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RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Jul 04, 2017 9:44 am    Post subject: Omar Khadr to get apology and compensation Reply with quote

( truly sickening if this is really true , pitiful that our government is going to reward a terrorist with free money and an apology he doesn't deserve )


Omar Khadr to get apology, compensation: reports




CTVNews.ca Staff
Published Monday, July 3, 2017 11:56PM EDT
Last Updated Tuesday, July 4, 2017 4:45AM EDT


The federal government is set to offer Omar Khadr an apology and more than $10 million in compensation for abuses he suffered during his detainment in Guantanamo Bay, according to multiple reports.

An announcement of the deal is expected this week, the Globe and Mail and Toronto Star reported late Monday night.

Khadr was 15 years old when he was captured in Afghanistan in 2002, following a shootout with U.S. troops. He was accused of throwing a grenade that killed Sgt. Christopher Speer.



Omar Khadr
Omar Khadr, left, leaves court with his lawyer Nate Whitling, right, after a judge ruled to relax bail conditions in Edmonton on Sept. 18, 2015. (Amber Bracken / THE CANADIAN PRESS)

He spent most of the next 10 years in Guantanamo Bay, as the youngest and last Western detainee held at the prison, before accepting a plea deal that enabled him to return to Canada in 2012. He was freed on bail in May 2015 and moved into the care of his Canadian lawyer Dennis Edney.

The Supreme Court of Canada ruled in 2010 that Canada violated Khadr’s rights when officials interrogated him at Guantanamo Bay.

"Interrogation of a youth, to elicit statements about the most serious criminal charges while detained in these conditions and without access to counsel, and while knowing that the fruits of the interrogations would be shared with the U.S. prosecutors, offends the most basic Canadian standards about the treatment of detained youth suspects," the court ruled.

Speer's widow and another American soldier blinded by the grenade Khadr was accused of throwing filed a wrongful death and injury lawsuit against Khadr in 2014. A U.S. judge granted $134.2 million in damages in 2015, but the plaintiffs said then that there was little chance they would collect any of the money from Khadr because he lives in Canada.

With files from the Associated Press

http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/o.....-1.3487675
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Jul 04, 2017 9:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ottawa to offer Omar Khadr apology, $10-million in compensation


Robert Fife

OTTAWA BUREAU CHIEF — The Globe and Mail


Published Monday, Jul. 03, 2017 10:00PM EDT


The Trudeau government is poised to offer an apology and a $10-million compensation package to former child soldier Omar Khadr for abuses he suffered while detained in the U.S. military prison for captured and suspected terrorists at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

The Supreme Court of Canada ruled in 2010 that the actions of federal officials who participated in U.S. interrogations of Mr. Khadr had offended “the most basic Canadian standards about the treatment of detained youth suspects.”

The court said the action of the Canadian government had violated the former child soldier’s rights under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and deprived him of fundamental principles of justice.


Read more: How can Canada condone torture?

A federal insider said the announcement of an official apology and compensation is expected this week.

Mr. Khadr’s lawyer, Dennis Edney, has been seeking a formal apology from the United States and from the Trudeau government for the alleged abuse and neglect of Mr. Khadr while he was in the prison. Attempts to reach Mr. Edney for comment on Monday were unsuccessful.

The apology and compensation is similar to the $10.5-million that Ottawa gave Syrian-born Canadian Maher Arar after a 2006 judicial inquiry found Canadian officials had passed on information about him to U.S. national-security authorities, leading to his torture and imprisonment in Syria.

Mr. Khadr was captured in Afghanistan at the age of 15 in 2002, following a shootout with U.S. troops where he was badly wounded – blinded by shrapnel in one eye and with fist-sized exit wounds in his shoulder and chest.

He was accused of throwing a grenade that killed U.S. army medic Christopher Speer in the firefight and was sent to the U.S. detention facility in Guantanamo Bay.

Mr. Khadr, now 30, spent more than 10 years in U.S. and Canadian custody, much of that time in the Guantanamo Bay detention centre. Once the youngest detainee in Guantanamo, he was transferred to Canada in 2012 after accepting a plea deal.

Mr. Edney has said his client was treated abysmally even though he was a child soldier and his body shattered from wounds. U.S. interrogators subjected him to sleep deprivation and solitary confinement.

