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RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
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PostPosted: Mon May 01, 2017 7:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the low key BC election has moved along quickly and advance polls have already started )


Advance polls open for B.C. election on Saturday


Susan Lazaruk
(Vancouver Sun)

Published: April 27, 2017

Updated: April 28, 2017 3:54 PM


Advance polls open Saturday, April 29, for the May 9 British Columbia election.




You may not be able to vote often, but you can vote early.

Advance voting polls for the B.C. election open for the first time this weekend.

Voters can cast their ballot ahead of the May 9 general election on one of six days at advance polls, up from four days in the 2013 election.

The polls will be open on Saturday and Sunday as well as Wednesday through next Saturday, May 6, according to a release from Elections B.C.

The polls will be open 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. on those days, but “voters should note that not all advance voting places are open every day of the advance voting period,” said Elections B.C.

The polls and the dates and times they are open are listed on the Where to Vote app, available through elections.bc.ca/wtv.

A complete list is available at elections.bc.ca/2017-provincial-general-election/where-to-vote.

All advance votes are included in the initial count of votes in the proper electoral district on election night.

The statistics for advance voting will be published the day after each day of advance voting at elections.bc.ca/resources/statistics/.

In the last provincial election, about 20 per cent of the votes, or 366,558 votes, were cast in advance.

Voters are asked to bring their Where to Vote card and acceptable voter ID with them to the polls.

A list of acceptable voter ID is available on the Elections B.C. website at elections.bc.ca/2017-general-election/voter-id.

On May 9, polls will be open between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. and votes can also be cast at district electoral offices until 4 p.m. that day, said the release.

For more information, visit the Elections B.C. website at elections.bc.ca.

http://www.theprovince.com/new.....story.html
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon May 01, 2017 7:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

B.C. election campaign enters final push

The Canadian Press

May 1, 2017 01:00 AM

VANCOUVER — The final push for votes has begun, with just eight days left in British Columbia's election campaign.

The leaders of all the main political parties were out on the hustings yesterday, trying to get out their message and shore up votes ahead of election day on May 9.B.C. Liberal Leader Christy Clark campaigned in the Kootenays, telling residents her party is the only one that will protect jobs in resource industries like forestry and mining.


Meanwhile, New Democrat Leader John Horgan made stops around the Lower Mainland, speaking about his party's pledge to make life more affordable for British Columbians.One man at an NDP event heckled Horgan, saying his endless promises will bankrupt the province, but the leader responded by saying his party's platform is fully costed and that he would be happy to speak with the man about his concerns.

Green Leader Andrew Weaver spent time in the Interior yesterday, joining a rally in Kamloops. -


See more at: http://www.timescolonist.com/b.....gbZa9.dpuf
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue May 02, 2017 7:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

118,270 advance ballots cast in upcoming B.C. election

voting elections bc
A ballot is cast in the B.C. election. (Elections BC)


CTV Vancouver
Published Monday, May 1, 2017 11:10AM PDT
Last Updated Monday, May 1, 2017 12:33PM PDT


Elections BC says it was a busy weekend as thousands of British Columbians cast their ballots in advance polls in the run-up to the provincial election May 9.

Advance polls were open in B.C.'s 87 electoral ridings on Saturday and Sunday.

On Saturday, a total of 118,270 ballots were cast. Sunday's totals will be made available later in the day.


B.C. Election 2017

Headlines and resources: B.C. Election 2017

Here's a look at the breakdown of advance turnout by electoral district.

Advance voting will be available again Wednesday through Saturday with locations open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

In the 2013 B.C. election, 366,558 ballots were cast in the four days of advance voting.

http://bc.ctvnews.ca/118-270-a.....-1.3392877
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue May 02, 2017 8:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

May 1, 2017 8:31 am Updated: May 1, 2017 8:32 am

B.C. Election: Liberals and NDP in tight race according to new Ipsos poll

jill slattery By Jill Slattery
Online Producer Global News


Just over one week before B.C. voters head to the polls, a new poll is breaking down how British Columbians feel about each party — and the numbers suggest the BC Liberals and the BC NDP are in a tight race.

