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Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Mar 22, 2017 1:37 pm    Post subject: Federal Budget .... Reply with quote

Quote:
Liberals to address women’s concerns in first gender-based federal budget
BILL CURRY AND ROBERT FIFE
OTTAWA — The Globe and Mail

The Trudeau government’s second budget will include a host of measures specifically aimed at improving the lives of women, including a plan to fund new child-care spaces, extend maternity and paternity benefits and address sexual assault.

The budget will also increase defence spending, The Globe and Mail has learned, but details won’t be released until Ottawa completes a formal defence policy review later this year. And The Globe has also been told there will be a “pretty substantial investment” in affordable housing and child care, providing the first clear breakdown of its “social infrastructure” plans.

The government is not saying how it will pay for any new spending or what specific tax measures would be included in the budget. But an official said the Prime Minister believes higher income Canadians should share the heavier load of taxes. [....]
http://www.theglobeandmail.com.....e34379766/


This should be a doozy! Canadian women are already dripping with special benefits. What more can they do? Symbolic stuff, like building more day care spaces? We shall soon see ...
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Mar 22, 2017 3:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Budget 2017: Cash crunch leaves Liberals with little new spending


Laura Payton, Ottawa News Bureau Online Producer

@laura_payton
.
Published Wednesday, March 22, 2017 4:29PM EDT


OTTAWA --The federal government is offering almost no new spending in the 2017 budget, a document that brings into focus already announced funding amid an economic crunch.
• WATCH LIVE: CTV News Chief Anchor Lisa LaFlamme leads live FEDERAL BUDGET 2017 Special on CTVNews.ca, CTV News GO, CTV and CTV News Channel
• Watch Power Play for further analysis @ 5 p.m. ET on CTV News Channel

Total new spending over the next year, in fact, clocks in at only $1.3 billion on a total budget of $304.7 billion, but all of it is money that was already budgeted in previous spending plans.


Bill Morneau and Justin Trudeau
Finance Minister Bill Morneau and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau hold copies of the federal budget in the House of Commons in Ottawa, Wednesday, March 22, 2017. (Adrian Wyld / THE CANADIAN PRESS)

The spending is projected to ramp up to $8.2 billion in 2021-2022.

Much of the spending reinforces the Liberals’ plan to emphasize policies that help the middle class and those aiming to join it, including health-care funding, more flexibility for parental leave and other family leave, and community infrastructure.

The careful shuffling of cash leaves the Liberals in a slightly better position, with the deficit actually dropping slightly from the projection six months ago in the fall economic update.

But Finance Minister Bill Morneau has re-added a $3 billion contingency to his calculations, increasing the new projected deficit to $28.5 billion. It’s expected to fall through 2021-22 to $18.8 billion, including the $3 billion contingency.

The government ended the 2016-17 fiscal year in better than expected shape, with a $21.8 billion deficit rather than the $25.1 billion projected last fall.

Federal debt as a per cent of GDP clocks in very slightly higher this year than last, at 31.6 per cent.

“We have shown in this budget a very responsible approach,” Morneau told reporters in the budget briefing. “The plan is to continue to be responsible every step along the way.”

“We see it as a very ambitious plan, a vision of Canada for the future.”

Money for transit, social housing

Much of the spending detailed in the budget, the Liberal government’s second, simply provides the details for broad categories of already-announced spending, including some of the government’s planned $20 billion in social infrastructure funds.

As expected, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government is committing money for skills, innovation and jobs, with $594 million set aside for this year, rising to $1.4 billion by 2021-22.

The most expensive items include infrastructure and social programs, including $20.1 billion promised over 11 years for public transit.

The government also plans to devote $6 billion over 10 years for home care and $5 billion over 10 years for mental health initiatives through individual deals with the provinces and territories.

On assistance for families, a big ticket item is affordable child care, with a $7 billion pledge over 10 years to create up to 40,000 more spaces.

The budget follows through on promise to let parents take their Employment Insurance parental leave benefits over 18 months rather than 12, giving them the choice of taking the existing 55 per cent benefit rate over a year or 33 per cent over a year and a half. They also propose letting women start their maternity leaves 12 weeks before their due dates rather than eight weeks prior.

The government also promises $691.3 million over five years for a new EI caregiving benefit, which would allow Canadians to take up to 15 weeks to care for an adult family member who needs significant support to recover from a critical illness or injury.