Mr. Edney said Mr. Khadr was coerced into fighting by his father, Ahmed Said Khadr – a top al-Qaeda operative until he was killed in a gunfight with Pakistani troops in 2003.

In March, Mr. Khadr underwent a 19-hour operation in an Edmonton hospital to repair his shoulder, which was severely damaged during the firefight with U.S soldiers.

“Nobody advocated for his health whatsoever. Even when he came back to Canada, I raised all those issues with the Correctional Services and of course [former prime minister Stephen] Harper was not interested in hearing anything like that,” Mr. Edney said in an interview last March.

Mr. Khadr was freed on bail in May, 2015, and released under the supervision of Mr. Edney.

He said he would “prove to [Canadians] that I’m a good person.”

The International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group and Lawyer’s Rights Watch Canada have concluded that Canada contravened its obligations under the Conventions against Torture by failing to prevent and investigate what happened to Mr. Khadr in Guantanamo Bay.

Last March, Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale issued an apology and compensation package to three Muslim Canadian men – Abdullah Almalki, Ahmad Abou-Elmatti and Muayyed Nureddin. They had been tortured and held for months in Syria and Egypt, suspected of links to terrorism.

A decade ago, they each filed $100-million lawsuits against Ottawa but halted their legal proceedings to allow former Supreme Court justice Frank Iacobucci to conduct an internal inquiry. Mr. Iacobucci ruled in 2008 that Canadian officials were indirectly responsible for their torture.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/ottawa-to-offer-omar-khadr-apology-compensation-package/article35538745/
Bugs





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PostPosted: Tue Jul 04, 2017 5:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Compensation? Compensation?

Canada is being run by lunatics.
Toronto Centre





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PostPosted: Tue Jul 04, 2017 6:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Getting expensive.

Our politicians should learn from this. But I kind of doubt it.

Abuse rights of others and here you go.

Enjoy your money Omar.
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Jul 05, 2017 6:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Omar Khadr's undeserved jackpot


First posted: Tuesday, July 04, 2017 04:48 PM EDT | Updated: Tuesday, July 04, 2017 05:08 PM EDT



The estimated jackpot for Wednesday's Lotto 6/49 is $7 million, or chump change if your name happens to be Omar Khadr.

The Trudeau government is reportedly set to settle a civil suit launched by Khadr, and pay the young Canadian al-Qaida operative upwards of $10 million, as well as officially apologize to him for not treating him with kid gloves and intervention hugs.

How cruel of us, reads the acquiescent fine print, to treat him like the terrorist he was, and not as a misguided "child soldier."

Meanwhile, U.S. Marine Sgt. Christopher Speer, killed in Afghanistan where we lost 159 of our own, has been dead now for 15 years, thanks to a grenade tossed by Khadr.

Two weeks before receiving his mortal wounding, Speer was awarded the Soldier's Medal for risking his life to save two Afghan children trapped in a minefield.

So excuse us if our heart does not bleed for Khadr like the progressives now cheering his civil court victory.

Excuse us, too, that we think it is hideous for Ottawa to give him $10 million in taxpayers' money, and an even more hideous to apologize for not coming to his rescue when the Americans first captured him -- but not before U.S. medics saved his life -- and tossed him into Guantanamo Bay for war crimes.

Ah, the apple and the tree. They don't easily part.

Omar Khadr's father, a well-documented al-Qaida insurgent, was killed in 2003 during a firefight with Pakistani forces. His younger brother was shot and rendered a paraplegic in the same battle in which his father was killed. A third spent five years in jail on a U.S. extradition request before finally being released.

And yet another bragged to the press about being a proud member of an "al-Qaida family."

Let us not forget, too, that Omar Khadr pleaded guilty to Speer's murder in 2010, and was sentenced to eight more years in prison.

So this is the price we pay for bringing him "home" two years later so he could serve the rest of his sentence in Canada, and then sue us for trampling on his rights.

Ten million big ones, and a grovel.

http://www.torontosun.com/2017.....ed-jackpot
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Jul 05, 2017 9:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Toronto Centre wrote:
Getting expensive.

Our politicians should learn from this. But I kind of doubt it.

Abuse rights of others and here you go.

Enjoy your money Omar.


Just curious -- which politicians? and what should they learn?

It seems to clear to me. I don't understand why the people of Canada have any liability to Omar Khadr whatever. He joined up as a volunteer, killed an American medic, and then had his life saved. Why is Canada paying him anything?

