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RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
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Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Mon May 01, 2017 9:13 pm    Post subject: Conservatives raise more than liberals in first quarter Reply with quote

( whatever success the liberals were having fundraising it seems to have come to an end , I think there supporters expect the government to give them free money not the other way around . cpc numbers are crazy considering they raised all that money during a leadership race . the ndp seems to be entering hopeless territory with those numbers )


Conservative party out-fundraises the Liberals, despite leadership contest


By Joan Bryden , The Canadian Press — May 1 2017

OTTAWA — The federal Conservatives showed off their fundraising prowess during the first three months of the year, raking in almost twice as much as the governing Liberals despite being in the midst of a leadership contest that could be siphoning off potential donations to the party.

When the leadership contestants' money haul is added in, the Conservatives raised more than three times the Liberal take.

According to financial returns filed with Elections Canada for the first quarter of 2017, the Conservative party pulled in $5.3 million from almost 42,500 donors, compared to just $2.8 million from 31,812 donors who gave to the Liberals.

Tory leadership contenders took in another $4.6 million, with front-runner Maxime Bernier raking in the most: $1.031 million, just barely ahead of celebrity candidate Kevin O'Leary, who pulled out of the race last week and threw his support to Bernier.

O'Leary raised $1.029 million. Kellie Leitch was a distant third with $536,418, followed by Erin O'Toole with $424,346, Andrew Scheer with $403,014 , Michael Chong with $283,978, Pierre Lemieux with $237,693, Lisa Raitt with $208,368 and Brad Trost with $120,893.

The other five contenders each pulled in less than $100,000.

The NDP continued to lag well behind the Conservatives and Liberals, raising just less than $909,000 from 13,404 donors.

New Democrat leadership contenders raised an additional $252,664. Of the four declared candidates so far, Charlie Angus led the pack with $110,765, followed by Niki Ashton with $65,521, Guy Caron with $57,235 and Peter Julian with $19,143.

Since winning power in 2015, the Liberals have been giving Conservatives, long the undisputed fundraising champions, a run for their money. They've virtually matched or slightly exceeded the Tory donations in most quarterly fundraising reports.

The first quarter results for 2017 appears to signal renewed interest in the Conservative party as its leadership race heads for the finish line later this month.

In the past, leadership contests have been known to siphon off money that would otherwise have gone to party coffers. But that certainly doesn't appear to be happening this time.



Joan Bryden , The Canadian Press

http://www.nationalnewswatch.c.....QfqK0n2Zjq
Bugs





Joined: 16 Dec 2009
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PostPosted: Tue May 02, 2017 1:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is a tremendous sign. It feels like there is a real energy behind the Conservatives, even though the thoughts being bandied about are significant conservative reforms of institutions. (Taking apart the supply-management cartels is one thing that history seems to be putting on the table, for good or bad.)

For the Conservatives to lead in party fund-raising while giving generously to the leading individual candidates (at least) is really significant. Morale must be high.

Sad about the NDP though.
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
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PostPosted: Wed May 03, 2017 6:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Liberals are losing the money war. Should they panic?

iPolitics Insights

It could be a sign that many Trudeau supporters are drifting away from him

Susan Delacourt



Tuesday, May 2nd, 2017


Prime Minister Justin Trudeau sent out a lot of emails last week, each one sounding more needy than the last.

Now we know why: The latest Elections Canada fundraising reports reveal that the first three months of this year were grim for the governing Liberals — especially in comparison to their Conservative rivals.

Even without a permanent leader, the Conservatives hauled in nearly double the dollars that the Liberals did from January to the end of March, from an impressive 10,000 more contributors. And that’s not even counting the money and the donors being amassed in the Conservative leadership race.

“Whoever the Conservative party chooses, their new leader will have access to the millions of dollars their party has been raising,” Trudeau (or more likely a Liberal staffer) wrote in one fundraising email pitch last week.

That’s not an exaggeration. The Conservatives raised $5.3 million from about 42,000 contributors in the first quarter of 2017; the Liberals gathered up $2.8 million from roughly 32,000 donors over the same time period.

The entire field of Conservative leadership contenders, meanwhile, managed to wring another $4 million out of Canadians in the first three months of this year. That’s right. Conservative leadership contenders have out-fundraised the entire, governing Liberal Party of Canada so far in 2017.

Liberals might be tempted to write this off as the usual flurry of cash and excitement that surrounds leadership contests. But that wasn’t the case four years ago, when the tables were turned and the Liberals were choosing a leader with the Conservatives still in power.

In the first three months of 2013, leading up to the Liberal leadership convention in early April that elected Trudeau, the party raised about $1.7 million. Conservatives raised $4.4 million during that same quarter. Since then, the Conservatives have lost power without, apparently, losing their knack for out-fundraising the Liberals.