The Liberals plan to spend $11.2 billion over 11 years on social housing, including $5 billion for a National Housing Fund to address critical housing issues and targeted support for Indigenous Canadians living off-reserve. The money is also intended to help seniors, those with disabilities and mental illness, veterans and people fleeing domestic violence.

The housing funding also includes $3.2B for new construction, renovations and rent subsidies, and $2.1 billion to fight homelessness.

The country’s mayors had estimated they need more than $12 billion for repairs to existing units alone, in addition to funds for programming and the need to build additional units.

Money for skills training

The budget also includes more than $3.5 billion over five years for education and skills training, including expanded student loan and grant eligibility, in particular for part-time students and those with dependents, and for the youth employment strategy.

Some of the spending is directed to Indigenous Canadians, including $4 billion over 10 years for housing, water treatment, health facilities and other community infrastructure. That money is coming from the government’s previously promised green infrastructure and social infrastructure funds.

There’s also a $90 million increase over two years for post-secondary student support for Indigenous Canadians, which is expected to help 4,600 students; $50 million for skills training, coming out of new, existing and reallocated funds; $55.5 million over five years for restorative justice and $62.5 million over five years for rehabilitation and job assistance for Indigenous offenders.

Other measures included in the budget:
• $62.9 million over five years for immigration and refugee legal aid services
• $100.9 million over five years to fund a national strategy to fight gender-based violence
• $3.6 million over three years to create an LGBTQ2 secretariat at the Privy Council Office to advance human rights
• $55 million over five years to create new and fill 28 new federally appointed judge positions to speed up access to justice
• $27.5 million over five years for an employment strategy for newcomers
• $867.3 million over three years for Via Rail
• $25 million over five years for high-performance athletes

Morneau also promised to closing tax loopholes and devote $523.9 million over five years to prevent tax evasion and improve compliance. The budget forecasts the government will make an additional $2.5 billion over five years from those measures.

http://www.ctvnews.ca/politics.....d4fa9225ad
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Mar 22, 2017 3:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( more harper era tax credits are being cancelled , claim is they are ineffective but one has to wonder if real reason is cause it was conservatives who created them )



CBC Ottawa‏Verified account @CBCOttawa · 8m8 minutes ago

Budget eliminates public transit tax credit after June 30. No more claiming bus passes as tax credit. #ottnews #budget2017
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Mar 22, 2017 4:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the elimination of the public transit tax credit seems to have really angered the masses , as I was looking thru all the tweets and the people upset are not conservative voters at all , mostly urban and younger )


Benny Bing‏ @BennyBing · 1m1 minute ago

Eliminating public transit tax credit and tax hikes on booze is no good for Torontonians. Bad idea. #Budget2017



Teri Hart‏Verified account @TeriHart · 2m2 minutes ago

Eliminating public transit tax credit is a mistake. Those taking transit regularly should have a benefit #Budget2017


Chris Ariens‏ @Chris_Ariens · 3m3 minutes ago


Cost of @GOtransit up 15% thanks to elimination of public transit tax credit. Big hurt to many #BurlON residents @PamDamoff @karinagould


Canadaguy 🍁‏ @JamesTPorter · 3m3 minutes ago

@JustinTrudeau why'd you scrap the transit tax credit? that hurt lower income canadians & the environment. #Budget2017 #cdnpoli


Jenn Campbell‏ @babyface_jenn · 3m3 minutes ago

I usually don't say anything about politics but damnit the Libs just cut the Public Transit Tax credit which will screw me as a commuter


Richard White‏ @iricsi · 4m4 minutes ago

@BenSpurr It won't. I actually am planning on buying a car now. Service is bad, pass is overpriced without a tax credit. Not worth it.


cdnpoli‏ @cdnpoli3 · 4m4 minutes ago

@HuffPostCanada Do the math. No more transit tax credit means monthly passes don't makes sense for most commuters. Pay as you go.



Glen Korstrom‏ @GlenKorstrom · 5m5 minutes ago

Sounds a bit regressive for the Liberals to eliminate the tax credit for public #transit passes effective July 1
#Budget2017


Dustin Coffman‏ @DustinC0ffman · 6m6 minutes ago

Not impressed at all that the public transit tax credit is being eliminated. Only credit I truly benefited from #Budget2017 @R_Boissonnault


Tri Luu‏ @TLLuu · 7m7 minutes ago

@JustinTrudeau Why are you cancelling the public transit tax credit?