I wonder if the Sage of Blither can explain these strange events to us, with some particular reference to what we should learn.
Toronto Centre





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PostPosted: Wed Jul 05, 2017 11:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I get that some people like to be wishy washy on rights but thats on them.

I value our rights no matter the content . At times it is hard to stay true to this but an injustice is an injustice.

That some apparently like to change the narrative to fit their agenda of denying rights only means they want to impose a "sometimes we can abuse others rights". Ahh lovely and convenient.

This payment is for the abuse/mishandling that the Canadian Government is responsible for.

This is of course , no matter what attempts are to post alternative facts , due to the treatment after the facts, not to mention those facts of conviction are pretty damn shady to begin with.

The Supreme Court stands tall.

Pay up and move on. [/b]
Toronto Centre





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PostPosted: Wed Jul 05, 2017 11:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here...you can argue against this should you wish.

Good luck!

Quote:
For a counterpoint — and for a hint that a settlement was perhaps inevitable — one can turn to the Supreme Court's unanimous ruling on Jan. 29, 2010, that found Khadr's human rights were being violated at Guantanamo Bay.

In that case, the court dealt with the visit of CSIS and Foreign Affairs officials to the prison in 2003 and 2004, under the previous Liberal government.

"The deprivation of [Khadr's] right to liberty and security of the person is not in accordance with the principles of fundamental justice," the court ruled.

"The interrogation of a youth detained without access to counsel, to elicit statements about serious criminal charges while knowing that the youth had been subjected to sleep deprivation and while knowing that the fruits of the interrogations would be shared with the prosecutors, offends the most basic Canadian standards about the treatment of detained youth suspects."

Ottawa set to pay $10.5M to Omar Khadr, government source says
Ottawa drops appeal seeking to overturn Khadr's bail
Whatever Khadr did or did not do as a teenager on a battlefield in Afghanistan in July 2002, whether he deserves to be described as a "terrorist" or a "child soldier," he was and is a Canadian citizen with rights. And, as determined by no less than the Supreme Court of Canada, the Canadian government was complicit in the violation of those rights.

It is for that reason, presumably, that the Canadian government is now preparing to apologize and pay him $10.5 million, according to reports

Precedents for Khadr

Conservatives are now in high dudgeon. But they should be familiar with both the 2010 ruling and a related judgment by the Supreme Court in 2008 that dealt with Khadr's access to documents.

Conservatives should also be aware of their own precedent for such compensation: it was Stephen Harper's government that agreed to pay $10 million to Maher Arar in 2007, acknowledging the Canadian government's actions may have led to his torture by Syrian officials in 2002.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politic.....72?cmp=rss

So...governments..... Liberal or Conservatives do not get a free ride on this.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Jul 05, 2017 12:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What has a free ride got to do with it? It's Omar that is getting the free ride.

He has a human right not to be taken to Guantanamo -- based on what? He is not a combatant of any state, he wears no uniform, he was a brigand, and possibly a war criminal. They could have lined him up against a wall and shot him.

And how is Canada responsible for keeping him out of Guantanamo? In fact, Canada did spring him, and he served much of his sentence in Canadian jails.

And now we owe him $10 million for not doing better?

WTF?

This is a decision made by someone who needs two nannies to make life bearable. Our pantomime Prime Minister (and socks collector) panders and solves every embarrassment with our money.
Toronto Centre





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PostPosted: Wed Jul 05, 2017 1:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

How do I know you didnt read a single word of the report above?

This is how...
Bugs wrote:
What has a free ride got to do with it? It's Omar that is getting the free ride.

He has a human right not to be taken to Guantanamo -- based on what? He is not a combatant of any state, he wears no uniform, he was a brigand, and possibly a war criminal. They could have lined him up against a wall and shot him.

And how is Canada responsible for keeping him out of Guantanamo? In fact, Canada did spring him, and he served much of his sentence in Canadian jails.

And now we owe him $10 million for not doing better?

WTF?

Yes, WTF are you talking about? None of that is why he is being paid. Alternative facts again? Oh boy.
Quote:

This is a decision made by someone who needs two nannies to make life bearable. Our pantomime Prime Minister (and socks collector) panders and solves every embarrassment with our money.


And what silly juvenile words will you use when advising us of Harpers payments to Arar?

The Supreme Court has it right. That you think the SC is a monkey group is on you.

