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Toronto Centre





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PostPosted: Wed Dec 14, 2016 7:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What is funny and emerging is that Pot use, much like alcohol use and of course all other drug use DROPPED after prohibition was repealed.

Portugal, Colorado, Washington. All use is down.
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Dec 14, 2016 8:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Toronto Centre wrote:
What is funny and emerging is that Pot use, much like alcohol use and of course all other drug use DROPPED after prohibition was repealed.

Portugal, Colorado, Washington. All use is down.



maybe the novelty wore off once it was legal

what I don't get is the liberals at the same time are attacking and going after smoking and vaping , saying there both bad ? and then somehow claim we need legalised marijuana instead ?

they have such a confusing message on smoking at the moment , how can one be good and the others bad ? isn't all smoking bad for people's health ?

wouldn't someone vaping be better than them smoking marijuana ? the people I've seen vaping when I was downtown , it never bothered me and the smell was actually very appealing but the though of walking by people high smoking pot is rather disgusting to me and the smell would bother me
Bugs





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PostPosted: Thu Dec 15, 2016 2:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The illegality was and probably is still part of it's mystique. I mean, if it's so good that it's illegal, it must be the highest recommendation you can get. It's like the Queen herself telling us that this is too good for the likes of us!

Because you know they all do it.

That's a big part of it. Here's, smoke this .... and you're back in the 60ies, when drugs were cheap and dyn-o-mite, when the most feared sexually transmitted disease was herpes! When the girls took off their panty girdles and donned the miniskirt. And the pill arrived.

And rock and roll discovered electricity! You know the whole thing, you probably were once enthralled in it yourself.

And when the cops were square.

It's the culture of our time. It's a reflection, perhaps an 'advance' of the idealistic attitudes that were common at the time. The late John Lennon and Madonna probably aren't as far apart as you think. Bob Dylan just won the Nobel Prize for literature and didn't go there to pick up the prize! What does that tell you?

The point is, when marijuana becomes another commodity, like a fine wine, it loses this mystique. It may acquire another in compensation, but it often becomes stigmatized in third world countries.
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Dec 15, 2016 8:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the Ontario government is not expecting to make a lot of extra tax revenues off this )


No provincial jackpot expected from legal weed


Most of the revenue earned will go back into control measures, Ontario finance minister says.



By Robert BenzieQueen's Park Bureau Chief

Wed., Dec. 14, 2016



Marijuana will not be the pot of Colombian gold at the end of the rainbow for the cash-strapped provincial treasury.

That was the message at Queen’s Park on Wednesday in the wake of a federal task force report on implementing Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s pledge to legalize recreational marijuana.

Finance Minister Charles Sousa, who hopes to eliminate the province’s $4.3 billion deficit in the 2017-18 budget, insisted the government is not expecting weed cash to be rolling in.

“Whatever we’re getting in is being reinvested to control the substance and the system. It’s not being seen as a means to balance the books or provide for revenue,” Sousa told the Star.

“For us, the benefit of any revenue would be to go into programs,” he said, pointing to public education, health, and motor safety initiatives.

The treasurer said because legalized marijuana will not be sold at the LCBO — the federal task force recommended “no co-location of alcohol or tobacco and cannabis sales” — it won’t be the cash bonanza some had expected.

“With liquor, it’s a huge dividend. Of course that distribution is completely different than what it would be with marijuana. (The LCBO are) wholesalers, they’re major distributors, they’re retailers, it’s a different system,” he said.

A Deloitte report in October estimated that marijuana could balloon to a $22.6-billion industry in Canada, eclipsing combined sales of beer, wine, and spirits.

The company calculated that feeding the market would mean growing 600,000 kilograms of weed annually, which is far more than the existing 36 Health Canada-licensed producers grow for medicinal purposes.

Attorney General Yasir Naqvi predicted there will be costs associated with legalized weed.

