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RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Nov 08, 2016 11:17 am    Post subject: Ontario to bring back photo radar Reply with quote

( this had been mentioned before that school zones might be included if photo radar was ever brought back , they also decided to include so called " community safety zones " which if you ever drive thru smaller towns or cities are basically every semi busy main street and roads thru most towns . meaning that photo radar could be coming not only to school zones but many other busy roads around Ontario , which will be another massive cash grab by wynne and company )


Ontario to bring back photo radar for school zones

Speed limit


The Associated Press
Published Tuesday, November 8, 2016 9:54AM EST



OTTAWA - Ontario municipalities could soon introduce photo radar in school zones under new legislation.

Premier Kathleen Wynne says the bill would allow municipalities to introduce it on municipal roads, in school zones and community safety zones.

The photo radar, also known as automated speed enforcement technology, would take pictures of the licence plates of drivers who are speeding.

The bill would also allow municipalities to create reduced-speed-limit zones and let them participate more easily in the red light camera program.

Wynne says too many people are being injured and killed by drivers who speed.

Photo radar became a political football in Ontario in the 1990s after it was introduced by the NDP government, but it was killed by premier Mike Harris after the Progressive Conservatives won the 1995 election, in part on a pledge to get rid of the cameras.

http://www.cp24.com/news/ontar.....-1.3150721
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Nov 08, 2016 11:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( they will claim this is for safety but its nothing more than another massive cash grab , I imagine municipalities all over the place will get on board as this is an easy source of extra revenue )


Ontario to reintroduce photo radar in school zones


Premier Kathleen Wynne unveils plan for cameras that would take photos of speeders’ licence plates and mail them tickets.



Former Progressive Conservative premier Mike Harris who scrapped photo radar in 1995 less than a year after NDP premier Bob Rae introduced it to Ontario highways. (Keith Beaty / Toronto Star) | Order this photo



By Robert BenzieQueen's Park Bureau Chief

Tues., Nov. 8, 2016



It’s photo radar redux.

After a formal request from Toronto Mayor John Tory, Premier Kathleen Wynne has announced new legislation empowering municipalities to install safety cameras near schools to curb speeding and protect pedestrians and cyclists.

“We have seen too many injuries and deaths caused by drivers who speed and endanger people’s lives,” Wynne said Tuesday in Ottawa, where she was campaigning for the Nov. 17 Ottawa-Vanier byelection.

“Our intent is to give municipalities more tools to help keep people safe on our roads,” the premier said, emphasizing the cameras would not be placed on provincial highways as they briefly were — amid political controversy — in 1994-95.

“We are doing this … because we know it will make it safer for kids … and because municipalities have asked us to work with them.”


Ottawa Mayor Jim Watson said “this is great news” because it will make streets safer and free up police officers from manning radar guns to do more pressing work.

Watson said “speeders will be penalized with a heavy fine and potentially some demerit points.”

All revenue from the tickets will go to municipalities.


Under the legislation, municipalities would have more power to improve safety in school zones and so-called community safety zones.

These include:

•Cameras that would take photos of speeders’ licence plates and mail them tickets.


•Reduced speed-limit zones to decrease collisions between vehicles and pedestrians.


•Making it easier for towns and cities to join Ontario’s red-light camera program.


In February, Tory said he wanted to increase safety and reduce policing costs by asking Wynne to amend provincial laws to allow photo radar in Toronto.

“Give us legislative freedom to do a couple of things that I think are going to be very fundamental to the modernization of policing and to the addressing of the police budgetary concerns,” the mayor said at the time.

His request was significant because it was former Progressive Conservative premier Mike Harris who scrapped photo radar in 1995 less than a year after NDP premier Bob Rae introduced it to Ontario highways.

Tory, a former Conservative leader, said things have changed in a generation since the era when photo radar was derided as a cash grab.

“We can use technology in place of uniform police officers. This will allow for more efficient deployment of expensive, highly trained police officers,” he said in February.

Both PC Leader Patrick Brown and NDP Leader Andrea Horwath have said they would welcome safety cameras, suggesting photo radar is no longer the political hot button it was two decades ago.

“It’s important to hear from the police, to hear from municipalities. If that’s something they want to pursue then it should be considered here,” Brown said in February.