Please, next time know the issues beforehand...k? Thanks
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Jul 06, 2017 7:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Widow of slain soldier to seek Liberals' $10.5M Khadr payout


Colin Perkel, THE CANADIAN PRESS

First posted: Wednesday, July 05, 2017 09:24 AM EDT | Updated: Wednesday, July 05, 2017 04:01 PM EDT


TORONTO — Lawyers acting for the widow of an American special forces soldier have filed an application in Canada seeking to enforce a massive U.S. damages award against former Guantanamo Bay detainee Omar Khadr.

The application comes amid word the federal government is set to pay the Toronto-born Khadr $10.5 million and apologize to him to settle his long-running lawsuit for breaching his rights.

The filing in Ontario Superior Court, obtained by The Canadian Press, also says the applicants might ask for an order blocking Ottawa from paying Khadr any compensation. Alternatively, it wants any government money flowing to Khadr to go instead to relatives of Sgt. Chris Speer and retired U.S. sergeant Layne Morris.

Watch Khadr's 2015 interview with Al Jazeera

Filed on June 8, the application seeks a declaration recognizing a US$134.1-million default judgment against Khadr from Utah in June 2015 and an order that he pay the money. It also asks for another US$900,000 in legal and other costs plus accrued interest.

The unproven application has not been advanced since its filing, according to Toronto-based lawyer David Winer, and no hearing date has been set.

“There’s nothing pending right now,” Winer said on Wednesday.

Watch CCTV footage of Khadr's interrogation

Winer, who refused further comment, said he had not heard anything from Khadr’s Edmonton-based lawyer, Dennis Edney, who also refused to discuss the case.

The application was filed on behalf of relatives of Speer, who was killed in Afghanistan in July 2002 during a fierce firefight in which Khadr, then 15 years old, was captured badly wounded. Retired U.S. sergeant Layne Morris, who was blinded in one eye during the same battle, is a co-applicant.

American authorities accused Khadr of throwing the grenade that killed Speer — an allegation that became one of the five war crimes to which he pleaded guilty before a much maligned military commission in Guantanamo Bay in 2010.



Khadr, now on bail pending an appeal of his U.S. conviction, has said he admitted to killing Speer and to the other purported war crimes only as a way out of the infamous prison in Cuba given that he could have been held indefinitely even if acquitted.

“Regardless of Khadr’s confession at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, the evidence tendered at the military commission from other witnesses established that Khadr was the only live person found at the compound capable of launching the grenade which killed SFC Speer and injured SFC Morris,” the document states.

Watch a speech by Khadr's lawyer at Carleton University

In fact, evidence before the commission showed American forces found a second person alive in the rubble, and that Morris was hit well before Speer was killed.

The document also notes Khadr apologized to Speer’s widow Tabitha and Morris “thus further admitting his guilt.”

Khadr, who was at the time in prison in Canada, did not defend against the Utah lawsuit, which was based almost entirely on the proceedings at Guantanamo Bay.

Legal experts have said it would be difficult to enforce the American judgment given, among other things, its heavy reliance on the commission. Courts here are statute barred from enforcing foreign judgments that offend Canada’s public policy, and the Supreme Court has found the Guantanamo system contrary to Canadians’ concept of justice.

Neither Morris nor his American lawyer Don Winder returned calls seeking comment.

http://www.torontosun.com/2017.....give-khadr
Bugs





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PostPosted: Thu Jul 06, 2017 2:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Toronto Centre wrote:
How do I know you didnt read a single word of the report above?

This is how...
Bugs wrote:
What has a free ride got to do with it? It's Omar that is getting the free ride.

He has a human right not to be taken to Guantanamo -- based on what? He is not a combatant of any state, he wears no uniform, he was a brigand, and possibly a war criminal. They could have lined him up against a wall and shot him.

And how is Canada responsible for keeping him out of Guantanamo? In fact, Canada did spring him, and he served much of his sentence in Canadian jails.

And now we owe him $10 million for not doing better?

WTF?

Yes, WTF are you talking about? None of that is why he is being paid. Alternative facts again? Oh boy.
Quote:

This is a decision made by someone who needs two nannies to make life bearable. Our pantomime Prime Minister (and socks collector) panders and solves every embarrassment with our money.


And what silly juvenile words will you use when advising us of Harpers payments to Arar?

The Supreme Court has it right. That you think the SC is a monkey group is on you.

