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RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
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PostPosted: Mon May 01, 2017 12:25 pm    Post subject: new poll - More now Disapprove of Trudeau than Approve Reply with quote

( an interesting new poll from Forum shows trudeau's approval rating is slipping and more disapprove than approve of his performance )


More Now Disapprove of Trudeau Than Approve

April 27, 2017 @ 7:11 AM | Filed under: National



More Now Disapprove of Trudeau Than Approve

Liberals and Conservatives tied, but Liberals still edge out a minority

Toronto, April 26th – In a random sampling of public opinion taken by The Forum Poll™ amongst 1479 Canadian voters, amongst those decided and leaning, the Liberals (35%) and the Conservatives (35%) are tied. The NDP is third (17%), with the Green Party (7%) and the BQ (5%) following behind. (1%) say they support another party.

Liberal support is down one point since March (36%: March 24th), Conservative support is down three points (38%: March 24th), NDP support is up two points (15%: March 24th), Green Party support has almost doubled (4%: March 24th), and BQ support is down one point (5%).

Liberal minority if election held today

If an election were held today, the Conservatives would win 137 seats, the Liberals 152, the NDP 36, the BQ 12, and 1 for the Green.

The drop in Conservative support since March is matched by a commensurate drop in potential seats, which sees their total reduced by 33, with the BQ down 1. The Liberals see an increase of 22, the NDP an increase of 10, with Green unchanged at 1.

Trudeau sees a negative net favourable score

Trudeau’s disapproval (47%) now exceeds his approval (42%), a net favourable score (approve minus disapprove) of -5, which a stark contrast from six months ago when his score was positively in double digits. (10%) say they don’t know whether they approve or disapprove.

Rona Ambrose sees an approval of (32%) and a disapproval (23%), showing a net favourable score of +9. Almost half of respondents say they do not (45%) whether to approve or disapprove.

Tom Mulcair sees an approval of (32%) but his disapproval is higher than that of Ambrose (29%), but his net favourable is still positive at +3. Almost 4-in-10 (39%) say they do not know whether to approve or disapprove.

Despite his negative favourable, Trudeau still seen as best PM

Almost a third see Justin Trudeau (32%) as the best PM. Only (12%) see Rona Ambrose, and (10%) see Tom Mulcair as the best candidate for PM.

None of these is the top second choice (22%), followed by do not know (15%).

“Justin Trudeau’s level of approval should be of concern to Liberals across the country, as the once irrepressibly popular Prime Minister now sees his disapproval exceed his approval. Perhaps it’s the aftermath of an unpopular budget, or just a general lack of interest that comes with the middle of a mandate, but, whatever the cause, Trudeau doesn’t seem to be connecting with Canadians right now,” said Dr. Lorne Bozinoff, President of Forum Research.



Lorne Bozinoff, Ph.D. is the president and founder of Forum Research. He can be reached at lbozinoff@forumresearch.com or at (416) 960-9603.

http://poll.forumresearch.com/.....unpopular/
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Tue May 02, 2017 1:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Prime Minister was spotted a two year period without any real accountability;

Of the opposition parties that have party status, none of them have permanent leadership and won't till the Tories select a leader later this month.

Even the BQ was largely leaderless till Martine Ouellet was acclaimed in March.

While Ambrose and Mulcair have done respectable jobs in their roles, you only really have so much ability to forward an agenda when you are there for a limited period of time.

While the Prime Ministers approval is down;
His party party support is still largely strong and it will be interesting to see if the election of leaders for the CPC and NDP effect that index in the near term.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Tue May 02, 2017 3:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Do you really think that Question Period is enough to hold this gang accountable? I take your point, that it ought to be possible to turn up the heat on them somewhat.

It's different if there is something to use to attack the administration with. But there isn't very much, mostly because he can use his celebrity to take the media attention off of problems.

The enduring Conservative problem is the genuine journalistic hostility they face from the media. These people repeatedly use code language to designate the villains ... 'right wing'' or éxtreme right wing', for example. Everyone knows that's code language for the Nazis! And Conservatives are 'right wing'', are they not?

It seems to me that the first step in winning government is the leader of the opposition to convince the media of the Conservative Party's mission.
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed May 03, 2017 7:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
Do you really think that Question Period is enough to hold this gang accountable? I take your point, that it ought to be possible to turn up the heat on them somewhat.

It's different if there is something to use to attack the administration with. But there isn't very much, mostly because he can use his celebrity to take the media attention off of problems.

The enduring Conservative problem is the genuine journalistic hostility they face from the media. These people repeatedly use code language to designate the villains ... 'right wing'' or éxtreme right wing', for example. Everyone knows that's code language for the Nazis! And Conservatives are 'right wing'', are they not?

