she had already decided Olivier would not be the byelection candidate and as a result there was no need to offer him anything in exchange for not running.

Sorbara and Lougheed both deny the charges.

Lougheed had been charged criminally, with one count of counselling an offence not committed and one count of unlawfully influencing or negotiating appointments, but those charges were stayed last year.

The investigation was sparked by recordings made by Olivier, who was the Liberal candidate in Sudbury during the 2014 general election. As a quadriplegic man who often records his conversations in lieu of taking notes, Olivier recorded chats he had with Sorbara and Lougheed. Technical difficulties prevented him from recording a call he had with Wynne herself.

The bribery section of the Election Act says no person shall directly or indirectly “give, procure or promise or agree to procure an office or employment to induce a person to become a candidate, refrain from becoming a candidate or withdraw his or her candidacy.”

A conviction under the bribery section of the Election Act carries a penalty of up to $5,000. If a judge finds it was broken “knowingly,” the penalty is a fine of up to $25,000 and/or up to two years less a day in jail.

When the charges were laid in November, Sorbara had recently taken a leave of absence as the premier’s deputy chief of staff to become the Ontario Liberal Party CEO and 2018 campaign director. She stepped down after being charged.

When asked Tuesday if she would welcome Sorbara back to work in her office if she was acquitted, Wynne said she looked forward to the opportunity to work with Sorbara again.

A second Liberal trial is set to start just days apart in Toronto.

David Livingston and Laura Miller, who were then-premier Dalton McGuinty’s chief of staff and deputy chief of staff, face charges of breach of trust, and mischief in relation to data and misuse of a computer system to commit the offence of mischief.

They were charged after a police investigation into the deletion of emails about the Liberals’ decision to cancel two gas plants prior to the 2011 election, at a cost of up to $1.1 billion.

Both Miller and Livingston have denied the charges. Their trial is scheduled the trial for six weeks starting Sept. 11.


http://www.torontosun.com/2017.....tion-trial
cosmostein





Joined: 04 Oct 2006
Posts: 7436
Reputation: 297.4
votes: 21
Location: The World

PostPosted: Wed Jul 26, 2017 9:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My thought was the Premier may want to call an election ahead of this trial;
However, if she is willing to testify then I would imagine she likely has little concern that she would be implicated.
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 6287
Reputation: 229.2
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 8:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( I agree wynne sticking around defy's logic at this point and she does not appear to have a path forward )

e
Wynne 'put her ego ahead of logic'


Andre Marin
By Andre Marin
First posted: Saturday, August 19, 2017 07:14 PM EDT | Updated: Saturday, August 19, 2017 07:19 PM EDT


News came out early on Wednesday that on Thursday afternoon something big would come out of Premier Kathleen Wynne’s mouth. An event not to be missed. The pre-spin was out of the ordinary.

Pundits started speculating.

Wynne was supposed to meet with her Liberal party executive, followed by a cabinet meeting and an “open” caucus meeting which would be live-tweeted and broadcasted on YouTube. It sent the Queens Park media pool and a few analysts in a tizzy. What were the tall foreheads in her office scheming?

It created buzz and had all the telltale signs and markings that something big was about to happen.

Some were speculating that Wynne had come to her senses, put party before person and realized that it was time for her to go to give the Liberals a fighting chance at survival in next June’s provincial election. After all, when you’ve been sitting at 15% approval ratings 10 months before the vote, the likelihood of her winning is extremely
slim.
How low is 15%? Let’s put it in context. South of the border, US President Donald Trump is being excoriated for having “only” a 34% approval rating. Wynne should be so lucky.

It’s possible a fresh face at the helm with new ideas could renew the Liberals in time for the election.

But of course, Wynne, who views herself as a great campaigner, put her ego ahead of logic. History will liken her to the band of musicians who played on when with the titanic was sinking to the bottom of the Atlantic.

Others speculated that she was poised to call a snap election for the fall. She’s been handing out goodies to buy votes for months now — with questionable effect given her approval rating. But the cupboard is bare now and those goodies risk being forgotten in 10 months. And the party is scrambling to fill nominations. Not to mention that the party’s finances trail the rival Progressive Conservatives.

So what was all the hoopla about on Thursday? It turns out to have been a publicity ploy. Liberal House Leader Yasir Naqvi let the cat out of the bag in a mid-morning tweet that Wynne was going to outline her “Plan for Fairness and Opportunity” at the caucus meeting. The whole thing landed like a big thud.

What was meant as a big splash barely left any impression. And there’s hardly a trace of her announcement on the internet. Nothing on the government of Ontario newsroom. A few tweets from reporters describe that the Liberals greeted her with chants of “4 more years! 4 more years.” Just like trained seals.

Wynne declared to her captive audience that the “world is inherently unfair” and that Ontario is not immune to global problems. As Queens Park Today’s Allison Smith tweeted: “And that’s it. Much ado about, literally, nothing.”