“The revenues that are going to be raised most likely are going to be reinvested back in ensuring that we are protecting youth and the vulnerable, that we are enhancing both public health and safety,” said Naqvi.

“We do know we will have to make a significant investment around the legal use of cannabis. One example is on road safety. We know that data has shown from other jurisdictions that incidents of impaired driving have gone up,” he said.

As for the age limit for using marijuana, Naqvi, mindful that Ontario’s legal drinking age is 19, said no decisions have been made.

“They talked about a minimum age of 18,” he said, referring to the federal panel. “They did not preclude any higher age limit.”

At Queen’s Park, there are bureaucrats from a dozen departments working on the province’s strategy for marijuana in anticipation of Trudeau’s government legalizing it next year.

Public servants from the Ministries of Finance, Health, Education, Transportation, the Attorney General, Community Safety and Correctional Services, Municipal Affairs, Children and Youth Services, Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation, Community and Social Services, the Treasury Board secretariat, and the cabinet office are involved in the effort.

https://www.thestar.com/news/queenspark/2016/12/14/no-provincial-jackpot-expected-from-legal-weed.html
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Dec 15, 2016 8:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Liberals must get it right on pot


Postmedia Network

First posted: Wednesday, December 14, 2016 06:39 PM EST | Updated: Wednesday, December 14, 2016 06:46 PM EST



Prime Minister Justin Trudeau campaigned to legalize pot in the 2015 election campaign.

This federal task force report on the subject released this week offered no quick fix to the complex issues surrounding legalization, and the sensible recommendation that the Liberals proceed slowly.

The 106-page report made more than 80 recommendations – including restricting pot sales to those 18 and older, banning sales near schools, banning pot advertising and branding (similar to tobacco products) and a new, proposed Cannabis Control Act to police illegal production and trafficking.

Marijuana consumption is an estimated $7 billion-a-year underground business in Canada, and that market could grow to $10 billion to $20 billion with legalization.

Legalization is also broadly supported by the Canadian public.

Meanwhile, the case for criminalization is increasingly difficult to support.

Canada needs to reconcile the agreements it made via international treaties to criminalize and prosecute drug possession and production with legalization in this country.

But our decades old “war on drugs” has failed miserably to deter drug use or abuse. Few possession cases are prosecuted, policing cannabis costs taxpayers at least $300 million per year and the illegal pot trade has funneled billions of dollars into the hands of organized crime, fueling violence and criminal activity ranging from prostitution to gun running.

However, our current Prime Minister’s plan to legalize pot, in addition to putting billions into the hands of government, also has the potential to cause significant harm.

Teenagers in Canada already use cannabis more than in any other developed country according to the World Health Organization – with 28 per cent of all 15-year-olds in this country saying they’ve tried pot.

Medical experts warn the brain continues to develop until age 25, and young people can be both harmed and become more susceptible to addiction following significant, early drug use. So 19, and perhaps even 21, may be a more appropriate age.

Most importantly, task force recommendations that money from legal marijuana sales should go to education, research and enforcement must be taken seriously and form part of the government`s legislation, expected in 2017.

Getting it all right will be no easy task.

http://www.torontosun.com/2016.....ght-on-pot
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Dec 15, 2016 4:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

trudeau seems to think that 18 is an ok age , although other groups have said it should be older , but personally I don't see how they can even enforce an 18 year age limit yet alone a 21 year age limit , it sounds unrealistic from what I've seen )


Trudeau: 18 is a “reasonable compromise” for minimum age on pot

Trudeau responds to recommendation from cannabis legalization task force

Kyle Duggan

Thursday, December 15th, 2016


Prime Minister Justin Trudeau gave something of an endorsement to the marijuana legalization task force’s recommendation to set a minimum age of 18 for recreational marijuana use.

Asked about the report’s recommendation by reporters at a news conference Thursday, Trudeau replied that 18 or 19 would be a “reasonable compromise” for a minimum age for recreational pot, putting it in line with the age of majority across provinces.

