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RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Nov 11, 2016 7:52 am    Post subject: Canadian officials preparing for a surge in Mexican migrants Reply with quote

( its looking like trudeau's decision to eliminate the visa requirement for Mexican tourists was just plain dumb as now they are preparing for a surge in Mexican migrants )



Canadian officials preparing for potential flood of Mexican migrants after Trump wins presidency

Tourist visa will no longer be required for Mexican visitors as of Dec. 1

By Kathleen Harris, CBC News Posted: Nov 10, 2016 8:53 PM ET| Last Updated: Nov 10, 2016 8:53 PM ET


The federal government is preparing for a potential surge in Mexican migrants coming to Canada after Donald Trump's election victory, CBC News has learned.

Sources confirm high level meetings took place this week with officials at Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada and in other departments.

The news comes as Canada prepares to loosen rules for Mexicans to enter the country by lifting a visa requirement on Dec. 1. That restriction has been in place since 2009.

Talks on a plan to cope with a possible spike in asylum-seekers have been ongoing for some time, but were accelerated this week after Trump's surprise win.
■Donald Trump's Mexican border talk
■Canada drops Mexican visa as of Dec. 1

Trump campaigned on promises to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border and to swiftly deport undocumented workers and illegal residents.

Lawyer predicts 'significant impact'

Toronto-based immigration lawyer Lorne Waldman expects an increase in refugee claims from Mexicans once the visa requirement is lifted. He also predicts a "significant impact" from Trump's election.

"The government was very concerned about the potential for a large number of new claims coming from Mexico, and that's why they hesitated for so long before announcing that they were going to remove the visa," he said.

President-elect Donald Trump addressing supporters in New Hampshire
U.S. president-elect Donald Trump has promised to build a wall along the Mexican border and deport undocumented workers illegally in the country. (Steven Senne/The Associated Press)

"And that announcement was made before anyone knew that Donald Trump, with his very different immigration policies from those of the current administration, won the election."

But Waldman cautioned it's too early to tell exactly how the situation may unfold, saying it will depend on whether Trump follows through on his campaign pledges.

When Trump first launched his presidential bid in June 2015, he took sharp aim at Mexico, suggesting the country was unleashing criminals in to the country.

"They're sending people that have lots of problems and they're bringing their problems," he said. "They're bringing drugs, they're bringing crime, they're rapists and some I assume are good people, but I speak to border guards and they tell us what we are getting."
■Trump's tough stand on illegal immigration

In August last year, he released an eight-page policy paper on immigration that outlined plans to build a multi-billion-dollar wall along the Mexican border, but force Mexico to pay for it. He also vowed to detain and deport undocumented migrants and triple the number of U.S. immigration officers.

And just this September, he reiterated his hard-line commitment to remove illegal migrants en masse.

"There will be no amnesty," Trump said at an Arizona rally. "Our message to the world will be this: You cannot obtain legal status or become a citizen of the United States by illegally entering our country."

Potential abuse flagged

The possible Trump effect is on top of what some have flagged as a potential for immigration system abuse with the lifting of the visa requirement.

Conservative Immigration critic Michelle Rempel said the Stephen Harper government imposed the restriction in 2009 after ballooning numbers of bogus refugee claims from Mexico.

Mexico contradicts Donald Trump on paying for border wall


She accused the Liberals of making an "arbitrary" decision to lift the restriction without doing a formal study of the potential impact, or establishing new measures to prevent abuse.

"You don't impose a visa on a nation that's close to us in terms of trade unless there's a serious, discernible problem. And there was," she said.


Source: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
.

Asylum claims by Mexican visitors to Canada declined following the imposition of a tourist visa by the former Conservative government. The visa requirement will be lifted on Dec. 1.

If there is suddenly a dramatic rise in asylum claims, that will "give pause" for the American government and for Canadians, she said.

Once in Canada, refugee claimants are entitled to a suite of benefits, including health care, until a decision is rendered in their case.

Longstanding issue

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced the plan to lift the requirement during a visit by Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto on June 28. During that meeting, Mexico announced it would fully reopen its market to Canadian beef in October.

A senior official in the office of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Minister John McCallum confirmed the government is sticking with the Dec. 1 date to lift the visa.

What could Trump's victory mean for Canada?


"Our officials are working with Canadian Border Services Agency (CBSA) and Mexican officials to lay the groundwork for the visa lift, including measures to identify and deter irregular migration. And we'll continue to monitor migration patterns post-lift," the official said.

CBSA said a potential spike in migrants is speculative at this time.

"It is business as usual at our designated ports of entry, this includes processing any refugee claimants," said spokeswoman Esme Bailey. "The CBSA processes over 90 million travellers a year and routinely monitors its operations to ensure proper resources."