Jason Hampton‏ @jasonChampton · 9m9 minutes ago

Jason Hampton Retweeted CBC News Alerts

Damnit. Transit Tax Credit is one of my few deductions. #cdnpoli


Dan MacLeod‏ @dan_j_mac · 11m11 minutes ago

@TOAdamVaughan Public Transit Tax Credit gone? Any thoughts? This sucks.


Lloyd Torres‏ @ImperatorTorres · 12m12 minutes ago

Disappointed that transit tax credit will be cancelled. As a @UWaterloo co-op it helped me greatly for GTA work terms #budget2017 #cdnpoli


Sarah Weaver‏ @_sarahweaver · 12m12 minutes ago

Sarah Weaver Retweeted Tony Clement

the Liberals want to triple federal investment in public transit over the next four years, but axed the tax credit to make PT accessible


Samantha McAleese‏ @SamanthaM0428 · 12m12 minutes ago

No more transit tax credit? @JustinTrudeau - Tell us again how you care about the environment? Will @OC_Transpo adjust costs for riders?


Richie Roby 🇨🇦‏ @RichieRoby · 14m14 minutes ago

Richie Roby 🇨🇦 Retweeted HuffPost Canada

The irony that a "progressive" Liberal government would kill a transit tax credit brought in by Conservatives is not lost here. #cdnpoli


Joe Bowser‏ @infil00p · 15m15 minutes ago

Seriously, for lower income Canadians, that's literally their only god damn tax credit, and the Liberals are taking that shit away.



Richard Southern‏Verified account @richard680news · 15m15 minutes ago

Big implications for TTC metro pass users in #Budget2017 The public transit tax credit is gone. Will cost riders hundreds more a year.



adtrace‏ @adtrace · 2m2 minutes ago

Eliminating the public transit tax credit a bizarre inclusion here? Counter to social and environmental objectives


Roz‏ @RedWineRoz · 3m3 minutes ago

Scrapping the public transit tax credit hurts people on lower incomes and the environment @JustinTrudeau #Budget2017


Sarah Gee‏ @_MissGeeGee · 4m4 minutes ago

The biggest complaints on the budget is the tax increase on booze/smokes and the eliminating the trans tax credit #bigdeal #cdnpoli


Toarea Fan‏ @TOareaFan · 6m6 minutes ago

There's your middle class budget....we are taking away the 15% public transit tax credit! Really? #cdnpoli #Budget2017



Tri Luu‏ @TLLuu · 6m6 minutes ago

@gmbutts Is there data to support the public transit tax credit not achieving its stated goals?

hannah martin‏ @hannahmartinn · 8m8 minutes ago

hannah martin Retweeted Justin Trudeau

but what's the point if public transit is too expensive for people to use it? getting rid of the bus pass tax credit was a giant mistake


Sean Joudry‏ @seanjoudry · 10m10 minutes ago


Sean Joudry Retweeted CBC News Alerts

Seriously - they axed the transit tax credit? Ughh.

And they're adding tax to Uber/Lyft? Come on...
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Mar 22, 2017 8:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It isn't as bad as I was expecting. True, a $28 billion deficit is worrisome, but at least they aren't embarking on some big job-creation scheme. We know how well those things do.

And it isn't clear that there's more gender-favouritism than usual. They seem to have built in an annual $20 billion deficit into the budget. This will dramatically increase if we go into the soup ...

Do you get the feeling they're just treading water, and worried about the future? I do, and it's a good thing. This is a time for prudence.
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Mar 23, 2017 7:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Budget 2017: Hello Uber tax, goodbye transit credit

Liberals' 2nd budget also does away with Canada Savings Bonds program while adding pennies to cost of alcohol

By Dean Beeby, CBC News Posted: Mar 22, 2017 5:06 PM ET| Last Updated: Mar 22, 2017 11:45 PM ET

Users of Uber and other ride-sharing services will start paying sales tax, one of the handful of small tax measures in Wednesday's federal budget.

Consumer tax changes in Wednesday's federal budget will add to the cost of Uber rides while ending a public-transit credit.

Those are just two of several Liberal government moves that will hit pocketbooks directly, though modestly.

The measures include slight increases — pennies, in fact — in tobacco and alcohol taxes.

And on the savings side, the budget ends the long-running Canada Savings Bonds program this year, now recognized as an inefficient way for governments to raise money.