Monday’s poll comes almost three weeks after the last Ipsos poll on April 11 and shows the Liberals and the NDP in a statistical tie among decided voters.


According to the poll, the Liberals now have a two-point lead over the NDP. Currently, 43 per cent of decided voters say they would be most likely to support or lean towards the Liberals, while 41 per cent favour the NDP. Since the start of the campaign, the BC Liberals have moved up four points, while the NDP has lost points (was 44 per cent NDP to 39 per cent Liberals).

The BC Green Party currently has the support of 14 per cent of decided voters, which is up two points from the start of the campaign, according to the poll. The Green party remains set to benefit the most from potential vote switching.

Twenty per cent of voters say they are undecided or expressed no preference towards any political party.

The survey did provide some hope for parties trying to unseat the Liberals with 51 per cent of respondents saying they felt it was “time for another provincial party to take over.”

Over half as many respondents, 29 per cent, said the current provincial “government has done a good job and deserves re-election.”

Those results showed a marked improvement for BC Liberal leader Christy Clark and the Liberals, with the number of voters hoping for another party to take over the government dropping by five points since the last poll.

But the race between BC NDP leader John Horgan and Clark is closest when it comes to which leader would make the best premier. Just a three-point difference separates the two, with Clark in the lead.

Most notable is the rise of BC Green leader Andrew Weaver and the BC Greens over the last several weeks. Fifteen per cent of respondents said Weaver would make the best premier, giving him a four-point boost over April’s poll.

But if British Columbians were to put their bet on which government would take office on May 9, the Liberals come out on top with 35 per cent. The NDP made large gains over the previous poll in that category, up seven points to 29 per cent.

As for which issues people believe deserve the greatest attention from the party leaders, health care tops the list (36 per cent), followed by housing affordability (32 per cent) and jobs and employment (19 per cent).

Horgan was chosen as most capable at tackling health care (35 per cent compared to Clark’s 22 per cent) and housing affordability (35 per cent compared to Clark’s 17 per cent).

Clark and the Liberals are rewarded for consistently pushing jobs during campaign stops, earning the place of best party to take on jobs and employment (33 per cent over Horgan’s 27 per cent).

Economy (16 per cent) and social issues, like poverty and homelessness, (15 per cent) rounded out the top five most important issues. Of the five issues, respondents only preferred Clark over Horgan on the issues of jobs/employment and economy.

The the tightness of the election race is most clearly shown by which candidate respondents felt won the televised debate on April 27.

Each candidate earned exactly 25 per cent of the vote.

Exclusive Global News Ipsos polls are protected by copyright. The information and/or data may only be rebroadcast or republished with full and proper credit and attribution to “Global News Ipsos.” This poll was conducted between April 27 and 30, 2017 with a sample of 834 British Columbians.

The poll was conducted online via the Ipsos I-Say Panel. These data were statistically weighted by region, age, gender and education to ensure the sample composition reflects that of the actual BC population according to Census data. The precision of Ipsos polls containing online data is measured using a credibility interval. In this case, the overall poll is accurate to within +/ – 3.9 percentage points, 19 times out of 20, had all eligible voters been polled. The credibility interval will be wider among subsets of the population. All sample surveys and polls may be subject to other sources of error, including, but not limited to coverage error, and measurement error.

http://globalnews.ca/news/3416.....psos-poll/
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed May 03, 2017 6:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

231,034 advance ballots cast in upcoming B.C. election

voting elections bc
A ballot is cast in the B.C. election. (Elections BC)


CTV Vancouver
Published Monday, May 1, 2017 11:10AM PDT
Last Updated Tuesday, May 2, 2017 10:31AM PDT


Elections BC says it was a busy weekend as thousands of British Columbians cast their ballots in advance polls in the run-up to the provincial election May 9.

Advance polls were open in B.C.'s 87 electoral ridings on Saturday and Sunday.

A total of 231,034 ballots were cast on Saturday and Sunday.



Here's a look at the breakdown of advance turnout by electoral district.