Please, next time know the issues beforehand...k? Thanks


I did read it, and re-read it. Let's accept that Khadr has a right, like .., oh, say Jian Ghomeshi ... to a certain freedom from prosecution without evidence. But how does that apply to someone who voluntarily joined a guerilla military formation and killed an American medic in a third world country? Further, he admitted his own guilt.

He wasn't a soldier, didn't wear a uniform, etc. so all that Geneva Convention stuff about PoWs doesn't apply. During the Russian occupation, the Taliban skinned captured Russian soldiers alive near their camps, so they could the troops could hear the screams. Nobody even thinks any rules of war apply to Afghans whatever.

In that context, where does the Canadian taxpayer's liability come from? What could the Canadian government have done that it didn't do? Omar would have killed Canadian troops just as easily as he killed American.

True, Canada didn't try to expedite the normal procedures, but when the normal procedures allowed Omar to serve the rest of his sentence -- yes, he had a trial in the US -- in Canada, Canada accepted him. What else was the country supposed to do? Give him a party?

You think I am taking one side of an issue, but do you see any of my fellow Conservatives showing the least bit of interest? There are no 'sides' on this, apparently. Just so you know, I expect little if any financial judgement from Junior Trudeau ... but when I see the obvious examples of mismanagement, you can expect a little snark.

I am honestly asking the question: when did these 'social justice' ideas get state power behind them? Where did my small part of the liability come from? Who is it that can put such liabilities on people without their consent, or even their knowledge? What can I do to avoid this penalty in the future? I want to examine the logic of whatever document this goes back to. What's wrong with that? If you could answer any of those questions, I'd be grateful.

It would be nice to know if only because we might be able to avoid this mistake next time. So, rather than throwing the Arar case in my face -- which was different in the sense the the RCMP put initiated Arar's detention in the first place (I am not defending that. But I think its the actual perps who should do the paying. Otherwise, it is meaningless.) But the point isn't the Arar case, or Stephen Harper, or any of that. To me, it's about how Parliament is being side-lined.

How can it be 'constitutional' that Human Rights Tribunals set aside all the normal protections of the criminal law and impose penalties for using constitutionally protected rights, such as freedom of speech?

Please, spare me your huffiness. It doesn't become you.
Toronto Centre





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PostPosted: Thu Jul 06, 2017 4:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:

I did read it, and re-read it. Let's accept that Khadr has a right, like .., oh, say Jian Ghomeshi ... to a certain freedom from prosecution without evidence.

Lets just say every person on Canadian soil and every Canadian has rights that cannot be suspended without extremely extenuating circumstance(s).
Quote:

But how does that apply to someone who voluntarily joined a guerilla military formation and killed an American medic in a third world country? Further, he admitted his own guilt.

None of this is cause to suspend rights. This is were most go off the rails. What he did does NOT matter as respects his rights.
So..even a piece of shit has rights that we must defend. There is no other way.
Quote:

He wasn't a soldier, didn't wear a uniform, etc. so all that Geneva Convention stuff about PoWs doesn't apply. During the Russian occupation, the Taliban skinned captured Russian soldiers alive near their camps, so they could the troops could hear the screams. Nobody even thinks any rules of war apply to Afghans whatever.

None of this matters too.
Quote:

In that context, where does the Canadian taxpayer's liability come from? What could the Canadian government have done that it didn't do? Omar would have killed Canadian troops just as easily as he killed American.

Now this is the gist of the problem.

The taxpayers liability comes from the fact that we elect a govt to do things on our behalf. When they screw up like this they are forced to pay compensation once the Supreme Court has issued a ruling.
Its the same when Cops screw up , Muni's pay the bill, when employees screw up the corp pays the bills.

Had Omar been killed outright none of this would be an issue.
Quote:

True, Canada didn't try to expedite the normal procedures, but when the normal procedures allowed Omar to serve the rest of his sentence -- yes, he had a trial in the US -- in Canada, Canada accepted him. What else was the country supposed to do? Give him a party?

He didnt have a trial in the US, which is one of the problems. He had it in Cuba. The trial itself is subject to a whole lot of doubt including the worst possible kind, Prosecution withholding exculpatory evidence.
Quote:

You think I am taking one side of an issue, but do you see any of my fellow Conservatives showing the least bit of interest?