If anything, her announcement backfired. It’s rich of Wynne to speak of fairness. Anyone who consumes electricity in Ontario would have a word or two about the topic.

If Wynne has any chance of surviving the election, she’ll have to do better than pretending she’s some kind of philosopher king serving up puff, platitude and empty words at a dog and pony show in Neverland.

http://www.torontosun.com/2017.....d-of-logic
cosmostein





Joined: 04 Oct 2006
Posts: 7436
Reputation: 297.4
votes: 21
Location: The World

PostPosted: Mon Aug 21, 2017 8:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The time to call an election was prior to the PC policy convention in November;
They could have campaigned that Brown simply was unprepared and doing nothing but damning the Liberals with no plans to fix the issues he was raising.

Unless the plan is to do it during the fall session, its highly unlikely that will be the case.

Hydro Rebates, Superscription Drugs for those under 25, a potential minimum wage increase are the tools of the next election.

Let people get use to them and dare them to vote PC and have those things taken away.

Buying votes isn't expensive, a few hundred bucks usually does it.

The OLP is simply challenging Brown to run a campaign where he will take hydro rebates from seniors, puffers from 12 years olds, and money from working single moms.

Time is on their side now.
Bugs





Joined: 16 Dec 2009
Posts: 4154
Reputation: 238.9
votes: 8

PostPosted: Tue Aug 22, 2017 12:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is why you need some principles in politics.

I don't mind borrowing money, just to be clear. If it is used to actually build infrastructure that has a real, discernible economic advantage, it will repay itself from the general increased economic tempo it will contribute to. It's a good thing.

That's true of roads, but it's also true of sewers. The size of your sewers limits the size of your city. These are all things that can be justified as job-creating projects. If labour were on a market, it would amount to taking advantage of a drop in the price of labour.

But if you are going into debt to finance vote-buying presents to the girls -- once again -- you have to say NO!

Why? Except in emergency cases, such as depressions, it is only permissible to use debt to finance long-term projects, things that can be amortized over 20 years or more. But when you go into debt to pay social benefits, it's like rowing a boat with a leak in it. You just better hope that you can bail the water faster than it is coming in.

In fact, you are not buying an asset, like a road, you are buying a parasite class. These funds become the basis of a lifestyle for a large sector of society. The more 'adequate' the support is, the more applicants there are. The recipients, in varying degrees, do not prosper with the aid. They don't use it to get over a bad patch -- the pattern is once on assistance, always on it. The people on it are, in the ordinary case, diminished. Their skills decay, they get bad habits.

I don't just mean slum-dwellers, here. Compare the recent Asian immigrants to equally poor Canadian groups. The Asians are likely to avoid welfare, and hunker down and hustle. The Canadians go from pogey to assistance, roll a joint and crack a beer. A stereotype, but you get my drift. Once on assistance, you look for money you don't hae to report. That's the basic challenge.

The hard fact is that a little bit of desperation can be a good thing. Maybe we all should face it at least once in our lives, and have to deal with it. It gives us a sense of proportion and clarifies what is genuinely important.

But this gets into layman philosophy and ... you know ... philosophy in the 21st century is tiresome and has wandered off the path. How do you sell cutbacks, politically?

The point is, the national debt has to be used with discipline, like mortgage financing. It's the path to disaster to fund social benefits with debt. People have to understand that. Beyond the financial implications, there is a wider demoralization involved in the welfare state. Recipients become passive and distracted by the bread and circuses.

Given the nature of government, the only way you can run a welfare state without decay is by having a government that operates on a balanced budget as a normal condition. Otherwise, you are just screwing your kids, at best.

You've got some savvy about these things, Cosmo. You can follow me here. In the US, the government has been funding a third to half of its costs through debt! It's budget now runs at about $800 billion a year more than when Bush was in the White House. That money goes into the GDP! But does it indicate an increase in economic activity? Not really.

It amounts to 5% or 6% to the GDP. If we deducted the effect of increased government spending from the GDP, the US would have been in a depression all of Obama's administration!

Put differently, if we used a different metric of the strength and productivity of the economy, we would probably have a better picture of whats happening right now. Has this been a recovery? It's almost heresy to wonder that. It's like political correctness, you aren't allowed to be pessimistic in the financial world, even if it is realistic.

Our short-term prosperity depends on keeping this going. Our long-term prosperity depends on reversing course as quickly as possible. (In the long term, classic economics would say we have to go back to saving money and producing things.) That's where we are, in my mind at least.

The US cannot endlessly finance trade losses and maintain welfare state benefits. No country can. There is an expression common amongst economic planners -- if a thing can't go on, it won't. I think this is where we are coming to, as a province in a commercial empire -- the center is coming to crisis. What is best in our situation? It's a big question ...