“It was the Progressive Conservatives that got rid of photo radar, so there is some hesitation toward that, but . . . the reality is municipalities are desperately looking at new revenue mechanisms because of underfunding,” he said.

Horwath said “it’s actually time to have a new look” at the measure given the attitudinal and technological changes.

“We simply cannot have a police officer on every single street where there’s a potential speeder.”

A study released earlier this year by York University and the Hospital for Sick Children found that the most dangerous part of a child’s day was likely during the morning drop-off, with congested streets and crazy driving.

Researchers looked at collisions and injury rates, as well as parents’ habits behind the wheel, and observed at least two instances of dangerous driving during the morning rush hour at almost 90 per cent of schools they monitored.

The study also reported that over a 12-year period, 411 children in the areas studied were hit by a car within 200 metres of the school and, of those, 45 were during peak times.

https://www.thestar.com/news/queenspark/2016/11/08/photo-radars-are-coming-back-near-ontario-schools-wynne-says.html
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Nov 08, 2016 11:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( as recently as 2015 the liberals said photo radar was not coming back , I guess they changed there minds )


Photo radar not coming back: Transportation minister

By Antonella Artuso, Queen's Park Bureau Chief
First posted: Monday, March 09, 2015 02:22 PM EDT | Updated: Monday, March 09, 2015 03:34 PM EDT



Ontario Transportation Minister Steven Del Duca
Ontario Transportation Minister Steven Del Duca on Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. (Antonella Artuso/Toronto Sun)


TORONTO - Photo radar's a no go.

Transportation Minister Steven Del Duca was nixing the idea Monday even before receiving an official request from York Region that it be allowed to use the technology to curb speeders.

The minister said he's prepared to review York Region's proposal when it formally arrives.

"But at this point in time, the province doesn't have an interest in returning to photo radar," he said.

Progressive Conservative MPP Michael Harris said there are other options besides photo radar for controlling speeders, including additional driver's licence demerit points and heavier police enforcement.

The province under former NDP premier Bob Rae brought in photo radar in the early 1990s, but the plug was pulled on the controversial speed trap by the successor PC government.

"Photo radar was here and it was just simply a cash grab," Harris said.

NDP Leader Andrea Horwath said she wouldn't even begin to discuss the possibility of the return of photo radar until she knew York Region had fully examined all other ways to slow down speeders .

"They range from things like traffic-calming humps, or speed bumps some people call them, washboards (that) vibrate when you drive too fast," she said. "Having been a municipal councillor, I've seen dozens of different initiatives that a municipality can undertake to try to get traffic to calm down.

http://www.torontosun.com/2015.....n-minister
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Nov 08, 2016 11:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Photo radar just a cash grab


Simon Kent
By Simon Kent, Special to the Toronto Sun
First posted: Wednesday, January 09, 2013 10:23 AM EST | Updated: Wednesday, January 09, 2013 06:09 PM EST




The time has come to apply the duck test to Toronto Police Chief Bill Blair.

He wants to consider reintroducing photo radar and expand red light cameras in an effort to catch more speeders.

Not to raise revenue. Not to directly save lives. Not to make the day-to-day operations of his service more streamlined.

Blair just wants to save money, according to his spokesman Mark Pugash. How very noble.

Anyways, he says there would be large warning signs to make motorists aware they are being watched and targeted for infractions.

Do you already feel safer reading that?

Well, if something looks like a duck, swims like a duck and quacks like a duck, then it probably is a duck.

Or in this case a straight-out attempt to relieve drivers of their hard-earned cash by a cynical revenue-raising scheme dressed not so much as a feathered pond dweller as a cost saving efficiency.

“His position is that police officers are a very expensive resource to use for something which technology can do ... and much more economically,” Pugash said by way of explanation, presumably without blushing.

It was a position the chief reinforced when talking to the press Wednesday.

Of course, we have been down this road before (if you’ll pardon the obvious pun).

Cameras were introduced to catch speeding motorists by the NDP in 1994 and created a furore in the process.

Former Tory premier Mike Harris quietly laid the idea to rest just 11 months later. A subsequent attempt was made via a private member’s bill to allow municipalities to install the cameras near schools and construction sites.

It was also defeated.

That’s where the matter lay until the thought bubble by Blair brought the issue to the surface once again.

Let’s not be in any doubt about this.

Motorists are sick of being taken for moving sources of provincial and city revenue.