Advance voting will be available again Wednesday through Saturday with locations open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

In the 2013 B.C. election, 366,558 ballots were cast in the four days of advance voting.



http://bc.ctvnews.ca/231-034-a.....-1.3392877
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed May 03, 2017 8:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the bc liberals are in danger of losing the election to the ndp , polling is very close and ndp has a slight lead . the advance polls have already started and many have voted , a forum poll just released shows an even bigger ndp lead )


B.C. Election 2017: NDP continues to lead Liberals in final days, latest poll shows


Published on: May 3, 2017 | Last Updated: May 3, 2017 5:00 AM PDT


VANCOUVER, B.C. APRIL 26, 2017 -- From left, B.C. Liberal Leader Christy Clark, Green party Leader Andrew Weaver and NDP Leader John Horgan pose before the televised leaders debate on April 26, 2017. Photo: B.C. Broadcast Consortium [PNG Merlin Archive]

From left, B.C. Liberal Leader Christy Clark, Green party Leader Andrew Weaver and NDP Leader John Horgan pose before the televised leaders debate on April 26. A new poll still has Horgan's NDP in the lead, but it's not an insurmountable one.


While the NDP continues to lead in the polls, there’s still a chance that the Liberals could see another election victory if the NDP’s support falters.

According to the latest Mainstreet Research poll, some 35 per cent of respondents across B.C. said they would vote for the NDP, while 31 per cent said they’d throw their support behind the Liberals. Just 17 per cent said they’d vote for the Greens, while another 18 per cent remained undecided.



NDP Leader John Horgan registers a virtually equal favourable (35%) vs. unfavourable (34%) rating as a prospective premier in the latest Mainstreet poll. DARRYL DYCK / THE CANADIAN PRESS

However, the NDP must protect their lead in the Lower Mainland if they hope to form government. Mainstreet president Quito Maggi noted the Greens continued to challenge the NDP’s support on Vancouver Island and if that results in the NDP losing steam, it could open the way for Liberal incumbents to secure a re-election.

“The backdrop to all this is voters still don’t like Christy Clark,” said Maggi. “John Horgan’s negatives have risen faster than his positives, leaving him with a bare plus-one, net-approval score. While voters have good impressions of Andrew Weaver — not enough of them may vote for his party on election day in a concentrated enough manner for a large number of new seats.”

Respondents were also asked to weigh in with their perceptions of the leaders, so while there may be support for a party, the poll found that it didn’t necessarily translate to support for each party’s leader.

More than half of respondents (58 per cent) said they had an unfavourable opinion of Clark, while 27 per cent said the opposite. Another 12 per cent weren’t sure and still three per cent admitted they weren’t familiar with Clark.

In comparison, an equal amount of people had favourable (35 per cent) and unfavourable (34 per cent) opinions toward Horgan. Some 26 per cent said they weren’t sure and six per cent said they weren’t familiar with Horgan.

That said, both Clark and Horgan registered similar levels of support when respondents were asked who they felt would do the better job as premier. Horgan came first, with 35 per cent agreeing he’d be a better premier, while 33 per cent maintained Clark was the one for the job. Only 13 per cent said Andrew Weaver of the B.C. Greens was the best candidate for the role.

The survey was conducted on the weekend of April 29-May 1, and asked 1,650 respondents to chime in. All respondents were screened to confirm voting eligibility, and responses were weighed based on 2011 census data. The survey’s margin of error is plus or minus 2.41 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Mainstreet has also dropped the B.C. Conservatives from the survey, as there are only a small number of candidates registered and to keep in line with Mainstreet’s polling standards.

http://vancouversun.com/news/l.....ction-poll
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed May 03, 2017 8:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the liberals have to hope the polls are wrong if they are to pull this one off and avoid an ndp win . another big question is if the green vote will actually hold and show up at the polls , currently polling , 19 - 24 % which is an unheard of amount of votes for a provincial green party )



NDP Leads Going Into the Final Week, but the Gap is Narrowing

May 2, 2017 @ 9:00 AM | Filed under: Uncategorized


CC image courtesy of Province of BC: http://bit.ly/2qlVjpr


Leads Going Into the Final Week, but the Gap is Narrowing

Weaver most popular leader by far

Toronto, May 1st – In a random sampling of public opinion taken by The Forum Poll™ among 1067 British Columbia voters, amongst those and decided and leaning, the NDP (37%) has an eight point lead over the governing Liberals (29%). The Green Party has the support of a quarter (24%) of respondents, with (7%) saying they are supporting the Conservatives, and (3%) saying they support another party.