It seems to me that the first step in winning government is the leader of the opposition to convince the media of the Conservative Party's mission.



question period has always been one of the better tools available for an opposition , although its not necessary as high profile as it was in the past . I imagine it got better ratings when the sponsorship scandal was in full swing than what its getting now


I agree the media is hostile , outlets like the Toronto star have core liberal beliefs and it be foolish to think that is going to change based on who wins the cpc leadership . the star is still trying to build a case for why wynne should be re-elected even though she is the most unpopular premier the province has seen in years

other more conservative friendly outlets like postmedia have serious financial issues and if they don't turn things around , some of those newspapers may not even be publishing by the next federal elections
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
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Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Wed May 03, 2017 8:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
The Prime Minister was spotted a two year period without any real accountability;

Of the opposition parties that have party status, none of them have permanent leadership and won't till the Tories select a leader later this month.

Even the BQ was largely leaderless till Martine Ouellet was acclaimed in March.

While Ambrose and Mulcair have done respectable jobs in their roles, you only really have so much ability to forward an agenda when you are there for a limited period of time.

While the Prime Ministers approval is down;
His party party support is still largely strong and it will be interesting to see if the election of leaders for the CPC and NDP effect that index in the near term.



I think its clear the may reason trudeau won in 2015 was because of harper and the anti harper vote .

but now that harpers gone , they haven't been able to come up with much of an agenda . it appears to me a lot of liberals wanted fancy positions and high paying jobs , with access to expense accounts and trips all over the world .

but there isn't much of an overall agenda or exactly clear what there main goals are this parliament . there has been few significant pieces of legislation this parliament and doesn't appear many are coming either . the marijuana issue generated a lot of press but is just one of those issues that people like to talk about . its not really evidence of an actual agenda .

what should concern the liberals is there hasn't even been any scandals in the news this spring and trudeau's numbers are still going down . late last year , cash for access and others were in the news . but this spring things have been rather quiet as cpc focused on leadership race . its hard to explain why someones doing worse when there hasn't been a lot of bad press
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed May 03, 2017 10:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bingo, RCO. You catch it exactly -- the Liberals are (for the most part) a bunch of apparatchiks who rollick on government expense accounts, and trips to exotic nations for 'climate conferences' or 'economic councils'. Best of all -- trade missions! "Oh, I tell you Mr. Taxpayer, what they do with shrimp in Japan is amazing! A-maze-ing."

This is why I reacted so strongly when Trudeau ordered up three nannies and took 400 people to Paris with him. It was like an announcement party, where it was announced that the good old days had returned. And the wallets were so eagerly unzipped.

I think the Liberals do have an agenda, and it has to do with the environment, as in saving it. We will do well to keep this gang away from energy policy, where they will inevitably make the worst possible decisions. And they have to keep it secret if they are to have half a chance to implement their ideas.
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu May 04, 2017 7:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
Bingo, RCO. You catch it exactly -- the Liberals are (for the most part) a bunch of apparatchiks who rollick on government expense accounts, and trips to exotic nations for 'climate conferences' or 'economic councils'. Best of all -- trade missions! "Oh, I tell you Mr. Taxpayer, what they do with shrimp in Japan is amazing! A-maze-ing."

This is why I reacted so strongly when Trudeau ordered up three nannies and took 400 people to Paris with him. It was like an announcement party, where it was announced that the good old days had returned. And the wallets were so eagerly unzipped.

I think the Liberals do have an agenda, and it has to do with the environment, as in saving it. We will do well to keep this gang away from energy policy, where they will inevitably make the worst possible decisions. And they have to keep it secret if they are to have half a chance to implement their ideas.



the liberals are happy cause there in power and now have access to everything they wanted and all the fancy positions . its just an overall agenda is lacking , perhaps there focused on the environment but we'd have a difficult time naming any high profile environmental legislation passed this parliament .

trudeau is someone who appears to aspire to be PM for some time but he doesn't have a long term agenda to back up those aspirations . he doesn't really have much of an agenda at all , other than to undo some of the bills harper actually got passed last parliament if that constitutes a real agenda . overall he's mostly just responding to what trump is doing on issues like pipelines and free trade .
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Thu May 04, 2017 9:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:

I think its clear the may reason trudeau won in 2015 was because of harper and the anti harper vote.


Its a chicken and egg situation here;
Why was Harper unpopular heading into the 2015 election?
Canadians were paying less in Federal Taxes on his last day in office than his first and the books were balanced.

Isn't that the gold standard of governance?

Trudeau's win has a lot to do with the effectiveness of their campaign.
They sold the idea that
"Harper is mean and surrounded by corrupt MPs who spent eight dollars on Orange Juice and is a tyrannical dictator who muzzles science and his MPs."

It worked.
It worked so well that in Eastern Canada CPC support was decimated that region served Trudeau his majority.

RCO wrote:
it appears to me a lot of liberals wanted fancy positions and high paying jobs , with access to expense accounts and trips all over the world


Of course;

We went from millions of taxpayers dollars bring routed into the Liberal Party via Adscam being consider a scandal to Bev Oda spending eight bucks on OJ while traveling abroad being a worthy two week discussion on government corruption back to tens of thousands of dollars being spent on photographers being considered acceptable government expenditures within a little more than ten years.

