Home FAQ Search Memberlist User Groups Register Login   

BloggingTories.ca Forum IndexBloggingTories.ca Forum Index
    Index     FAQ     Search     Register     Login         JOIN THE DISCUSSION - CLICK HERE      

*NEW* Login or register using your Facebook account.

Not a member? Join the fastest growing conservative community!
Membership is free and takes 15 seconds


CLICK HERE or use Facebook to login or register ----> Connect



  

Post new topic   Reply to topic Page 1 of 1
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 6699
Reputation: 239.2
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Mon May 29, 2017 4:06 pm    Post subject: BC Greens to support an NDP minority government Reply with quote

( well this news certaintly will spice things up a bit when the BC legislature resumes , no one really wants a new election but a lot of people didn't want an ndp government either )



b.c. election 2017

B.C. Greens agree to support NDP in minority legislature


Justine Hunter And Ian Bailey




VICTORIA and VANCOUVER — The Globe and Mail


Published Monday, May 29, 2017 4:38PM EDT



B.C.’s Green Party has reached an agreement with the New Democrats to topple the government of Premier Christy Clark.

The agreement, which will be announced at 2 p.m. PT featuring Green Leader Andrew Weaver and NDP Leader John Horgan, would see the Greens and New Democrats use their combined one-seat majority in the legislature to bring down the BC Liberals.

The announcement ends weeks of negotiations between the Greens and both parties to either prop up the Liberals or give the New Democrats the power to form government after 16 years in Opposition.


The May 9 election gave the Liberals just 43 seats in the House. The NDP have 41 seats and the Greens have three.

Ms. Clark is obliged to recall the legislature to test the confidence of the House. If the Greens and NDP defeat the government in a confidence motion, such as a throne speech or budget, Ms. Clark would be expected to resign or ask for a new election.

However, the lieutenant-governor also has the option to ask Mr. Horgan and Mr. Weaver to govern without holding an election.

Mr. Weaver had set out three “deal breakers” that include official party status, campaign finance reform and proportional representation, although other issues, including the party’s opposition to several Liberal resource priorities, also would have likely factored into such talks.

The New Democrats have won only three elections in B.C.: first in 1972, and then again in 1991 and 1996. In the 1996, the party won a majority government despite losing the popular vote.

The province last elected a minority government in 1952. W.A.C. Bennett’s Social Credit government fell the next year and regained its majority in the subsequent election.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/greens-announce-support-in-legislature/article35147472/
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 6699
Reputation: 239.2
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Mon May 29, 2017 4:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

B.C. Election: Greens to support NDP in four-year deal, Andrew Weaver announces


Rob Shaw Rob Shaw
More from Rob Shaw

Published on: May 29, 2017 | Last Updated: May 29, 2017 2:14 PM PDT

B.C. Green party leader Andrew Weaver speaks to media in the rose garden on the Legislature grounds in Victoria, B.C., on Wednesday, May 10, 2017.

B.C. Green party leader Andrew Weaver. CHAD HIPOLITO / THE CANADIAN PRESS


VICTORIA – The B.C. Greens will support the B.C. NDP for a new four-year government, Green leader Andrew Weaver has announced.

The Liberal government of Premier Christy Clark now lacks the votes to survive the legislature and she will either have to resign or be defeated in the house.

The Liberals failed to pick up a clear majority of the 87-seats in the May 9 election. The Liberals had 43 seats, the NDP 41 and the Greens three. That left Weaver holding the balance of power, with any party needing his support in order to survive.

Power sharing talks have been underway since, between the Greens and the NDP, as well as the Greens and Liberals. Weaver and Horgan spent the weekend watching a rugby tournament in Langford. The Liberals were to hold talks with the Greens Monday morning, but Premier Christy Clark, who has not attended the negotiations in person, remained in Vancouver.

Green advisor Norman Spector provided an early insight into how the Greens “recoiled” at the idea of cutting a deal with the Liberals.


A Green-NDP deal to govern would give the two parties 44 seats in the legislature and the slimmest of majorities. A Speaker appointed from the parties would be required to break tie votes in the house, and no MLAs, cabinet ministers or the premier could leave the building for key votes or else government would be at risk of being overwhelmed by a 43-seat Liberal opposition.

By convention, Clark remains premier until she resigns or chooses to call the legislature back and test the confidence of the house with a throne speech and budget – even if her opponents have lined up against her.

Earlier on Monday, Clark posted a video to her Twitter feed in which she acknowledged the uncertainty about who would ultimately form government and reiterated she saw common ground with the other parties.