Created in 1946 to replace a war-bonds program, savings bond sales have fallen sharply in recent years as the interest rate earned fell behind the savings rates offered at banks and other private institutions.

The government says it will honour the $5 billion of Canada Savings Bonds that are currently outstanding, but won't sell any more.
■ANALYSIS | Liberal budget offers lots of 'vision' but few new numbers: Aaron Wherry

The proposed levy on Uber and other ride-hailing services would for the first time impose GST/HST on fares, in the same way they are charged on traditional taxi services. The change will broaden the definition of a taxi business to ensure Uber and other web-based ride-hailing services are required to charge and remit GST/HST, adding to the cost of each trip.

The effect on federal revenues will be modest, just $3 million in additional revenue in 2017-18, but the budget suggests the measure is to help level the playing field and create tax fairness.

The non-refundable public transit tax credit — a so-called boutique tax credit introduced by the previous Conservative government — will be phased out on July 1. The credit enabled public transit users to apply 15 per cent of their eligible expenses on monthly passes and other fares toward reducing the amount of tax they owe. Ending that tax break is expected to save Ottawa more than $200 million a year.

The increases in so-called sin taxes on alcohol and tobacco come into effect Thursday, adding a penny to the price for a litre of wine, for example, and just over two cents to a litre of spirits.

A 24-pack of beer is going up by five cents, and 200 cigarettes will cost another 53 cents.

The higher excise taxes are expected to put $85 million into government coffers in 2017-18.

Foreign tourists will no longer be eligible for a GST/HST rebate on the cost of their accommodations or tour packages. Once phased in next year, the change will add $15 million in sales taxes to the federal treasury.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politic.....-1.4036893
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Mar 23, 2017 7:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

10 things to know about the 2017-2018 federal budget

by Mike Eppel
Posted Mar 22, 2017 4:53 pm EDT
Last Updated Mar 22, 2017 at 5:34 pm EDT


Finance Minister Bill Morneau tables the federal budget in the House of Commons in Ottawa, Wednesday, March 22, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick


Here are ten things to know about the Liberals government’s 2017-18 budget:

No signs of getting back to balance

Updated numbers show the government has yet to come up with a plan to get back in the black. The deficit for this year will be $23-billion, slightly higher than what was expected in the Fall Economic Statement. But by 2022 Canada will still be in red to the tune of $18.8-billion.

Overall, the budgets for the next five years should be lower than what was predicted in the 2016 budget, but the numbers will appear higher since the government has
brought back the $3-billion contingency fund, which the government can access to address emergency situations or unforeseen fiscal problems.

Very little new spending

Many of the spending announcements in this budget are actually being taken out of funds that were already committed in last year’s budget. All of the funding announced for child care spaces, green buildings, affordable housing and public transit will be coming from the infrastructure funds already allocated in their initial fiscal plan.

Child care

The government is investing $7-billion over 10 years to support and create new child care spaces in Canada. It’s believed this could create up to 40,000 new spaces for low-modest income families. The money will start flowing next year and builds on the $500-million which has already been committed for this year.

Maternity and parental leave

The government is extending the period in which Canadians can claim maternity and parental benefits. On the front end, expectant women will be allowed to start claiming employment insurance maternity benefits 12 weeks before their due date rather than the current eight weeks.

After the child is born, parents will be able to claim EI benefits for a full year and a half, instead of a year under the current system.

The catch is, after 12 months the amount you will be able to claim will drop from 55 per cent of your average weekly earnings, to 33 per cent. That means you’ll be getting a lot less back if you decide to take the extra six months.

Affordable housing

The government will be investing $11.2-billion over 11 years to a range of initiatives in order to build and refurbish Canada’s affordable housing units.

Innovation economy

The budget targets the creation of new economy jobs in six key areas to grow the Canada of the future –advanced manufacturing, agri-food, clean technology, digital industries, health/bio-sciences and clean resources.

Taxing your Friday night

The government will be raising taxes/levies on products and services that could impact your weekend fun. The excise taxes on alcohol and tobacco are being changed and will be increased by up to two per cent. This means you will be paying more for your beers and smokes.

At the end of the evening ride sharing programs like Uber will cost you more since they will be hit with the same GST and HST as taxi cabs. But if you decide to bus it home that could cost you too. The government is eliminating the transit tax credit, which allowed you to claim your bus/subway/LRT passes at tax time.