If the election were held today, the NDP would secure 47 seats, the Liberals 34 seats, the Green Party 4, with 2 going to other parties.

Respondents most likely to support the NDP include those 34 or younger (40%), 45-54 (38%), or 55-64 (38%), females (40%), earning $40,000-$60,000 (44%), $60,000-$80,000 (44%), or $80,000-$100,000, (43%) with a post-graduate degree (43%), and living on Vancouver Island (39%) or Vancouver/Lower Mainland (36%).

Respondents most likely to support the Liberals include those aged 65 and over (41%), males (32%), and the most wealthy (35%).

Respondents most likely to say they support the Green Party include those 34 and younger (30%) or 35-44 (31%), the least wealthy (30%) or earning $20,000-$40,000 (28%), and living on Vancouver Island (28%) and Interior North (25%).



Weaver most popular leader, Clark ticks up, Horgan ticks down

Just over a quarter (28%) approve of the job Christy Clark is doing as premier, 6-in-10 (62%), and (11%) don’t know. Premier Clark’s net favourable score (approve – disapprove) is -34, slightly better than the beginning of April (April 5: -36)

Just under a third (31%) approve of John Horgan’s job as the leader of the opposition, a similar proportion (34%) disapprove, and (35%) don’t know. Horgan’s net favourable score is -3, down five points since early April (April 5: +2).

4-in-10 (42%) approve of Andrew Weaver’s job as the leader of the Green Party. (17%) disapprove, and (40%) don’t know. Weaver’s net favourable score is +25, an increase of 11 points since early April (April 5th: +14).

Best Premier tied between Horgan and Clark

A quarter (25%) of respondents say, regardless of their party affiliation, that John Horgan would make the best Premier of BC, which is a statistical tie with Christy Clark (24%). Andrew Weaver (21%) is third, just behind the pair. (16%) say they don’t know, with (15%) saying none of the above would make the best premier.


"We’re beginning to see a considerable increase in support for the Green Party, and the favourability of their popular leader Andrew Weaver is well ahead of either of his main opponents. What remains to be seen, however, is how this surge in Green Party support will affect the final count on election day," said Dr. Lorne Bozinoff, President of Forum Research.



Lorne Bozinoff, Ph.D. is the president and founder of Forum Research. He can be reached at lbozinoff@forumresearch.com or at (416) 960-9603.

http://poll.forumresearch.com/.....inal-week/
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PostPosted: Wed May 03, 2017 8:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mainstreet has it at 42%, 37%, 21%, with the Liberals up a few points.
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed May 03, 2017 9:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Progressive Tory wrote:
Mainstreet has it at 42%, 37%, 21%, with the Liberals up a few points.



I saw the mainstreet poll as well , both have the greens polling very high and that makes the final outcome somewhat unpredictable . as the greens tend to take votes from all parties but also have a hard time getting there voters out to the polls . so on election day it could be like 10% or 15% or even 20% for the greens , its really tough to say


mainstreet also has the ndp polling 47% in the critical greater Vancouver area , where most of the seats are . if that 10% lead holds for election day it be very difficult to envision a scenario where the bc liberals win another majority . the only region mainstreet has them leading is the interior and northern bc , where they already hold a lot of seats .
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed May 03, 2017 12:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Progressive Tory wrote:
cosmostein wrote:
This election should prove interesting.

If the Green Support is real;
It could allow for Liberals to come down the middle in ridings that have historically been NDP;

Even if the NDP has a strong popular vote.


I don't live in BC so I obviously don't see all the issues but the governments of Gordon Campbell and Christy Clark has been pretty solid. Clark appeared to struggle at first but she has come around and has done a good job, some of that might be due to her 2013 victory.


I spent 10 weeks out there, in Victoria mostly, and everybody seemed satisfied with a prospering status quo. There are some interesting public transportation systems being built in the province, bridges and highways as well. The roads in Victoria are at their absolute max and drivers see to know how to use the system of multi-phase traffic lights. But it is at the limit of being overloaded, and parts of it already 'jam up' at rush hour. Even so, they were already blasting a wider highway. My impression was that it all works. And amazed at the amount of regulation you live with.