“I also know that if we can come to an agreement with other parties in the legislature for four years of stability that it’s going to be not a deal with political parties, it’s a deal with you,” she said in the video.

“Because you were the ones in the election who said you wanted us to do things differently and I want to make sure any agreement we come to reflects what you want. Because we want to make sure we do things differently in British Columbia, a new deal not for politicians, not for the legislature, but a new deal for British Columbians.”

The Greens and NDP appeared to find common ground on their opposition to the Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion and the Site C dam project. The Greens called for free childcare, while the NDP called for $10-a-day childcare. Both parties wanted to boost education funding significantly, after the Liberals lost a Supreme Court of Canada ruling during a 10 year fight with teachers. They have both called for social improvements, such as increases to the welfare and disability rates, as well as the minimum wage.

More to come

http://vancouversun.com/news/p.....government
Bugs





Joined: 16 Dec 2009
Posts: 4371
Reputation: 245.1
votes: 8

PostPosted: Mon May 29, 2017 11:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am not surprised at the outcome. Doesn't it make sense that the Greens would support the NDP in preference to the Liberals, particularly in a province where Liberals define the right end of the spectrum?

The problem is the terms. Are they forming an actual coalition? Or are they extracting terms for their support? It sounds like the latter, but the article doesn't say. And the new government's margin of victory is so small that a flu bug going around could bring down the government.

The Greens have 3 non-negotiable demands -- proportional representation being one of them. They want to stop the Kinder Morgan pipeline and stop a dam from being built. The dam is Christie Clark's pet project. I would be virtually impossible for the Liberals to get the support of the Greens without implicitly rejecting an important part of their own party's policy choices.
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 6699
Reputation: 239.2
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Tue May 30, 2017 6:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

GARY MASON

It’s not yet a done deal, but expectations are already shifting in B.C. politics


Gary Mason



The Globe and Mail


Published Monday, May 29, 2017 9:29PM EDT


For all his talk about being open to a deal to keep the provincial Liberals in power, B.C. Green Party Leader Andrew Weaver surely knew even as he uttered the words how far-fetched the idea actually was.

He’d spent the past four years castigating the government of Christy Clark for her failed record on the environment. He denounced her LNG ambitions as fraudulent. He was steadfastly against construction of the Site C dam, which Ms. Clark championed, and the Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion, to which she ultimately gave her blessing, as well. He railed against the moral corruption inherent in campaign-finance laws that helped the Liberals fill their party coffers to overflowing.

Yes, he had supported some of their budgets. But in part that was intended to demonstrate the Greens applauded good fiscal stewardship, which the Liberals’ balance sheets over the past five years had certainly demonstrated. While the Green Party benefited from some Liberal protest votes in this recent election, it was not those people Mr. Weaver was worried about when it came to making a decision about what to do and who to join forces with in forming government.

He was worried about the Green base, the people making it clear to him how devastated they would be if he decided to prop up a party that had been in power 16 years.

Norman Spector, a political adviser to prime minister Brian Mulroney and B.C. premier Bill Bennett, was part of the Green Party negotiating team that reached a deal Monday to support a New Democratic Party government. He tweeted: “Ultimately, @BCGreens recoiled [sometimes physically] at the prospect of supporting a Liberal government.”

The Greens had much more in common with the NDP policy wise, and ideologically. That was always evident. While there might not have been instant chemistry between NDP Leader John Horgan and Mr. Weaver, it was never going to be enough of a problem to send the Green Leader running into the arms of Ms. Clark.

Now the fun begins.

We won’t know until Tuesday exactly what the NDP and the Greens have actually agreed to. Campaign-finance reform is a given. So is concerted opposition to Kinder Morgan. The two sides are hoping they can demonstrate that minority governments can work and, in the process, sell a skeptical public on the merits of electoral reform.

As for Ms. Clark, she sent out a statement saying she will consult with her caucus and decide on what to do. Her options would appear limited. Knowing she doesn’t have the numbers to keep a government afloat, she can either go see Judith Guichon, the Lieutenant-Governor, and inform her of this political fact and resign, or make the NDP-Green alliance defeat her government in a vote of no-confidence. The first opportunity for that would be the Speech from the Throne.

I’m not sure what Ms. Clark gains from forcing the issue in the legislature, but maybe it is worth it. Who knows, there could be some unforeseen incident that instantly changes the calculus. The Liberals have been in power a long time. They are not going to want to rush to give up the perks to which they’ve become accustomed. Ms. Clark had been saying that the election result was a signal from the public that it wanted politicians in Victoria to work across partisan lines. We’ll see how well that works assuming the NDP takes power with the help of the Greens.