Here’s an example. How many times have you driven down an otherwise empty side street only to be confronted by a police radar?

Invariably there will be two fully crewed cruisers and another operator for the radar. This, in an area that might otherwise be uncontaminated by any competing “criminal” activity besides a humble motorist who might, just might, be exceeding the speed limit by 5 kilometres per hour — if that.

Toronto would be a truly blessed city if that was the sole unlawful act to occupy the talents of this city’s finest on a normal shift.

If we are to truly take Chief Blair at his word, and we have no reason other than natural cynicism to think otherwise, why don’t we drop the notion of speed radar completely?

A 1993 study in Riverside, Calif., examined “the effect of photo-radar and speed display boards on traffic speed ... on comparable streets.”

Its findings were salutary. Put simply, unmanned speed boards were more effective in deterring speeders than radar.

The study’s “primary conclusion” was: “While both photo-radar and speed display boards can be effective in reducing vehicle speeds, display boards offer better overall results.”

So what better way to slow drivers down than to have cheap, efficient electronic display boards wherever speeders are thought to congregate. No fines needed. No surprise pictures in the mail. Case closed, Your Honour.

Ontario road users are already taxed and charged and fined and monitored and then fined again for infractions — often more imagined than real on a daily basis.

Perhaps Mr. Blair should get his own house in order and look for other ways to stretch his police budget rather than look to fine drivers off the very roads their taxes helped build in the first place.

We know that the Toronto Police budget continues to climb as crime rates drop.

Is it time to ask the question: Do we need so many police and are the ones we have so necessary that they cannot be relieved of such revenue raising exercises as photo radar?

After all the role of the police is to go after real criminals, not to act as a quasi taxation agency.

http://www.torontosun.com/2013.....generators
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Nov 08, 2016 11:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( she also wants to give municipalities the power to lower speed limits to 40 km an hour on residential streets making it much easier for them to hand out tickets as 40 km is a very slow speed and most cars would be going 50 km or more typically , I'm all for more safety on our roads but see this as a cash grab by cash hungry towns and cities )



Kathleen Wynne announces new photo radar legislation for Ontario

Municipalities would be able to create zones with reduced speed limits

CBC News Posted: Nov 08, 2016 9:14 AM ET| Last Updated: Nov 08, 2016 11:03 AM ET

This sign indicates photo radar is present in Saskatoon.
This sign indicates photo radar is present in Saskatoon. (Adrian Cheung/CBC)




Municipalities in Ontario could soon deploy photo radar in school zones if new legislation announced by Premier Kathleen Wynne in Ottawa today is adopted.

■Jim Watson now open to photo radar, but only in school zones
■Photo radar in Ottawa: Pros and cons debated on social media

The proposed law would allow municipalities to use automated speed technology to take photos of speeders' licence plates in school zones, and in areas around places like daycares, parks, seniors' homes and hospitals.

"Kids will be safer because of these decisions," Wynne told a crowd at Elmdale Public School Tuesday morning.

Photo radar has been a controversial issue in Ottawa. Mayor Jim Watson initially opposed photo radar arguing it was a "cash grab" for the city, but later changed his stance if the technology was only used in school zones and only if the ward councillor wants it.

Kathleen Wynne
Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne and Ottawa Centre MPP Yasir Naqvi talk to school children ahead of Tuesday's announcement. (Giacomo Panico/CBC)

"This gives us a tool to deal with a serious problem," he said Tuesday.

The announcement got a round of applause from Ottawa Police Chief Charles Bordeleau.

He said the technology will deter speeders and allow him to deploy his officers to more pressing crime scenes.

"This is about saving lives ... this is about changing driver behaviour," the chief said.

Wynne said any revenue generated from photo radar would stay with the municipalities. Previously, Watson told reporters any money generated by a photo radar pilot project would go into road safety programs and not into general city coffers.

New speed zones

If passed, the law would also allow municipalities to lower default speed limits from 50 km/h to 40 or 30. The law would give municipalities the power and choice to lower limits in individual neighbourhoods, or wider areas.

​Watson said he'd like to see the speed limit come down to 40 km/h on Ottawa's residential streets, but will undertake consultations to see what each ward wants.

The proposed legislation would also streamline the province's red-light camera program so cities and towns could bypass the lengthy regulatory approval process.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/.....-1.3841356
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Tue Nov 08, 2016 11:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The gift that keeps on giving;
This was the first Bob Rae concept that was scrapped when Mike Harris was elected.