I was surprised at the complexity of the garbage system, for example. They do way more sorting that we do in Ontario. The compost is one stream, and there are three others, some with separate collection days. But it goes beyond that. As an example, my brother is renovating a country place into a dream home, and has some old dry wall to get rid of. In Ontario, he would have to take it to the more serious dump around and pay a considerable fee. My brother has to have the dry wall tested to see if it's got asbestos in it or not. And then pay disposal charges accordingly. Another fee, but he seems happy enough to do it.

But you have to say, it all works, at least as far as I could see. People largely play the game, and park legally, etc. They all feel very smug about being British Columbians, that reflects itself in a care for the natural attractions of the Island. But it also manifests in an attitude, that they are the smart Canadians, not like those people in Alberta ... you know what I mean.

When I inquired about politics, I was mostly met with blank looks, or undisguised indifference. People didn't seem to find it interesting. Even with the buildup to the election campaign, it wasn't cool to get into local politics. I couldn't find many people that could tell me what the election was about. But there weren't any signs of grievances, I am sure I would have picked up on that. Even the pipeline through Burnaby has disappeared as an issue. And Christie is very effective on television, from what little I saw.

I suspect that the reason that the green vote is growing is because government seems to work pretty well in BC. If you're against governments in principle, the greens will' always give you cause. If there are more serious problems, you might vote for the official opposition.
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed May 03, 2017 6:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

David Suzuki endorses Andrew Weaver, BC Green Party in May 9 election

andrew weaver david suzuki

Well-known environmentalist and Canadian broadcaster David Suzuki pledged his support to the Greens and party leader Andrew Weaver at an event at the University of Victoria. Wed., May 3, 2017. (CTV Vancouver Island)

CTV Vancouver Island
Published Wednesday, May 3, 2017 3:56PM PDT
Last Updated Wednesday, May 3, 2017 4:19PM PDT


One of the country’s most well-known environmental advocates has thrown his support behind the BC Green Party in the upcoming provincial election.

David Suzuki pledged his support to the Greens and party leader Andrew Weaver at an event Wednesday at the University of Victoria.

“For over 30 years, scientists have been warning us that climate change caused by global warming represents a threat second only to nuclear war,” said Suzuki. “There is no better person in this country to guide us into the challenge of climate change, and the Green Party is the only party that has understood and embraced that challenge, and based its entire program on this.”


Suzuki said he’s never endorsed a political party and never expected to, but decided to endorse the Greens because of what he called “a great need for real change in B.C.”

Weaver said he was “grateful” for Suzuki’s confidence and touted the party’s vision for evidence-based solutions to the challenge of global warming.

Elsewhere in the province, BC Liberal Leader Christy Clark wrapped up a whirlwind tour in the Okanagan Wednesday morning.

She toured a local winery and touted her party’s push to sell B.C. wine in grocery stores, something that’s been challenged by several countries including the U.S., New Zealand and the European Union over protectionist claims.

Clark said if she’s reelected, the Liberals will continue to market BC Liquor internationally.

NDP Leader John Horgan spent the morning in North Vancouver talking to small businesses about tax concerns and the rising cost of living in parts of the province.

Both Horgan and Clark were set to return to the Lower Mainland Wednesday night at campaign events in Surrey and Vancouver, respectively.

http://vancouverisland.ctvnews.....-1.3397052
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed May 03, 2017 6:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the ndp seems to be on the offensive , leader visited a riding they don't normally win in North Vancouver )


B.C. Election 2017: Horgan looks for voter gains on the North Shore


Published on: May 3, 2017 | Last Updated: May 3, 2017 4:01 PM PDT


B.C. NDP party Leader John Horgan visits the election office of North Vancouver-Lonsdale NDP candidate Bowinn Ma Wednesday, May 3, 2017.



Metro Vancouver’s North Shore has never been particularly strong territory for B.C.’s New Democrats, but Leader John Horgan steered his provincial campaign there Wednesday in hopes of picking up one riding that appears key to his success in winning government on May 9.