Mr. Weaver and Mr. Horgan both said the hope is that they can keep a government going until the next election in four years. Good luck with that. Minority governments, most with more breathing room than the NDP has, typically last under two years. The NDP has a one-seat edge over the Liberals with the Greens’ three-seat help. That will undoubtedly restrict the scope and ambition of this government, which will always be one unexpected event away from falling.

They should, however, have enough time to bring in legislation that will have a long-lasting impact on the dynamic of B.C. politics, such as campaign-finance reform. The next election campaign in the province could look radically different than this recent one as a result of what took place in Victoria on Monday afternoon.

But it will not be all fun and games. Expectations in the province have already begun shifting. Mr. Horgan and Mr. Weaver hadn’t even publicly announced their deal when the NDP-friendly B.C. Teachers’ Federation sent out a news release asking for more money for the education system. And so it begins.

It’s easy to say yes when you’re in opposition. If the NDP does form government, it is going to need to start getting good at saying no.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/its-not-yet-a-done-deal-but-expectations-are-already-shifting-in-bc-politics/article35150983/
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 6699
Reputation: 239.2
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Tue May 30, 2017 7:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The ball is in B.C. Premier Christy Clark’s court, political scientists say


By Geordon Omand — May 29 2017


VANCOUVER — All eyes are on Premier Christy Clark after Monday's announcement that British Columbia's New Democrats have reached an agreement with the Green party to form a minority government, experts say.

NDP Leader John Horgan and Andrew Weaver of the Greens appeared outside the legislative chamber in Victoria to share the news. They said details of the agreement would be released Tuesday after the NDP caucus has had a chance to ratify the deal, which is expected to last four years.

"The ball is really in Christy Clark's court at this point," said Max Cameron, a political scientist at the University of British Columbia.

"The question will be, does she do the elegant thing, which would be to resign and let John Horgan and the NDP form the government ... or does she attempt to go it alone."

In a statement, Clark said her party has a responsibility to carefully consider its next steps and that she would have more to say Tuesday after consulting her caucus colleagues.

Weaver has been negotiating with both parties since his party held the balance of power in the legislature after the provincial election on May 9.

The Liberals won a plurality of seats with 43 compared to the NDP's 41 and three for the Greens, so parliamentary tradition gives Clark the first chance to form a government.

Prof. Hamish Telford, who teaches political science at the University of the Fraser Valley, explained that the NDP-Green collaboration was far from a done deal.

"Just because they have an agreement today to govern doesn't mean they will actually form a government," he said.

Telford pointed out how in 2008 the federal Liberals failed to form a government after approaching the governor general with a coalition agreement signed by the NDP, Bloc Quebecois and Green party to overthrow the Conservatives led by then-prime minister Stephen Harper.

Telford said he expects Clark to test her luck in the legislature with a throne speech rather than admit defeat, given the NDP and Greens only have one more seat between them than the Liberals.

"I don't think ... the NDP-Green majority is sufficiently great to cause her to concede," Telford said.

After all, he said it would only take one New Demcocrat to miss the ferry to Vancouver Island for the vote in the legislature in Victoria and "the Liberals could survive a confidence vote on the throne speech."

Clark would likely be defeated, Telford added. He predicted she would then approach Lt.-Gov. Judith Guichon to ask for another election, at which point it would be up to Guichon to decide whether to send voters back to the polls or ask Horgan to form a government.

"I don't know what she would do in those circumstances," Telford said.

A minority NDP government propped up by the Greens would have "the narrowest of majorities," said Kathryn Harrison, a political scientist at the University of British Columbia.

"There is no room for error. There is no room for backbenchers to bolt. There's no room for sickness," she said, adding that governments can lose a single vote any number of ways.

"People misbehave. They get thrown out of caucus. They get sick or resign. Rebellious backbenchers threaten to vote against legislation and break party discipline," Harrison said. "It would be a challenge to govern for very long."

Minority governments have only occurred three times in B.C. history, most recently in 1952.

— Follow @gwomand on Twitter

Geordon Omand, The Canadian Press

http://www.nationalnewswatch.c.....S1iwEn2Zjp
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 6699
Reputation: 239.2
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Tue May 30, 2017 7:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
I am not surprised at the outcome. Doesn't it make sense that the Greens would support the NDP in preference to the Liberals, particularly in a province where Liberals define the right end of the spectrum?