Lets hope history repeats
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Nov 08, 2016 2:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
The gift that keeps on giving;
This was the first Bob Rae concept that was scrapped when Mike Harris was elected.

Lets hope history repeats



the liberals had said very clearly in 2015 they weren't interested in this idea , one has to wonder what's changed . perhaps there is a lot of cash starved towns and cities out there and this is a way for wynne to win favours with them . I know my town of 18,000 is in a desperate financial mess currently for some unknown reason and desperate for new revenue , this could be a way to bring some new revenue in .


its also possible its part of a more " activist " driven agenda from wynne , perhaps admitting she is going to lose in 2018 or get forced out before that but at least she'll get a chance to advance her liberal agenda in the time before next election


the fact its also being announced on the same day as American election , that seems fishy to me as 90% of the media coverage on tonights news is going to be about trump/Clinton , this photo radar plan isn't even going to make the news I would suspect or appear very late , they must know its not popular with many people
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Nov 10, 2016 12:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://nophotoradar.ca/


someone has started a site against photo radar in ontario , although it doesn't seem to have been updated in a while , seems from flipping thru it that a lot of other Canadian sites already have photo radar and making big money from it
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Nov 10, 2016 12:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( can you honestly picture drivers in Toronto doing 40 km an hour on some of the roads listed in this article , wynne and tory are already counting all the money there going to be making from these camera's , there going to be ticketing everyone , insurance companies are also going to use these tickets as a reason for raising rates on thousands of drivers across Ontario who are ticketed and have no way to fight the tickets and will lose demerit points on license )



Province giving Toronto new powers to lower speed limits

Speed limits


Chris Fox, CP24.com
Published Thursday, November 10, 2016 11:19AM EST



Lower speed limits could soon be in place along dozens of Toronto streets thanks to new provincial legislation.

The legislation gives the City of Toronto the ability to “create zones with reduced speed limits.”

As well, the legislation allows municipalities to introduce photo radar in school zones and streamlines the process for municipalities that wish to install red light cameras at intersections.

Announcing the legislation at Northlea Public School on Thursday, which is near the Leaside intersection where six-year-old Georgia Walsh was struck and killed by a vehicle two years ago, Premier Kathleen Wynne said that the hope is that the initiatives will convince drivers to slow down.

“I know that this community in particular has dealt with the tragedy of a young girl being killed on the streets. It is our responsibility to find ways to make sure that never happens again,” Wynne said.

Toronto intends to lower speed limits at 54 different locations

This past summer, Toronto city council voted unanimously in favour of an $80-million, five-year road safety plan.

The plan, among other initiatives, proposed lowering speed limits along 54 corridors, many of which are in the downtown core. .

On Thursday, Mayor John Tory said that the new provincial legislation will give the city “the latitude” to do precisely that.

Last September, the city also voted to lower speed limits to 30 km/h on residential roads within the Toronto and East York community council districts.

“This gives us greater ability to set speed limits that we think are suitable for different parts of the city,” Tory said.

Some of the major arterial roads that could get lower speed limits under the city’s plan include:
• Spadina Avenue between Queen’s Quay and College Street (50 km/h to 40 km/h),
• Queen Street from Yonge Street to Parliament Street (50 km/h to 40 km/h),
• University Avenue from Front Street to Gerrard Street (50 km/h to 40 km/h)
• Dundas Street from Humberside Avenue to Broadview Avenue (50 km/h to 40 km/h).

http://www.cp24.com/news/provi.....-1.3154550
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Nov 10, 2016 12:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the liberal mayors of Brampton and Mississauga are welcoming photo radar with open arms , no surprise they are being handed thousands of dollars in extra revenue they weren't expecting from these camera's )


23 hours ago | Vote 0 0

Brampton and Mississauga welcome proposed photo radar legislation

Program shelved in 1995


File photo by Carlos Osorio/Torstar Network

Mayors in Brampton and Mississauga welcomed proposed Ontario government legislation that could bring photo radar to school and community safety zones.



Brampton Guardian
By Roger Belgrave


Mayors in Brampton and Mississauga welcomed proposed Ontario government legislation that could bring photo radar to local roadways.