One of Trudeau’s email appeals last week also made reference to those heady days in 2013 when he assumed the leadership of the party (it seems like yesterday and, also, a long time ago).

“Today we find ourselves on that same timeline — 30 months before another election campaign in 2019,” the email said, urging would-be supporters to deposit their dollars into a new ’30-Month Fund’.

The fundraising gap with the Conservatives is no doubt the subject of many heated discussions in the corridors of federal power. Is this just a temporary blip, the doldrums of power — or an early warning about that power in peril?

open quote 761b1bBetween the last quarterly report and the latest one, Trudeau’s expensive vacations were in the news. It might be hard to argue now that the leader needs money when he’s jetting off to private islands.

We also learned this week that the Liberal government is planning to introduce legislation soon to govern fundraising by political parties and leadership contestants — another sign that this business of pulling in cash is much on the minds of the Trudeau crew these days.

“We will be bringing forward legislation to give Canadians information about fundraisers involving cabinet ministers, party leaders, and leadership contestants. Canadians will know about the events in advance, where they are being held, the cost to attend, and they will know who attended them,” Democratic Institutions Minister Karina Gould told the Commons on Monday. Gould’s office wasn’t offering any more information beyond promising that details would be coming “soon.”

The legislation is obviously a response, at least in part, to the controversy over so-called “cash-for-access” Liberal events that dominated the Commons for much of last fall.

If you’re wondering whether that’s a possible explanation for the dip in Liberal fundraising fortunes … well, do the math. In the last three months of 2016, the Liberals raised $5.8 million from about 46,000 contributors, compared to $4.6 million for the Conservatives and their 36,000 donors.

It’s quite possible that the drip-drip-drip of news stories about the Liberals’ fundraising events late last year left people with the impression that the party was rolling in dough, and thus not in dire need of citizens’ contributions. Or potential donors may have decided not to reward what they saw as bad behaviour.

We probably shouldn’t ignore the Donald Trump effect either. Trump’s surprise election victory last November may have helped Liberals in the immediate term late in 2016, with shell-shocked progressives keen to contribute to any cause seen as anti-Trump.

But there’s also no doubt that, over the longer term, Trump’s victory has given a jolt of adrenaline to conservative-leaning folks — a sign that progressive parties can be defeated.

Trudeau’s Liberals, we’ll remember, have been working closely for years with Democrats in the United States, trading tips on raising funds and building support. That alliance doesn’t look half as clever in 2017 as it did before the U.S. election; the plummet in Liberals’ contributions may be a sign that they’re in need of new inspiration and new tactics.

And what was Trudeau doing for much of the first three months of this year? He was paying attention to Trump, trying to stay on the president’s good side and preserve Canada’s “special relationship” with the United States. Perhaps this single-minded focus on the United States was off-putting to potential Liberal donors and the support that Trudeau had cultivated on the progressive left.

There are a variety of other, more domestic reasons for the fundraising decline, too. Between the last quarterly report and the latest one, Trudeau’s expensive vacations were in the news. It might be hard to argue now that the leader needs money when he’s jetting off to private islands.

One also can’t rule out the possibility that Trudeau probably cost himself some support by breaking his electoral-reform promise in early 2017 (I’ve heard from Liberal voters who cut their contributions for that reason alone).

Whatever the reason, this latest fundraising report will be casting a shadow over sunny-ways politics. Somehow, I suspect we’ll be seeing a lot more emails from Justin Trudeau in the next fundraising quarter.

http://ipolitics.ca/2017/05/02.....hey-panic/
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed May 03, 2017 8:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
This is a tremendous sign. It feels like there is a real energy behind the Conservatives, even though the thoughts being bandied about are significant conservative reforms of institutions. (Taking apart the supply-management cartels is one thing that history seems to be putting on the table, for good or bad.)

For the Conservatives to lead in party fund-raising while giving generously to the leading individual candidates (at least) is really significant. Morale must be high.

Sad about the NDP though.



its looking like the by elections were financial disasters for the liberals , although they won the 3 in eastern Canada . the cpc used them as a successful fundraising tool , I remember getting a few calls asking for money to help the candidates but seeing how much money the cpc has , clearly it wasn't an issue and they raised way more than they could of even spent in them

I'm sure the 5 by elections are a main reason why the cpc raised so much this quarter as they had been a main part of there fundraising pitch

whatever reasons the liberals and ndp were not able to get there donors excited about donating money this quarter , even the by elections didn't seem to help
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Thu May 04, 2017 9:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Having money is important;
Using effectively is equally important.

The CPC has had the largest warchest walking into every election since 2006;
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Conservatives raise more than liberals in first quarter

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