Trudeau said in French that there’s a need to accommodate both concerns about marijuana use and the reality that people younger than 18 are smoking marijuana.

The report suggested the government sets the minimum age at 18 and let provinces raise it beyond that as desired.

Earlier this week, when the report was released, the heads of the government’s Task Force on Cannabis Legalization and Regulation — Anne McLellan and Dr. Mark Ware — called finding a minimum age one of the thorniest issues they had to tackle.

The report said that setting the limit for legal access too high could “result in a range of unintended consequences, such as leading those consumers to continue to purchase cannabis on the illicit market.”

It also recommended the government still actively discourage people aged 18 to 25 from consuming cannabis because the substance can still have negative effects on the developing brain in that age range.

Conservative Health Critic Colin Carrie criticized the proposal to set 18 as the minimum age earlier this week, calling it “particularly troubling” given concerns about the drug’s effects on the brain up to age 25, and noted the Canadian Medical Association had recommended an age limit of 21.

Trudeau also said Thursday that he still has confidence in the government’s stated time frame to announce the new legislation to legalize recreational marijuana in spring 2017.

http://ipolitics.ca/2016/12/15.....ge-on-pot/
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Dec 16, 2016 10:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( wynne no longer thinks the LCBO should be given a monopoly over marijuana sales in Ontario but still thinks they could have a role ? but the report said NO to marijuana sales along side alcohol , how could they still have a role as there stores only sell alcohol ? she makes no sense )


Kathleen Wynne not ruling out LCBO having role in marijuana sales


Premier Kathleen Wynne is keeping an open mind about what — if any — role the Liquor Control Board of Ontario will have in the recreational marijuana business.


While Premier Kathleen Wynne had mused about the LCBO selling marijuana in its 650 stores alongside wine, beer, and spirits, she has come to the conclusion that’s not a good idea.




By Robert BenzieQueen's Park Bureau Chief

Thu., Dec. 15, 2016



Premier Kathleen Wynne is keeping an open mind about what — if any — role the Liquor Control Board of Ontario will have in the recreational marijuana business.

In her first public statement since Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s federal task force on legalization released its recommendations Tuesday, Wynne was noncommittal when asked about the LCBO’s involvement in cannabis sales.

“I really believe that this is all in process and I think it’s good that we’re starting to hear some directional information from the federal government,” she told reporters in Montreal after a meeting with Quebec Premier Philippe Couillard.

“But we’re going to let this play out and then we’ll engage with the federal government on next steps in our individual jurisdictions.”

While Wynne had mused about the province’s booze monopoly selling marijuana in its 650 stores alongside wine, beer, and spirits, she has come to the conclusion that’s not a good idea.

“It may not even be sold out of the LCBO. Because I’ve had people say to me we don’t want to have marijuana and alcohol sold out of the same places,” she told the Star in July, pointing out the government agency could instead be involved in “regulation and distribution and monitoring it in some way.”

The federal task force report, which is the blueprint for legislation being introduced next year and taking effect in 2018 or 2019, recommended “no co-location of alcohol or tobacco and cannabis sales, wherever possible.”

“When co-location cannot be avoided, appropriate safeguards must be put in place,” the report said, urging “limits on the density and location of storefronts, including appropriate distance from schools, community centres, public parks, etc.”


It also advised that marijuana could be sold through “dedicated storefronts with well-trained, knowledgeable staff” and “a direct-to-consumer mail-order system.”

At Queen’s Park — where bureaucrats from a dozen departments are developing the province’s marijuana strategy — no decisions have yet been made about what Ontario’s retail model will look like.

That means the LCBO could control distribution, with government-regulated marijuana then sold through pharmacies such as Shoppers Drug Mart.

Or there might be separate LCBO-run stores for marijuana that do not sell alcohol.

Meanwhile, the liquor giant is awaiting its marching orders from the province.