The problem is the terms. Are they forming an actual coalition? Or are they extracting terms for their support? It sounds like the latter, but the article doesn't say. And the new government's margin of victory is so small that a flu bug going around could bring down the government.

The Greens have 3 non-negotiable demands -- proportional representation being one of them. They want to stop the Kinder Morgan pipeline and stop a dam from being built. The dam is Christie Clark's pet project. I would be virtually impossible for the Liberals to get the support of the Greens without implicitly rejecting an important part of their own party's policy choices.



its unclear where this is all headed , my understanding is the BC liberals are still the government and Christy Clark still the premier as of today .

its unclear how the NDP would become the government if there not asked by LGovenor to try and form one .

would they have to wait for a confidence vote ? and then bring down the government ? and what happens if the BC liberals ask for a new election instead ?

its also unclear who will be the next speaker ? in a virtually tied parliament its a critically important decision as they could break ties

it seems like BC is in a coalition crisis similar to the one Ottawa saw in 2008 and its unclear who will get the chance to govern

the greens also want proportional representation and its unclear how such a system could be in place in 4 years ? my understanding was BC already had a referendum on that system and it was rejected in 2009 , 60 % against and only 40% in favour so how would they go about forcing this system on a province that clearly doesn't want it
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 6699
Reputation: 239.2
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Tue May 30, 2017 4:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Clark won't quit as B.C. premier, will recall house



Canadian Press

Tuesday, May 30th, 2017



VICTORIA — British Columbia Premier Christy Clark is not ready to walk away from office, announcing today that she will recall the legislature to see if she can get support to continue governing.

Clark was speaking for the first time since the NDP and Greens announced a deal on Monday to topple the Liberals from power after no party won a majority of seats in a provincial election three weeks ago.

Clark said she plans to bring the house back in early June and made the decision to test the will of the legislature after consulting constitutional experts.

The Liberals...


http://ipolitics.ca/2017/05/30.....all-house/
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 6699
Reputation: 239.2
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2017 6:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

B.C. legislature in 'uncharted territory' as it tussles with Speaker appointment


Geordon Omand — Canadian Press

Sunday, June 4th, 2017




VANCOUVER – The feigned reluctance of a newly elected Speaker who, following parliamentary tradition, pretends to resist being dragged to the head of the legislative chamber may soon be more than mock theatrics in the British Columbia legislature.

The narrow results of last month’s provincial election mean none of the three parties are eager to give up one of their voting members to take on the role of impartial arbiter of the house, and experts say an impasse could send voters back to the polls.

The Speaker’s role is to enforce the rules in the legislature and he or she only votes in the event of a tie, and even then only to maintain the status quo, as per tradition.

Gary Levy, former editor of the Canadian Parliamentary Review, said the absence of a Speaker would provoke a constitutional crisis.

“Basically, you have no parliament,” he said. “Nothing can occur until the a Speaker is elected, which is always the first order of business following an election.”

The May 9 election ended with the Liberals winning 43 seats, while the NDP took 41 and the Green party secured three. The NDP is proposing a minority New Democrat government propped up by the Greens with 44 seats, compared with 43 for the Opposition Liberals, before the Speaker is taken into account.

“It’s almost an untenable situation any way you look at it,” said Philippe Lagasse, a professor at Carleton University in Ottawa who studies the Westminster parliamentary system.

But there is “fluidity” around conventions, he added.

NDP Leader John Horgan, who has entered into an agreement with the Greens, said he would be open to having a Liberal Speaker, which would put him at a 44-42 advantage.

“Absolutely,” Horgan told reporters last week. “I want to make this minority parliament work.”

There is no rule that a Speaker has to come from the governing party.

But a Liberal party spokesman said their members all agreed not to take the job.

Matt James, who teaches political science at the University of Victoria, said it is hard to imagine why the Liberals would willingly offer a Speaker from their ranks just so the other side could have a working majority.

“Any Liberal who volunteered for the task would quickly become a pariah within Liberal circles,” he said.

If an NDP or a Green MLA is appointed Speaker, that leaves the house at a 43-43 tie before the predicted confidence vote. Despite coming from the Opposition benches, the unwritten rules of the house would demand that the Speaker vote to prop up the government, which in that case would be the Liberals under Premier Christy Clark.

In such an instance, a nominee for the position could openly state he or she would break with convention on this one occasion and, given the uniqueness of the situation, cast a deciding vote to bring down the government.

The deputy Speaker position poses another conundrum. Parliamentary rules require that proposed legislation go through a committee stage that is typically overseen by another member, usually the deputy Speaker, assistant deputy Speaker or deputy chair, and who in that role also only votes in the event of a tie. An NDP or Green in that position would give the Liberals a possible 43-42 majority, allowing them to amend bills as they wished.