Horgan pressed the flesh with local voters inside a restaurant in North Vancouver-Lonsdale, before visiting volunteers at the campaign office of NDP candidate Bowinn Ma


I’m very excited about the North Shore,” he told reporters after mingling with diners at the Cazba Restaurant.

Officially, Horgan sidestepped questions about whether North Vancouver-Lonsdale, home to B.C. Liberal cabinet minister Naomi Yamamoto, is a must-win for the NDP to secure a majority government on May 9.

But strategically, it’s on a short list of a dozen ridings in Metro Vancouver the NDP desperately need to take to solidify the party’s potential path to victory on election night. Horgan has campaigned there three times since April 11. The NDP needs to win big in Metro Vancouver, to hold off a B.C. Green push on Vancouver Island and counter the Liberal’s strength in the interior and north.


North Vancouver-Lonsdale also happens to be the most winnable of the North Shore’s four ridings — three of which are strongly-held bastions of support for the Liberals. In 2013, Yamamoto picked up 11,060 votes, or 45 per cent of the vote, compared to the NDP’s 9,872 votes, or 40.6 per cent of the vote. Since then, the riding boundaries have shrunk, potentially altering that margin even more.

Related
For full election coverage, go to vancouversun.com/bcelection.

“The three major issues out here that I constantly hear out on the doorstep, are affordability — but they are talking about cost of living in general — then there’s traffic and congestion, and then there’s child care,” said Ma, a 31-year-old engineer and capital project manager whose first foray into politics is under the NDP banner.

Ma said the NDP’s promise for $10-a-day child care, combined with its improvements for renters in the form of grants and loophole closures, are resonating among the riding’s diverse mixture of ages and incomes. “People are very excited about that,” she said. The affordability of housing and living costs are separating families by generation, who can no longer afford to live in the riding, said Ma.

North Vancouver-Lonsdale has a high proportion of renters, one of the highest rates of families led by single parents in the province, a growing residential development sector and a mixture of commercial, industrial and retail businesses. It’s rental population means a steady change in voters, and an average household income below the provincial average.


NDP Leader John Horgan, centre, chats with supporter Bruce Stout, left, as local candidate Bowinn Ma, right, listens during a campaign stop at a Persian restaurant in North Vancouver, B.C., on Wednesday May 3, 2017. A provincial election will be held on May 9. DARRYL DYCK / THE CANADIAN PRESS

“It’s always a fight in this riding,” said Yamamoto, who is seeking a third term as the Liberal MLA. “I think one of the reasons is almost half our population changes in four years.”

Yamamoto, a former local business owner, hopes her deep roots in the community as past chair of the chamber of commerce, credit union chair and Capilano University chair will help rally her vote in the ever-changing riding. And she said she’s hearing on doorsteps that the NDP promises are falling flat because people don’t trust how they’ll be paid for.

“I’m hearing that people aren’t buying what John Horgan is selling,” she said.

Yamamoto admitted she feels pressured by the NDP’s emphasis on the seat, but recalled in 2013 she was projected by pollsters to lose and nonetheless pulled out a win.

“This time sure the polls also show we’re going to lose this riding,” she said.

“I can tell you all that does is energize our workers and volunteers. It gives me a few sleepless nights. More than a few.”

http://vancouversun.com/news/p.....orth-shore
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PostPosted: Wed May 03, 2017 9:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have a good feeling Clark will pull it off.
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu May 04, 2017 7:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Polls give conflicting results on which party is ahead in B.C. election


Sunny Dhillon


VANCOUVER — The Globe and Mail


Published Wednesday, May 03, 2017 8:16PM EDT




With the provincial election less than a week away, pollsters examining the British Columbia campaign are offering voters an inconsistent view of where the parties stand, in contrast with 2013 when firms widely – and wrongly – predicted an NDP victory.

This time, the results differ significantly between polling firms, with one saying the BC Liberals have the momentum, another arguing the BC NDP is comfortably ahead, and others striking a more cautious tone.

The NDP was heavily favoured to win the provincial election four years ago, when the party was led by Adrian Dix. Instead, Liberal Leader Christy Clark carried her party to its fourth consecutive majority government.