On Tuesday, Nov. 8, Premier Kathleen Wynne revealed her government’s plan to introduce legislation that would allow Ontario municipalities to use the cameras in school and community safety zones.

Measures under the legislation include the use of automated speed enforcement (ASE) technology, which could take photographs of a speeder’s licence plates.

Municipalities could also lower speed limits and expand the use of Red Light Cameras.

“I welcome news that the Wynne government will empower municipalities to install safety cameras near schools to reduce dangerous speeding and protect families,” Mississauga Mayor Bonnie Crombie said in a news release.

Brampton Mayor Linda Jeffrey was also thankful for additional tools to keep roads safer for pedestrians and cyclists of all ages.

“Far too many cyclist and pedestrian injuries have been attributed to car speed and driver distraction and as such city council will consult with our local school boards, cycling committees and seniors groups for their opinions and advice,” said Jeffrey in an email to media.

The former New Democrat government introduced photo radar as a pilot project in 1994, but the program was criticized as cash grab and shelved when the Conservatives took office in 1995.

Crombie, who promised to hold council discussions with the community, insisted safety and not tax revenues must be the main objective.

Revenues must be invested in community safety, Crombie said.

She also pointed out the technology could “free up” police officers to handle other work, instead of manning radar guns.

“Our intent is to give municipalities more tools to help keep people safe on our roads,” said Wynne.

http://www.bramptonguardian.co.....gislation/
RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Nov 12, 2016 9:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( wynne's nanny state agenda is in full swing , this is just another example )


Fines for photo radar zones


School and community safety zones could also see reduced speed limits.


Toronto Mayor John Tory chats with local children during a street safety announcement at Northlea public school in Leaside Thursday. (KRISTIN RUSHOWY / TORONTO STAR) | Order this photo



By Kristin RushowyQueen's Park Bureau

Thu., Nov. 10, 2016



Parents who pushed for better road safety near their schools and in their communities prompted new legislation that will allow municipalities to install photo radar and lower speed limits, Premier Kathleen Wynne said Thursday.

At a news conference at Northlea public school in Toronto’s Leaside neighbourhood — in her riding — Wynne said families there were among those across the province “saying ‘we need to see something happen. You know, the streets are filled with cars that are driving too fast and we’re worried about our kids.’

“And in some cases like this, in this part of the province, in this neighbourhood, there actually was a child who was killed. And so it made it a very, very important issue here,” she added, referring to Georgia Walsh who died after being hit by a minivan two years ago.

The new moves mean “people will know that if they are driving through a school zone they need to slow down. And that will be up to the city to decide where those will go,” she said.

“But it will only be in school zones and community safety zones, where quite frankly there are a lot of kids because that’s what this is about.”


Cities will also be able to lower speed limits in those zones from the typical 50 or 40 kilometres an hour, she added.

Drivers who are caught will face fines, but not demerit points, said Transportation Minister Steven Del Duca, adding that it will be up to communities to install cameras or reduce speed limits, or do both.

Wynne thanked Toronto Mayor John Tory and city councillor Jon Burnside for their work on road safety. Tory had asked the province back in February to allow photo radar in the city.

When asked about revenue from the fines, Tory said “I hope we don't take in one cent and I'm also quite prepared to say if we take in any money from fines that are issued as a result of the use of this technology in school zones that we will put all of it towards the $68 million we're spending at present on a road safety plan to make sure we cut pedestrian deaths down to zero.”

Conservative MPP Michael Harris said his party has “always supported initiatives that help make our schools and communities and high-risk zones safer. We look forward to reviewing the legislation carefully, to make sure it achieves its intended purpose and doesn’t become a cash grab like the former photo radar in the province.”

He also wondered if the radar and lower speed limits would be in effect after hours and on weekends.

Harris, who represents Kitchener-Conestoga, knows first-hand about road safety concerns — just the other day, his young son “was getting off the bus and seconds later a guy was speeding down our street.”

He noted, however, that he believes photo radar won’t stop drivers like that, “only police officers can deal with that.”