Crackdown on tax cheats and loopholes

The government is committing to closing tax loopholes and tax planning schemes that disproportionately benefit the wealthy. It is also committing more than $520-million over five years to prevent tax evasion. The Liberals expect to recoup $2.5-billion with these new measures.

Skills training for youth

Expansion of the Youth Employment Strategy — $400-million over three years for skills development and job training for young adults aged 15 to 30 — as well as 15,000 new jobs for youth in the Green Economy.

Defence spending going up … eventually

The budget says the Federal Defence Department can expect an increase in funding but the policy is still under review. An official announcement is due within the coming months.

http://www.citynews.ca/2017/03.....18-budget/
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Thu Mar 23, 2017 11:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't hate it as much as I expected to;
Which must mean that Liberal voters are pulling their hair out.

The removal of the Transit Credit was surprising;
That was always a credit that benefited middle income earners most and potentially represented around 400 bucks a year to a daily commuter.
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Mar 23, 2017 11:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
I don't hate it as much as I expected to;
Which must mean that Liberal voters are pulling their hair out.

The removal of the Transit Credit was surprising;
That was always a credit that benefited middle income earners most and potentially represented around 400 bucks a year to a daily commuter.



the elimination of the public transit tax credit is one thing many people are having a hard time understanding .

the only way its removal makes sense to me as there undoing anything harper and the conservatives did for the sake of undoing that legacy . the bureaucrats behind the scenes must of never liked any of these tax credits cause they gave more money back to the average person

if there trying to encourage more people to use public transit and investing more money to build projects , it really makes no sense to eliminate a credit that encourages its use .
which is why I'd suspect there has to be some other reason for its elimination , of a more partisan nature
as the last budget we saw a couple other similar tory created tax credits eliminated for no real reason
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Mar 24, 2017 8:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Trudeau's budget hurts middle class

Finance Minister Bill Morneau and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau hold copies of the federal budget...

Finance Minister Bill Morneau and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau hold copies of the federal budget on their way to the House of Commons in Ottawa, Wednesday, March 22, 2017. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld)


POSTMEDIA NETWORK
Mar 22, 2017
, Last Updated: 11:48 PM ET


Life just got tougher for the middle class Prime Minister Justin Trudeau claims to care so much about.

His second federal budget released Wednesday lowers middle-class pay cheques by raising employment insurance premiums.

It makes commuting more expensive by eliminating the public transit tax credit and increases the cost of ride-sharing services like Uber.

It raises the price of cigarettes, beer and alcohol.

And, of course, Trudeau will be raising the cost of living for middle-class households by hundreds of dollars annually with his national carbon pricing plan.

Trudeau’s second budget confirms that when he promised Canadians during the 2015 election campaign a few years of modest deficits to pay for Liberal election promises, before balancing the budget, he was either incompetent or fibbing.

During the 2015 election, Trudeau said the Liberals would record a projected deficit of $9.9 billion in 2016-17.

Wednesday’s budget increases it to $23 billion.

During the election, Trudeau said the deficit in 2017-18 would be $9.5 billion.

Wednesday’s budget increases it to $25.5 billion.

During the election, Trudeau said the deficit in 2018-19 would be $5.7 billion.

Wednesday’s budget increases it to $24.4 billion.

During the election, Trudeau said Canada would record a surplus of $1 billion in 2019-20.

Wednesday’s budget says there will be a $20.4 billion deficit in 2019-20, followed by an $18.7 billion deficit in 2020-21 and $15.8 billion in 2021-22, the final year of projections.

Trudeau’s second budget contains no timetable for restoring the nation’s finances to a balanced budget.

He has also abandoned his election promise to reduce the government’s debt-to-GDP ratio, a key indicator of economic health, from 30% to 27% by the end of his first term.

That’s been replaced by a vague statement that the ratio will be lower in 2020-21 than 2016-17, without specifics.

This is what happens to Canada’s finances when reality confronts a prime minister who believes budgets balance themselves, while espousing the Care Bear philosophy that he would grow our economy from the heart outwards.

All Trudeau’s really done is the same old Liberal trick of reaching ever deeper into our wallets.

http://cnews.canoe.com/CNEWS/C.....12440.html
Bugs





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PostPosted: Fri Mar 24, 2017 2:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

When contrasted with Justin's projections/promises, it seems clear that the economic plan they ran on was either crafted entirely for electoral purposes, or they have failed to implement their plan successfully. The gap between promise and reality is simply too big.