But for sure, political parties who think they have to flatter and pander to get support are going to be a disaster. Pragmatic realism ought to be on the political spectrum, particularly in times like these. It all comes down to this -- we have a huge job of public education to do. We have to make people aware that there will be an ultimate bag-holder, when this ends. It may be a decade from now, but there will be a day of reckoning.
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 6287
Reputation: 229.2
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Wed Aug 23, 2017 6:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wynne’s promises are all suspect


First posted: Tuesday, August 22, 2017 06:34 PM EDT | Updated: Tuesday, August 22, 2017 06:38 PM EDT


Here is Premier Kathleen Wynne’s not-so-secret strategy for winning the June, 2018, Ontario election.

She will portray Progressive Conservative Leader Patrick Brown as a right-wing dinosaur and steal NDP Leader Andrea Horwath’s political promises, while declaring she alone can stop the threat a PC government would pose to Ontario.

Because that’s what she did the last time (with a different PC leader) and it worked.

Liberals always run from the left and then suffer from political amnesia, post-election.

In the 2014 vote, in order to outflank Horwath on the left, Wynne accused the NDP of running on a “Rob Ford-like list of populist, disconnected ideas as their platform.”

At the time, Horwath’s election promises included such “populist” and “disconnected” ideas as removing the 8% provincial portion of the HST from hydro bills.

If that sounds familiar, it should, because Wynne did it after the election.

But Wynne didn’t just steal Horwath’s promises post-election.

She adopted them before the election, promising to implement the NDP’s demand for a 15% cut to auto insurance rates by August, 2015, in return for the NDP approving her 2013 budget.

Post-election, after Wynne failed to even come close to achieving this promised cut, she dismissed her broken pledge as a “stretch goal” she always knew would be difficult to achieve.

If you think we’re suggesting you can’t trust what the Liberals say or promise during an election, that’s exactly what we’re suggesting.

Based on the 2014 election, any promise they fail to keep may simply be dismissed by Wynne after the fact as a “stretch goal”.

Heck, we’re saying you can’t even trust the Ontario Liberals when they put their promises in writing.

Wynne’s predecessor, Dalton McGuinty, did that in the 2003 election which brought the Liberals to power, when he signed a taxpayer protection pledge during the election not to raise taxes or implement any new ones.

Post-election, he brought in one of the largest single tax hikes in Ontario history.

There’s an old saying, “fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me.”

Lest Ontarians be played for fools in the 2018 election, again, we suggest taking anything the Liberals say with a huge grain of salt.

http://www.torontosun.com/2017.....ll-suspect
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 6287
Reputation: 229.2
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Wed Aug 23, 2017 6:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
The time to call an election was prior to the PC policy convention in November;
They could have campaigned that Brown simply was unprepared and doing nothing but damning the Liberals with no plans to fix the issues he was raising.

Unless the plan is to do it during the fall session, its highly unlikely that will be the case.

Hydro Rebates, Superscription Drugs for those under 25, a potential minimum wage increase are the tools of the next election.

Let people get use to them and dare them to vote PC and have those things taken away.

Buying votes isn't expensive, a few hundred bucks usually does it.

The OLP is simply challenging Brown to run a campaign where he will take hydro rebates from seniors, puffers from 12 years olds, and money from working single moms.

Time is on their side now.


the liberals are hoping people care more about minor issues like the minimum wage or daycare spaces . the federal liberals had a similar plan in 2004-2006 and it didn't work out that well

the big risk for the liberals is people simply decide they want " change " and there is a change election , where a % of voters simply decide its time for another party in power instead
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 6287
Reputation: 229.2
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Thu Aug 31, 2017 1:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

(with her personal popularity in the dumps , wynne now wants people to like her governments policies more instead of herself . at this point it seems like a strategy based around desperation )


Queen's Park


Kathleen Wynne wants you to like her policies, not her


Ontario’s premier doesn’t want to be your friend; she just wants to lead your provincial government.


By Robert BenzieQueen's Park Bureau Chief

Wed., Aug. 30, 2017



Kathleen Wynne doesn’t want to be your friend; she just wants to be your premier.

Languishing at historic lows in personal popularity polls, even as her government’s initiatives appear to be gaining traction, Wynne says Ontarians don’t have to love her when they vote on June 7, 2018.

Asked earlier this week by CP24’s Cristina Tenaglia why Liberal policies are popular while polling suggests she, herself, is not, the premier smiled gamely and interjected.

“You know what, you’re going to have to determine what it says about me,” Wynne said at a campaign-style event Tuesday at the Berkeley Street Theatre.

“Here’s what I do in the morning: I get up. I read the newspaper. I listen to you guys. I go for my run and then I come to work and I do my job,” she said.


“And my job is about creating a fair Ontario, creating an Ontario where kids and adults, seniors have the opportunity to live a life that is the very best life that they can live.