“The process to legalize and regulate recreational marijuana is still underway at the federal level,” said the LCBO’s Genevieve Tomney.

“LCBO would take direction from the provincial government as to any role it may have in retailing cannabis.

“It is premature to speculate as to what that role may be, but we are paying close attention to the process as it unfolds and reviewing publicly available information, including the task force’s report.”


https://www.thestar.com/news/queenspark/2016/12/15/kathleen-wynne-not-ruling-out-lcbo-having-role-in-marijuana-sales.html
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Dec 16, 2016 3:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( they obviously have to clear this up , you can't have a situation where the law says its illegal but the government keeps saying its going to be made legal . and someone could still get a criminal record for even a minor possession charge , this is clearly a situation that needs to be cleared up one way or another . I personally don't like the idea of legalisation but once you've told people its going to happen , it makes little sense to still be enforcing the law on them )



Trudeau says current pot law stands until new legislation is ratified

Cannabis activists open six shops in Montreal in defiance of current law


Canadian Press

Friday, December 16th, 2016


MONTREAL — Ottawa is moving “properly and responsibly” to legalize marijuana but the current law governing cannabis will stand until new legislation is ratified, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Friday.

Cannabis activists opened six shops in Montreal on Thursday in defiance of the current law and said they are considering opening another in Trudeau’s riding in the city.

Longtime marijuana advocate Marc Emery said Trudeau would be as much of a criminal as them if they were arrested.

Trudeau’s response to a question about that comment was as follows: “Until we’ve changed the law, the current laws exist and apply.”

“The reason we are legalizing and controlling marijuana is not for any other reason than to better protect our kids and to remove the black market, the criminal elements, organized crime, from profiting massively from the sale of cannabis,” he told a news conference alongside Quebec Premier Philippe Couillard.

“We will get this done properly and responsibly because that is what Canadians expect us to do. . and until we have changed the law, the current laws apply.”

The pot boutiques opened in Montreal in the presence of two well-known marijuana activists from Vancouver behind the Cannabis Culture stores and brand.

Jodie Emery told a news conference at one of the stores that while they are illegal under current federal legislation, she hopes local authorities will leave them be.

Under store policy, anyone 19 and older will be able to buy marijuana, without membership or medical requirements. The shops will pay taxes, employ locals and won’t allow children inside.

She was accompanied by her husband Marc, the self-styled “Prince of Pot” who was extradited in 2010 to the United States, where he pleaded guilty to selling marijuana seeds and was sentenced to five years in prison.

“Anyone who enforces this despicable law is indeed a despicable person — and I include politicians, elected officials, police authorities and anyone else who thinks we should be arrested,” he said.

Ottawa is expected to table legislation in the spring to legalize marijuana, while a federal task force recommended earlier this week that sales be allowed to Canadians 18 years and older.

http://ipolitics.ca/2016/12/16.....-ratified/
RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Dec 17, 2016 11:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Legal weed will be ridiculously profitable — and a huge headache

iPolitics Insights

The Trudeau government may have no clear idea of what it’s taking on


Alan Freeman



Friday, December 16th, 2016


When I was a young man, my brother owned a VW Beetle. It was a pretty reliable car and highly praised for its air-cooled engine, which eliminated the need for a radiator. For Canadians, that unfortunately came with a big downside. Without excess heat from the radiator, the car had no effective way of heating the interior or defrosting the windows.

My enduring memory of driving with my brother in the frigid Montreal winter was sitting in the passenger seat, shivering intensely and furiously scraping the inside of the tiny front windshield so he could have at least a blurry view of the traffic ahead of us.

So I read with some interest the way the task force on the legalization of cannabis sees the landscape facing Canada as we move towards becoming the first major developed nation to legalize recreational marijuana. “Like scraping ice from the car windows on a cold winter morning, we believe that we can now see enough to move forward,” this week’s report said. I wasn’t reassured.