While I hate generalizing;
This isn't exactly uncharacteristic of the Liberals.

RCO wrote:
what should concern the liberals is there hasn't even been any scandals in the news this spring and trudeau's numbers are still going down . late last year , cash for access and others were in the news . but this spring things have been rather quiet as cpc focused on leadership race . its hard to explain why someones doing worse when there hasn't been a lot of bad press


The first polls of July/August will be the most telling as it pertains to how uphill the climb will be in 2019.

The month after a divided leadership campaign usually sees the resulting winner take a polling hit but as those who are upset with not getting their first choice conclude that leader X isn't your first choice, but is stilll your first choice over Trudeau the numbers will be clearer.

IMO the CPC needs to be within six points and ahead or tied in Ontario to have a strong chance to build on momentum,
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu May 04, 2017 1:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sunny ways fading as the Liberals hit the halfway mark in their mandate: Hébert


While the parties wrangle, the Liberals struggle to advance their legislative agenda. Not that it is particularly impressive. The spring sitting will mostly be remembered for broken or missing-in-action promises.



For all the talk about running a more collegial operation, Justin Trudeau’s Liberal government is as centralized as its predecessors. Nothing much happens without a green light from the PMO, writes Chantal Hébert.



By Chantal HébertNational Affairs Columnist

Wed., May 3, 2017




OTTAWA—So much for sunny ways! As Justin Trudeau’s government nears the halfway mark of its first mandate, finding some willingness to engage in adult conversation on either side of the House of Commons is almost as hard as it was on the worst days of the previous Conservative government.

Since the new year, the tone has steadily deteriorated, and if this week is anything to go by the climate is bound to become more toxic until Parliament finally breaks for the summer.

In question period, debate has essentially defaulted to a dialogue of the deaf that allows for little or no reasoned arguments. The opposition squawks loudly at a flock of government parrots.

This week the government rescheduled a Conservative opposition day from Thursday to next Monday. The official Opposition wants to use the time to turn up the heat on Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan for having aggrandized his role in the planning of a major military offensive in Afghanistan. Conservatives and New Democrats have spent the week calling for his resignation. The Liberals hope that by next week the story will have run out of steam.

All this is unfolding against the backdrop of a procedural war over a clumsy Liberal attempt to tweak some of the rules of the House to the government’s advantage. Such is the bad blood between the opposition and the Liberals that when the latter waved a white flag and abandoned their most contentious proposals, none of the other parties would pause long enough to claim victory.


While the parties wrangle, the government struggles to advance its legislative agenda. Not that it is particularly impressive. The spring sitting will mostly be remembered for broken or missing-in-action Liberal promises.

Take Trudeau’s commitment to give the Parliamentary Budget Officer more independence. The legislation brought forward by the government would instead further clip the already short wings of the PBO.

The malaise that has overtaken Parliament Hill has root causes on both sides of the House.


•For all the talk about running a more collegial operation, Trudeau’s government is as centralized as its predecessors. Nothing much happens without a green light from the PMO.


Since Donald Trump’s election, Trudeau’s inner circle has had its hands full trying to keep up with the changing moods of the American president. Just last week the prime minister’s top aides — Katie Telford and Gerald Butts — flew to Washington in a hurry to take stock and, if possible, mitigate a Trump-induced NAFTA storm.

But while Trudeau’s brain trust is watching the White House, it can’t always have its eye on the many other balls that a cabinet dominated by political rookies is liable to drop.

•Liberal strategists believe the price to pay for having dumped the commitment to change the voting system will not be high in the next election. Perhaps, but they may have underestimated the parliamentary cost of squandering a serious amount of opposition goodwill and trust in the process.


Trudeau’s reversal accounts for part of the cement that binds the New Democrats to the Conservatives in the opposition battle against the Liberal rule changes.

•With the election of Stephen Harper’s successor less than a month away, the Conservatives are not looking to tie the hands of their next leader. While they pile on an embattled minister or engage in procedural warfare, they are spared having to come up with a caucus consensus on divisive issues like the future of Canada’s supply management approach to dairy and poultry, or the government’s cannabis legislation.


Over on the NDP side Thomas Mulcair’s prolonged last hurrah as party leader is turning into an outlet for a lot of pent-up anger. Much of it is directed at Trudeau, a counterpart that Mulcair saw as a political weakling when they sat side by side in opposition and, by all indications, still sees him that way now that he is prime minister. The animosity between the two is not just for show.

With every passing week Mulcair’s tone seems to become more strident — to the point that it sometimes overtakes the substance of his arguments. On Tuesday, the NDP leader had to apologize for calling Liberal House leader Bardish Chagger a buffoon.

As counterintuitive as it may seem, it may take the arrival of two permanent opposition leaders to bring a small measure of sunnier ways back to Parliament Hill.



Chantal Hébert is a national affairs writer. Her column appears Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.

https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2017/05/03/sunny-ways-fading-as-the-liberals-hit-the-halfway-mark-in-their-mandate-hbert.html
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new poll - More now Disapprove of Trudeau than Approve

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