Kyle Braid, a senior vice-president at Ipsos, said his company’s polling indicates the two parties are currently in a statistical tie.

“It’s anyone’s to win,” he said.

“And if it’s like the last election, where more than four in 10 registered voters don’t vote, it’s really going to be about which party does a better job of getting out their vote.”

Mr. Braid said he does not have a prediction on how the race will play out and he “learned last election [to] try to avoid too many predictions.”

A poll conducted by Ipsos the day before the 2013 vote had the NDP eight points ahead of the Liberals among decided voters. The Liberals ended up with 44 per cent of the vote – four-plus points ahead of the NDP – and 49 of 85 seats.

Mr. Braid said Ipsos conducted online polls four years ago, but this time around has added identical phone surveys.

“The main thing we’re doing differently is the dual methodology,” he said. “…We did online last time, others did phones, almost all of them were off. So there was something unique about the last election.”

Mario Canseco, who four years ago was with Angus Reid Public Opinion, has said the 2013 polling did not capture a late shift among voters.

Mr. Canseco, now vice-president of public affairs with Insights West, said in an interview that his current firm looked at the horse race at the start of the campaign and will do so again at its close.

“It’s better to focus on some of the issues in the middle of the campaign instead of just crunching out horse-race numbers every week,” he said.

This week, Insights West released a survey that examined the issues of accountability, energy, and the environment, as well as sentiments toward party leaders. The survey, among other things, found 77 per cent of British Columbians want to ban donations from corporations to political parties, and 73 per cent would like to ban such donations from unions.

Mr. Canseco said Insights West will continue polling into Monday, the day before the vote, to ensure it has the most recent information.

He said the criticism of pollsters after the past B.C. election was warranted – though that campaign has drawn much more attention than instances in which his polling was correct.

“That’s just the way things are. Nobody’s asked me about the 22 elections I’ve done correctly since I got here. It’s almost like being a goalie in hockey, nobody remembers the 22 stops, they remember the one that went by you,” he said.

David Valentin, executive vice-president with Mainstreet Research, said the race does appear to be close. While the NDP could win the popular vote, he said it’s difficult at the moment to see its path to a majority government.

Mr. Valentin said Mainstreet Research’s poll after the latest debate found movement toward the Liberals.

“In our post-debate poll, we asked what the debate-watchers planned to do, that’s usually a good indicator of what is to come,” he said.

“And what we saw there is that even though these debate-watchers said [BC NDP Leader] John Horgan won the debate, and even though they told us that they found [BC Green Party Leader] Andrew Weaver the most favourable, they still told us by a slim margin that they intended to vote Liberal.”

Forum Research this week released a poll that said the NDP has an eight-point lead over the Liberals, 37 per cent to 29 per cent.

Lorne Bozinoff, the firm’s president, said that while the NDP is comfortably ahead, he is keeping an eye on the third-place Greens, whom the poll placed at 24 per cent.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com.....e34892391/
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PostPosted: Thu May 04, 2017 7:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Advance voter turnout much higher than last election, says Elections BC


Vancouver, BC, Canada / News Talk 980 CKNW | Vancouver's News. Vancouver's Talk

Emily Lazatin


Posted: May 02, 2017 06:35 pm

| Last Updated: May 03, 2017 07:15 am


Advance voter turnout much higher than last election, says Elections BC

It seems more people are turning out this election to cast their vote early.

The first two days of advance voting on April 29 and 30 saw a total of 230,000 voters cast ballots.

Elections BC Communications Manager Andrew Watson says that’s a major increase from the 2013 Election.

“Voters are voting at advance voting more often than they have in the past. In 2013, the total number of advance votes cast was around 20 per cent of the total votes cast. That’s up from five or six per cent from the mid-90s.”

READ MORE: B.C. election advance polls open: Where and when you can vote

He says each day over 100,000 people cast their votes, handily exceeding previous statistics.

“First day of advance voting in 2013 saw about 106,000 turn out, for 2013 the second day was about 81,000. But when comparing the two elections, it’s important to keep in mind there are two extra days for advance voting.”

And those numbers are expected to increase even further, as the last round of advance voting takes place Wednesday to Saturday this week

http://www.cknw.com/2017/05/02.....ctions-bc/
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