Have they simply built in a regular deficit of $20 billion (or more) a year into the budget?

They have put us back on the road to ruin, and for what gain?
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Mar 24, 2017 3:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
When contrasted with Justin's projections/promises, it seems clear that the economic plan they ran on was either crafted entirely for electoral purposes, or they have failed to implement their plan successfully. The gap between promise and reality is simply too big.

Have they simply built in a regular deficit of $20 billion (or more) a year into the budget?

They have put us back on the road to ruin, and for what gain?


since they seem to be following Dalton Mcguinty's roadmap , I'd have to say what they ran on was crafted entirely for the election and what they felt would allow them to gain new seats and possibly form government . there primary concern was to remove harper from power and elect more liberal mp's to parliament


I don't think there was much long term consideration put into there platform back in 2015
Bugs





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PostPosted: Sat Mar 25, 2017 2:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Trudeau's popularity takes hit

BY ANTONELLA ARTUSO, TORONTO SUN
FIRST POSTED: SATURDAY, MARCH 25, 2017 09:20 AM EDT | UPDATED: SATURDAY,

The Justin Trudeau Liberals are now trailing the Conservatives slightly after delivering a widely unpopular budget this week, a Forum Research poll shows.

Dr. Lorne Bozinoff, president of Forum Research, said there were several items that drew a strong negative response in Thursday’s budget and that added up to a drop in popular support for the government.

The cancellation of a tax credit for public transit users, the end of Canada Savings Bonds and higher taxes on alcohol turned off many Canadians.

“When you add it all up, probably everyone has something they don’t like about the budget,” Bozinoff said Friday.

The federal Liberals are now the first choice of 36% of decided and leaning voters, down from 39% last month.

Meanwhile, the Conservatives, who are in a leadership campaign, have the support of 38%, up from 35% at the end of February.

The NDP stands pat with 15% support, the Bloc Quebecois are down one point to 6% and the Green Party remains at 4%.

Four in 10 Canadians polled did not like Trudeau’s second budget and roughly the same number of people said they would be less likely to vote Liberal in the next federal election because of it.

Only 14% approved of the budget, while another 36% had no opinion and 10% said they didn’t know.

Perhaps more worrisome for the governing Liberals was the poll finding that 37% believe the budget will be bad for the economy and 41% think it will hurt the middle class, a key voting demographic.

Another 31% conclude the budget will have a neutral effect on the middle class and 10% see it as a good thing for that group.

“These budgets that continually increase taxes or phase out tax credits, which is kind of the same thing in people’s minds...I think they become a bit much for people,” Bozinoff said. “And I think that’s what they were feeling about some of these items.”

Budget commitments to enhance parental leave and child care services received a positive response, but Bozinoff said the loss of the tax credit for public transit appears to have really soured Canadians on the Liberals’ fiscal plan.Across Canada, Liberal support held in British Columbia and Quebec, but dipped a bit in the Atlantic Region and plunged in the prairies and Ontario.

Forum Research surveyed 1,029 Canadian voters and the results are considered accurate plus or minus 3%, 19 times out of 20.

aartuso@postmedia.com

**********

Something else that won't fly:

Privatizing the country’s airports is opposed by 45% of Canadians, a Forum Research poll found.

The Justin Trudeau government has been pondering the sell off of some of the country’s largest airports to generate billions of dollars — money it could use to fund its major infrastructure plans.

Forum Research uncovered strong opposition to the idea although about one-quarter of those polled were undecided and one in 10 liked the idea.

The pollster noted a mixed reaction when floating other budget items past voters.

Big yawn:

A significant number of people — 35% — couldn’t care less about the end of Canada Savings Bonds but 26% are not happy about this. Another 21% were okay with their demise, and 19% had no opinion.

Loved it:

Most Canadians polled support the fed’s new investment in childcare (52%) and almost half backed the increased parental leave in the budget.

Hated it:

Canadians were not pleased that the budget ends the popular tax credit for transit passes. The poll found that 37% think that’s a bad move with only 16% supporting it.

More taxes please:

Almost half (46%) of Canadians liked the increased tax on alcohol announced in the budget, while 37% gave it the thumbs down.
http://www.ottawasun.com/2017/.....-of-budget
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