Meanwhile, Toronto District School Board Trustee Ken Lister is asking that the revenue raised be given to school boards to repair fields and playgrounds. His motion goes before a board committee next week and asks that a letter be sent to Wynne and Education Minister Mitzie Hunter.

https://www.thestar.com/news/queenspark/2016/11/10/fines-for-photo-radar-zones.html
queenmandy85





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PostPosted: Sun Nov 13, 2016 12:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What makes you think you have a God-given right to break the law. If you don't want to pay a fine, don't speed. If you disagree with the speed limit, change the law. One of the most dangerous factors on the road is impatience.
RCO





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PostPosted: Sun Nov 13, 2016 2:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

queenmandy85 wrote:
What makes you think you have a God-given right to break the law. If you don't want to pay a fine, don't speed. If you disagree with the speed limit, change the law. One of the most dangerous factors on the road is impatience.


I'm not against this law cause I think drivers should be speeding thru school zones , that is the spin liberals will try and use to justify this cash grab .

I'm against it for a long list of other reasons

1- police already can do enforcement in school zones and other trouble areas and hand out tickets to bad drivers , the claim the police are too busy or should be doing other things doesn't add up , where I live the OPP have many officers and not over worked and have the time to patrol school zones during the week , I have seen them doing this on many occasions

2 - is other ways to slow down drivers in school zones , signage and lighting can be increased on the signs , speed limits can be lowered , speed bumps can be build into the road etc

3 - insurance rates - the liberals here claimed they were going to be going down a couple years ago , however these tickets will be used by insurance companies to raise drivers premiums , can you imagine how much your insurance will go up if you get a couple of these tickets ? the increase could be huge

4- haven't explained what speeds will be worthy of a ticket , are they going to ticket every car going 10km over the speed limit even if they pose no threat to anyone ? or 20 km an hour ? it has yet to be explained in further details

5- will there be the same legal options to challenge these tickets as exist for current speeding tickets in Ontario ? how do you challenge a ticket when it was given to you by a machine and is no witnesses or actual police officer to write and hand you the ticket ? are you just suppose to pay the fine and lose the points and stay quiet ?

6- these tickets also won't remove a driver from the roads who is an immediate threat to public safety , giving someone a ticket a month later in the mail is not going to take someone off the road who poses an immediate threat like an impaired driver or someone with mental health issues etc
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon May 01, 2017 7:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Conservative MPP wants proposed bill allowing potential photo radar on highways altered

By Antonella Artuso, Toronto Sun
First posted: Sunday, April 30, 2017 04:48 PM EDT | Updated: Sunday, April 30, 2017 04:58 PM EDT


Ontario Progressive Conservative MPP Michael Harris is concerned the Safer School Zones Act, as currently worded, would allow the use of photo radar on pretty much any road in a municipality. (TORONTO SUN/FILES)




Ontario Progressive Conservatives will ask for changes to proposed photo radar legislation to ensure use of the technology doesn’t spread beyond school areas to major roads and highways, MPP Michael Harris says.



“The Ontario PC caucus is absolutely supportive of measures to keep our kids safe in school zones,” Harris said. “But what the government did here, in typical Liberal fashion, they disguised the potential for photo radar to be on major highways, expressways, and of course the slippery slope of it, eventually getting back to the 401.”

The Safer School Zones Act, a government bill authorizing the use of Automated Speed Enforcement (ASE) technology in “school zones” and “community safety zones,” is before a legislative committee this upcoming week.

Harris is concerned the bill, as currently worded, would allow the use of photo radar on pretty much any road in a municipality.

While a school zone is defined in law, municipalities have much more leeway in designating an area a community safety zone, Harris said.

One city councillor in Ontario has already suggesting using the bill to put photo radar on major expressways, he said.

There may be “hot spots” in a municipality that would benefit from photo radar, but the government should either define a community safety zone or drop it from the bill, He said.

“A councillor could basically designate photo radar anywhere on any road in their municipality,” he said.

Harris intends to introduce amendments to the bill Monday.

An Ontario Transportation Ministry statement said the legislation limits photo radar to only school and community safety zones which “are of particular concern to municipalities due to the concentrated presence of vulnerable road users.”

Don Peat, spokesman for Toronto Mayor John Tory, said in an email that the mayor wants to use photo radar only in school zones to protect children.

The PC MPP said he also plans to introduce an amendment to the bill to authorize the use in court of photos taken by school buses to prosecute a motorist who ignores a flashing sign to stop.

“A school bus is actually an extension of a school,” Harris said. “And we know that there is a major problem right now in the province of people blowing by the bus when it has its flashing lights on.”

http://www.torontosun.com/2017.....ys-altered
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Ontario to bring back photo radar

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