Asylum claims way down




The number of Mexican claims referred to the Immigration and Refugee Board was climbing dramatically until it peaked at 9,511 in 2009. After the visa requirement was imposed, it dropped to 1,349, then continued to shrink to only 120 in 2015. Between January and June this year, there were only 60 cases, according to the most recent figures available.

Government officials had suggested the visa requirement could be reinstated if the number of asylum claims from Mexico reaches 3,500 in any given year. But a news release announcing the policy did not mention any conditions attached to the change.

Vancouver-based immigration lawyer Richard Kurland called that cap a "close the barn door after the horse has bolted" policy. He said the government should carefully track weekly intake and "flip the switch" if it exceeds, for example, 100 cases.

"It is foolish to know claims will exceed 3,500 in a year, and do nothing during the year," he said. "We have the technology to be more nimble."

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politic.....-1.3845957
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Nov 11, 2016 11:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( here is the official announcement from the PM , this may go down as one of trudeau's dumber decisions when Canada starts to get flooded with "fake " Mexican refugee's and migrant's once again , although they might not stay once they realise how cold it is here )


Canada to lift visa requirements for Mexico

News
» Canada to lift visa requirements for Mexico


Ottawa, Ontario ‑


June 28, 2016


The Government of Canada has made it a top priority to re-establish and strengthen our relationship with one of our most important partners, Mexico. To this end, Prime Minister Trudeau today announced Canada’s intention to lift the visa requirement for Mexican visitors to Canada beginning December 1, 2016. Lifting the visa requirement will deepen ties between Canada and Mexico and will increase the flow of travellers, ideas, and businesses between both countries.

Closer collaboration between Canada and Mexico on mobility issues will also help encourage travel between the two countries while preventing any increase in asylum claims or other irregular migration. Officials plan to meet regularly to promote these mutual interests.

Canadian officials are working with their Mexican counterparts on final details to ensure a successful visa lift.

Until November 30, 2016, the visa requirement is still in place for Mexico and – until it is lifted – Mexican citizens must continue to apply for a visa to visit, study or work in Canada. Mexicans can apply online for a visitor visa on Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada’s website, or can use the services of one of the Visa Application Centres in Mexico City, Guadalajara and Monterrey.

Visitors are generally allowed a six-month stay from the day they enter Canada. If the Border Services Officer authorizes a stay of less than six months, they will indicate in the visitor’s passport the date by which they must leave Canada.

After the visa requirement is lifted, Mexicans wanting to work or study in Canada will still need to apply for a work or study permit prior to their arrival in Canada. Mexican citizens should also be aware that – once the visa is lifted – they will need an Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA) to fly or transit through Canada. Applying for an eTA is a simple, inexpensive (CAD$7) process that takes just minutes to complete online. The eTA is electronically linked to a traveler’s passport, and is valid for five years or until the passport expires, whichever comes first. All visa-exempt foreign nationals – except for U.S. citizens – need an eTA to fly to or transit through Canada.

Additional information will be provided to Mexican citizens in advance of the visa lift, including details on when Mexicans travellers can begin applying for their eTA.

http://www.pm.gc.ca/eng/news/2.....nts-mexico
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Nov 16, 2016 8:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( liberals now say the visa requirement could be re-stated if claims spike too much , so why are they removing it in the first place if they know it might be a bad idea ? )


John McCallum says Mexican visa could be 'reimposed' if refugee claims spike

Officials preparing for possible mass wave of migrants after Donald Trump's victory

By Kathleen Harris, CBC News Posted: Nov 15, 2016 5:08 PM ET| Last Updated: Nov 15, 2016 5:08 PM ET

Immigration Minister John McCallum said a Mexican visa requirement could be 'reimposed' if too many asylum-seekers come to Canada.


Canada is prepared to reinstate a visa requirement for Mexican travellers if the number of refugee claims jumps too high, says Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Minister John McCallum.

The visa lift is set to kick in Dec. 1. McCallum said the federal government was aware of a possible spike in asylum-seekers long before Donald Trump was elected president in the U.S.

"There would come a point where a visa could be reimposed," he said but would not specify what number of claims might trigger that. "Canada retains its sovereignty on this issue. There comes a point where it would become unsustainable, but we are hoping that point will not arrive."

CBC News has learned officials at IRCC and other departments have held high-level meetings to discuss a potential flood of Mexican asylum-seekers due to both the visa lift and the result of the U.S. election.

Benefit 'outweighed' risk

Trump campaigned on promises to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border and to swiftly deport undocumented workers and illegal residents.

Campaign 2016 Trump Hotel
President-elect Donald Trump has said he wants to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border and deport residents illegally in the country. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta) (Manuel Balce Ceneta/Associated Press)


Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced the plan to lift the visa requirement during a visit by Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto on June 28. During that meeting, Mexico announced it would fully reopen its market to Canadian beef in October.

A senior immigration official said Tuesday that a review was carried out in the run-up to that announcement and a number of risks were identified. But he declined to provide details or recommendations because it was "advice to the minister."