Don’t get me wrong. I understand the arguments in favour of legalization — that recreational use of cannabis is already widespread, that most of it is controlled by criminal elements who have no concern for the quality of the product and its impact on society. And does it really make sense for our police forces to be wasting so much time and effort on arresting pot users? The report notes that 49,577 of the 96,423 police-registered drug charges in 2015 were for possession of cannabis.

Yet the report and its 80 recommendations makes for sobering reading. It shows how hugely complicated setting up a national regime to regulate the growing, sale and distribution of cannabis will be, let alone dealing with the health impacts and the surge in impaired driving cases that inevitably will result.

And it’s unclear whether the federal, provincial and municipal governments will have the time to pass legislation and regulations quickly enough to avoid a chaotic situation where cannabis is effectively decriminalized but there is no coherent system to regulate it.

What the report points out is that this is going to be a very big business. The report estimated the value of the current illegal market for cannabis at $7 billion. Growing pot is a low-cost business and the margins are huge. Why else would the LCBO and Shoppers Drug Mart (which, incidentally, got out of selling cigarettes a few years ago for the sake of public health) be so anxious to get a piece of the action?

open quote 761b1bThis may be one of the most difficult public policy measures the Trudeau government undertakes — one that will require a complex series of regulations, careful negotiations with the provinces and full engagement by police, health care professionals and parents.

In October, Shoppers applied for a federal permit to distribute medical marijuana. It’s seen as the first step in an effort to gain access to the vast market for recreational pot that will open after federal legislation legalizing the stuff gets through Parliament.

Earlier this year, Galen Weston Jr. — who heads the family’s Loblaws supermarket chain, the parent of Shoppers — told the company’s annual meeting, “We’re an industry that is extremely effective at managing controlled substances.”

It’s unclear how a bid for a slice of the recreational side of the pot market by a big retailer would fare if the recommendations of the task force report were all implemented. The report suggests no changes in the current system of medical marijuana distribution, which limits distribution of cannabis to mail order, and indicates that it would like to limit future retail sales of recreational marijuana to specialty operators, what it calls “dedicated storefronts with well-trained, knowledgeable staff.”

But there are other possibilities for big business as well. Edible cannabis has proven to be hugely popular. Cannabis-laced coffee, chocolates, cakes, candies and the inevitable brownies have been immensely successful in states like Colorado. And edible forms of cannabis are much more attractive to those who might be reluctant to smoke the stuff — including children. That’s led to a big increase in cases of cannabis ingestion by children reported to U.S. poison-control centers.

But big business may find that much of the market has already been snapped up by smaller players who won’t bother to wait for legalization. In Montreal this week, Marc Emery, Canada’s self-styled Prince of Pot, wasted no time in using the publicity surrounding the task force report to give out free samples of weed as he opened the first of eight Cannabis Culture retail outlets he plans for the city.

“Who wants a free nug?” he said, as enthusiasts crowded around. Emery is clearly breaking the law and has openly challenged Montreal Mayor Denis Coderre to go through with his threat to shut down his operation.

Emery, who has been arrested dozens of times for illegal sales of marijuana and served four and a half years in a U.S. prison, clearly sees himself as a kind of bong-toting Martin Luther King Jr. “We are using civil obedience to change the law,” he crowed. Of course, he’s already won that fight. The law will be changed. What his Montreal show was about is marketing — and grabbing as much market share as he can for his fledgling national retail chain.

What this week’s report shows is that this may be one of the most difficult public policy measures the Trudeau government undertakes — one that will require a complex series of regulations, careful negotiations with the provinces and full engagement by police, health care professionals and parents.

By legalizing cannabis, government will be giving the product its seal of approval, encouraging millions of Canadians who were reluctant to break the law in the past to at least try it out. At the same time, the task force points out that it doesn’t want use to spread among children and it’s concerned about the impact on vulnerable young people and a possible spike in impaired driving, made scarier by the fact there’s no effective system for police to do roadside testing.