“We’re largely into uncharted territory,” said Lorne Sossin, dean of Osgoode Hall Law School at York University in Toronto.

In Sossin’s view, it is incumbent on the Liberals to respect the will of the voters, who elected more NDP and Green members than Liberals, and to put forward one of their own as Speaker so as not to be obstructionist.

If an impasse results, the premier could go to Lt.-Gov. Judith Guichon and ask for another election, at which point Guichon could agree to dissolve the house or she could turn the premiership over to Horgan to take a crack at appointing a Speaker.

The most recent precedent cited by experts is from the Dominion of Newfoundland more than 100 years ago, explained Andrew Heard, a political scientist at Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, B.C.

In the 1908 election, two parties each won 18 seats. Neither side was willing to hand the opposing party a majority by giving up a member to become Speaker, so the lieutenant-governor was eventually forced to call another election.

The Speaker was originally the delegated go-between for parliament and the monarch in Britain. Historically, the monarch would occasionally express his displeasure at unwelcome news by beheading the Speaker, leading to today’s ritualistic reluctance to take on the position.

http://ipolitics.ca/2017/06/04.....pointment/
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 6699
Reputation: 239.2
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Thu Jun 08, 2017 7:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

B.C. legislature returns June 22, stage set for confidence vote on Liberals


By The Canadian Press — Jun 7 2017

VICTORIA — Politicians have been called back to the British Columbia legislature on June 22, setting the stage for a showdown between the ruling Liberals and two opposition parties that want to defeat them.

Premier Christy Clark has said she expects to lose a confidence vote in the house after the New Democrats and Greens reached an agreement to allow the NDP to form a minority government.

No party won a majority of seats in a provincial election last month. The Liberals won 43 seats in the 87-seat legislature, with the NDP winning 41 seats and the Greens three.

The results left Clark with a tenuous grip on power and spelled the likely end for the Liberals' 16 years in government.

Government House Leader Mike de Jong said the first order of business will be to elect a Speaker.

"After which, and in the aftermath of a very close election, the government will seek to determine if it continues to enjoy the confidence of the house," he said in a statement Wednesday.

New Democrat Leader John Horgan questioned why Clark had not recalled the legislature earlier.

"By the time Christy Clark finally gets to work on June 22, it will be more than six weeks since British Columbians voted overwhelmingly to replace her," he said in a statement.

"I'm hopeful she will agree to test the confidence of the house immediately so British Columbians get the new government they voted for."

Green Leader Andrew Weaver also welcomed the announcement in a statement.

"I'm glad that the premier has finally decided to recall the legislature," Weaver said. "In the weeks since the election, it has been encouraging to see all three parties agree that British Columbians want us to work together."

The first order of business — electing a Speaker — is a tall one. The narrow election results mean none of the three parties are eager to give up one of their voting members to take on the impartial role.

"I rather suspect they're all going to file in, take their seats and stare at each other for a while," said Hamish Telford, a political scientist at the University of the Fraser Valley.

The Speaker enforces the rules in the legislature and only votes in the event of a tie, and even then only to maintain the status quo, as per tradition.

All members of the legislature who are not cabinet ministers are eligible to be Speaker, Telford said.

Telford said he expects Clark to announce a cabinet before June 22 and she could appoint potential Speakers from her party to cabinet, such as former Speaker Linda Reid, to make them ineligible for the job.

When there has been an impasse over the Speaker, legislatures have been dissolved and another election held, he said.

But if a Speaker is chosen, the government would introduce a throne speech, Telford said. There would be a reply from the Opposition, a debate and then a confidence vote.

If the Speaker comes from the Liberals, it's likely the government will be defeated. If the Speaker is a New Democrat, a tie is expected, he said.

Telford said in that case, he thinks the Speaker would likely break with convention and vote against the Liberal government.

"I have yet to find a case anywhere in the Commonwealth where a Speaker has voted in such a way that it leads to the defeat of the government," he said. "That's not to say there hasn't been a case, but I haven't found one."

— By Laura Kane in Vancouver.

The Canadian Press

Note to readers: This is a corrected story. A previous version said the election was two months ago.

http://www.nationalnewswatch.c.....Tk-fUn2Zjp
Post new topic   Reply to topic Page 1 of 1

  


 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You cannot download files in this forum


BC Greens to support an NDP minority government

phpBBCopyright 2001, 2005 phpBB