Well perhaps not here at BT but out in the country at large I see a lot of people foaming at the mouth yet they foam about non-issues in this specific case. They want to bring in what he did, how he did it, how he isnt CDN and so on. Now pretty much all of that is a non-issue and immaterial .
Quote:
... but when I see the obvious examples of mismanagement, you can expect a little snark.
And thats all well and fine as long as the snark is directed to the correct govt employees who did this and caused all this angst ! Had they brespected his rights from the get go none of this is an issue.
Quote:

I am honestly asking the question: when did these 'social justice' ideas get state power behind them?


When they were elected to The Supreme Court. Im pretty sure they are not SJW.
Quote:

Where did my small part of the liability come from? Who is it that can put such liabilities on people without their consent, or even their knowledge? What can I do to avoid this penalty in the future?

You have an elected govt represent you. Do you say this when the new hospital is built in the next tow? When a new road is built? You were most certainly NOT asked so...
You can I suppose go underground and never be a upstanding member of the citizenry or move to a nother country. Apart from that? Nothing you can do to avoid this.
Quote:
I want to examine the logic of whatever document this goes back to. What's wrong with that? If you could answer any of those questions, I'd be grateful.

Ok. The Charter of Rights and Freedoms. This entire thing pinges on thatb document. It is the reason he got paid.
Quote:

It would be nice to know if only because we might be able to avoid this mistake next time.

Oh I am with you on this point. Id like to avoid it too. Sadly tho we have/had folks sitting in Ottawa who should have known better and truly should have done so. But they didnt and here we are.
Quote:
So, rather than throwing the Arar case in my face -- which was different in the sense the the RCMP put initiated Arar's detention in the first place

They are both part and parcel of the same problem. I merely reminded you of the a precedent.
Arar got cash for violation of rights.
Khadr got cash for violation of rights.

No more, no less.

Quote:
How can it be 'constitutional' that Human Rights Tribunals set aside all the normal protections of the criminal law and impose penalties for using constitutionally protected rights, such as freedom of speech?

This is not a relative point for this case.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Fri Jul 07, 2017 12:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have come here to post the following artlcle and noticed that TC has honoured me with one of his line-by-line analysis, and his invaluable point the way back to the true path ...

Later ... I will respond, but it's too nice out right now.

This is what I mean to post:
Quote:

Khadr award a 'real head scratcher': Soldier who lost eye in deadly firefight

joe-warmington BY JOE WARMINGTON, TORONTO SUN
FIRST POSTED: TUESDAY, JULY 04, 2017 09:57 PM EDT | UPDATED: TUESDAY, JULY 04, 2017 10:19 PM EDT

It’s like Omar Khadr hit the jackpot for killing Sgt. Christopher Speer — a giant $10.5-million lotto win financed by Canadian taxpayers.

“It’s a real head scratcher, let me tell you,” said retired sergeant Layne Morris, who was not only there when Speer died in Afghanistan in 2002 but lost an eye in the firefight.

“Typically, criminals pay for their crimes but this time we are paying the criminal for his crimes,” added the former American soldier. “It’s kind of ass backwards you have to admit.”

It’s blood money. For the Trudeau government, it’s a deal with the Devil.

Only in Canada could a combatant who fought against us, was convicted of killing one of our close ally’s soldiers and served eight-years in Guantanamo Bay be awarded an outrageous $10.5-million — and also receive an apology.

“As far as I am concerned — if you know the history of this case — that whole Khadr family owes humanity an apology,” said Morris, 55, just before getting ready for July 4th fireworks at his home in Utah. “I don’t understand the government giving him reward for this. His reward is being alive because an American medic like Speer used his special skills to keep him alive. He would have bled out in 30 more seconds.”

The logic of this boggles the mind. [....]
http://www.torontosun.com/2017.....us-soldier
Toronto Centre





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PostPosted: Fri Jul 07, 2017 1:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
“Typically, criminals pay for their crimes but this time we are paying the criminal for his crimes,” added the former American soldier. “It’s kind of ass backwards you have to admit.”


Another example of someone who just doesnt get it.

First off, he did pay for his crimes such as they were.

Secondly we are NOT paying him for his crimes. We are paying for the crimes commited against him by our govt.

Joe Warmington , no surprise . Hes only a hair better than Mallick. But it doesnt matter.

That what matters is why was the payment made. The rest is merely fodder for those without critical thinking skills.
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Omar Khadr to get apology and compensation

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