Testifying to the immigration and citizenship committee by video from Mexico City, Olivier Jacques, IRCC's area director for Latin America, acknowledged that more Mexicans could arrive from the U.S., and others directly from Mexico, due to changes.


'The assessment of the government is that the benefit related to a visa lift outweighed any identified risk we have with these migrants.'

- Olivier Jacques, IRCC's area director for Latin America

Jacques said various criteria are reviewed to assess a country's "readiness" for a visa lift. In Mexico's case, those risks were measured against Canada's "unique relationship" with the country, including geographic proximity and the close trade relationship within NAFTA.

"At this point, the assessment of the government is that the benefit related to a visa lift outweighed any identified risk we have with these migrants," he said.

Trade, tourism boost

During the daily question period Tuesday, Conservative immigration critic Michelle Rempel pointed to that testimony and asked why the Liberals "blatantly" ignored the red flags in a rush to lift the visa requirement.

But McCallum said there are benefits associated with the visa lift, including increased trade and tourism.

"We are very happy to welcome more Mexican tourists to this country and to accept the jobs that go along with that."

McCallum reiterated that Canada made the agreement with Mexico in June, before Trump's presidential win.

"We went into partnership with the Mexican government to minimize those risks, so obviously we were aware of them from the beginning," he said.


Under the previous Conservative government of Stephen Harper, Canada imposed the visa requirement due to a huge rise in refugee claims that were subsequently rejected for being invalid.

The number of Mexican claims referred to the Immigration and Refugee Board was climbing dramatically until it peaked at 9,511 in 2009. After the visa requirement was imposed, it dropped to 1,349, then continued to shrink to just 120 in 2015. Between January and June this year, there were only 60 cases, according to the most recent figures available

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politic.....-1.3851904
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Jan 10, 2017 8:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mexican refugee claims jump after visa requirement dropped

U.S. President-elect Donald Trump's promise to deport illegal residents could drive more Mexicans north

By Kathleen Harris, CBC News Posted: Jan 10, 2017 5:00 AM ET| Last Updated: Jan 10, 2017 5:38 AM ET



At least 70 Mexicans claimed refugee status in Canada the first month after the federal government lifted a visa requirement for travellers from Mexico.

The one-month figure brings the total number of Mexican refugee claims for 2016 to 248, compared to 111 in 2015, according to figures provided by the Canada Border Services Agency.

The policy change took effect on Dec. 1, 2016.

"We anticipated there would be if not an immediate spike, a surge, and it seems that is what's happening," Conservative Foreign Affairs critic Peter Kent told CBC News.

The Conservatives imposed a visa requirement in 2009 after a rise in refugee claims from Mexico that were ultimately rejected as invalid.


The number of Mexican claims referred to the Immigration and Refugee Board peaked at 9,511 in 2009. After the visa requirement was imposed, the number of claims dropped to 1,349 for 2010, then continued to shrink over the years.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced the plan to lift the visa requirement during a visit by Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto to Ottawa on June 28, 2016. During that meeting, Mexico announced it would fully reopen its market to Canadian beef.

Kent said the shift was a flawed policy decision, based on politics rather than evidence.

'Unwise' campaign promise

"This is yet another unwise campaign promise that the government seems determined to fulfil despite the lack of any data that would support the removal of the visa requirement," Kent said.

But Janet Dench, executive director of the Canadian Council for Refugees, sees the increase in refugee claims as a positive development.

"It means that people whose lives may be at risk are able to find protection in Canada," she said. "We look at it in terms of the number of lives saved; people who are able to escape possible torture or serious harm."

Along with the visa requirement lift, Dench said the election of U.S. president-elect Donald Trump could also drive up the number of asylum-seekers in the coming months. Trump campaigned on promises to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border and to swiftly deport undocumented workers and illegal residents.

Mexico Trump
U.S. President-elect Donald Trump has promised to move quickly to remove undocumented workers and illegal residents in the U.S. (Evan Vucci/Associated Press)

Dench said those promises have put a "fear into the hearts" of some Mexicans, who could seek refuge north of the border.

"That's something that might affect the overall numbers of Mexicans in the coming months if the incoming president does go ahead with some of his threats in terms of harsh measures against people living without status in the U.S.," she said.


$262M price tag


An internal government regulatory cost analysis released in November 2016 found that lifting the visa requirement for Mexican travellers is expected to cost about $262 million over the next decade, in part to deal with a potential surge in asylum seekers. The report says the overall cost of the policy shift will be $433.5 million over 10 years.

According to the analysis, those costs would be offset in part by an estimated $171.6 million linked to a boost in tourism from Mexico and an increase in investment and trade opportunities.

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Minister John McCallum has said he will monitor the number of refugee claims and could reinstate the visa if it climbs too high.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politic.....-1.3927178
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Canadian officials preparing for a surge in Mexican migrants

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