Premier Kathleen Wynne: "My job is about creating a fair Ontario, creating an Ontario where kids and adults, seniors have the opportunity to live a life that is the very best life that they can live."

Premier Kathleen Wynne: "My job is about creating a fair Ontario, creating an Ontario where kids and adults, seniors have the opportunity to live a life that is the very best life that they can live." (Richard Lautens / Toronto Star file photo)


“That’s my job.”



That moment of candour at first seemed as though it may have been a slip of the tongue.


But Wynne and her aides have retweeted video of her response to Tenaglia to tens of thousands of people on Twitter and posted it on Facebook.

The Liberals have done so because they want voters to be thinking about policies, not personalities, when casting their ballots nine months from now.

“Whether people like me or not, I’m really glad that people think that free tuition for kids who live in low income families is a good idea,” said Wynne.

“I’m really glad that people think that having free medications for kids from zero to 25 is a really good idea,” she said.

“I’m really glad that people think that increasing the minimum wage is a good idea, and that that makes for a fairer Ontario.”

The premier, who trails both Progressive Conservative Leader Patrick Brown and NDP Leader Andrea Horwath in personal approval ratings, indicated she has no illusions about winning a popularity contest.

“The people who love me are my family and I go home to them.

“My job is to make sure that the people of Ontario have the best opportunity possible.”

Internal government polling obtained by The Canadian Press through a Freedom of Information request suggests the Liberals are rebounding thanks in part to support for increasing the $11.40 hourly minimum wage to $14 in January and $15 in 2019.

Last month, 71 per cent of respondents said they supported the policy, which is opposed by many business groups concerned about labour costs.

“Increasing the minimum wage, along with protection for temporary and part-time workers, serves to increase confidence in government even more than increases to health care spending,” the Gandalf Group pollsters wrote.

Gandalf, which is headed by David Herle, Wynne’s campaign manager, also found Ontarians like the 25 per cent cut in consumer electricity rates, which is being paid for through increased borrowing.

One insider confided Wednesday that Liberals still have an uphill climb to ensure the premier, herself, is seen as the face of popular policies.

“It’s great that people like the minimum wage, the hydro plan, and pharmacare, but we aren’t yet getting much credit for it,” said the senior official, speaking on condition of anonymity in order to discuss internal strategy.

“We still have a long way to go.”

Read more about:
Kathleen Wynne

https://www.thestar.com/news/queenspark/2017/08/30/kathleen-wynne-wants-you-to-like-her-policies-not-her.html
Bugs





Joined: 16 Dec 2009
Posts: 4154
Reputation: 238.9
votes: 8

PostPosted: Fri Sep 01, 2017 11:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree with you that she is wrong in her desperation.

My impression is that people dislike her precisely because of her government's policies. If they wanted to find another reason in her private life, it wouldn't be that hard. But people genuinely don't care about who she sleeps with. It's what they've done to us, in the form of hydro bills, and the like, that shape people's feelings.
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 6287
Reputation: 229.2
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Fri Sep 01, 2017 3:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
I agree with you that she is wrong in her desperation.

My impression is that people dislike her precisely because of her government's policies. If they wanted to find another reason in her private life, it wouldn't be that hard. But people genuinely don't care about who she sleeps with. It's what they've done to us, in the form of hydro bills, and the like, that shape people's feelings.



I've heard things about how people didn't like wynne for some reason on a personal level but I have to agree that people were upset with her governments policies and that's why the polling kept going down .

there has been a lot of policy reasons to dislike the Ontario liberals over the years and we often forgot about all the dumb things they have done to us .

wynne took over a government that had a lot of baggage and is clearly past its best before date and really lacks any reason as to why they should continue to be in power

the reality with politics is eventually another party takes over , no one party has ever been in power forever
Bugs





Joined: 16 Dec 2009
Posts: 4154
Reputation: 238.9
votes: 8

PostPosted: Fri Sep 01, 2017 9:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Also, in a way, it might be the more honourable thing to do -- to face the public and lose, rather than punting on second down, so to speak.

It might be that there isn't anyone to hand off to. When Mulroney left, they said that they handed upstart Kim Campbell a poisoned chalice. Same idea, because she was almost certain to lose. I like the 'poisoned chalice' picture although the image of the cigarette and the blindfold is better.

I give Kathleen Wynne her due as a purely political animal. She deserves more respect than Dalton, that's for sure. She beat John Tory in his home riding, and she won a majority in an election that everyone thought she would lose.

Give her credit, and get her out of here -- because if she wins, where will the province end up?
Post new topic   Reply to topic Page 11 of 14

Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 10, 11, 12, 13, 14  Next  


 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You cannot download files in this forum


Wynne still canada's least popular premier new poll

phpBBCopyright 2001, 2005 phpBB