We should all remember what Colorado Governor John Heckenlooper said about legalization of marijuana. “This is about the hardest, most complicated thing in public that I’ve ever had to work on.”

I sure hope Justin Trudeau has a good ice scraper. It’s going to be a while before he’ll be able to see through that windshield.

http://ipolitics.ca/2016/12/16.....-headache/
RCO





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PostPosted: Sun Dec 18, 2016 10:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( there new cannabis stores in Montreal , lasted about 1 day by the sounds of this article )



Montreal mayor defends police raid on illegal cannabis boutiques



The Canadian Press

Saturday, December 17th, 2016


Montreal’s mayor said Saturday that police were doing their jobs and upholding the law when they launched raids against newly opened illegal cannabis stores.

Denis Coderre said that opening the stores was a pointless stunt since federal legislation to legalize marijuana is expected in the spring.

“What I don’t understand is, legalization of marijuana is going to happen, so why do this kind of stunt?” he told reporters at an unrelated event in Montreal.

Police said they arrested 10 people Friday in the raids on the cannabis stores that opened one day before by the self-styled “Prince of Pot,” Marc Emery, and his wife, Jodie.

All but one person, who refused to sign the release documents, were released on a promise to appear in court.

Local television outlets broadcast images of police taking Emery outside one of his stores in the city’s Plateau neighbourhood. Social media accounts listed as belonging to Jodie Emery said her husband was among those who were arrested.

Cannabis Culture, the brand owned by the Emerys, already has a dozen shops across Canada.

On Friday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau told reporters in Montreal “until we’ve changed the law, the current laws exist and apply.”

Ottawa is moving “properly and responsibly,” to legalize marijuana, Trudeau said, but the current law governing cannabis will stand until new legislation is ratified.

Coderre reiterated that message on Saturday, saying that marijuana advocates need to be patient and respect the law until it is changed.

“Police did their jobs, as they should, and we have to send a message to the community that this is not the right way to do (civil) disobedience,” he said.

http://ipolitics.ca/2016/12/17.....boutiques/
Bugs





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PostPosted: Sun Dec 18, 2016 12:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If the only question was the legalization of marijuana, it would be the easiest thing to do. Just stop arresting people. Let them open up their little businesses, and let it go from there.

But that isn't what's happening here. All the problems have to do with cartelizing the business. And what goes hand-in-hand with that, the taxation.

As a business, the trade would generate incomes and be taxed like everything else. It would pay GST or whatever its initials now are. No, those aren't the taxes they're interested in. They want to put an extra tax, a "sin tax". But if they go too far, they will only maintain the black market. And how will they keep interlopers away from the big profits, now scheduled for some of those people who have 'bought access'...

There's not much wrong with marijuana when put in the scale against alcohol or tobacco. It can be abused, and people do. But laws are singularly ineffective at stopping abuse of legal substances.

There will be an increase in use, when legalized, in the sense that other groups of people will buy some once in a while. But these careful people are most likely disciplined enough to use it prudently.
RCO





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PostPosted: Sun Dec 18, 2016 12:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
If the only question was the legalization of marijuana, it would be the easiest thing to do. Just stop arresting people. Let them open up their little businesses, and let it go from there.

But that isn't what's happening here. All the problems have to do with cartelizing the business. And what goes hand-in-hand with that, the taxation.

As a business, the trade would generate incomes and be taxed like everything else. It would pay GST or whatever its initials now are. No, those aren't the taxes they're interested in. They want to put an extra tax, a "sin tax". But if they go too far, they will only maintain the black market. And how will they keep interlopers away from the big profits, now scheduled for some of those people who have 'bought access'...

There's not much wrong with marijuana when put in the scale against alcohol or tobacco. It can be abused, and people do. But laws are singularly ineffective at stopping abuse of legal substances.

There will be an increase in use, when legalized, in the sense that other groups of people will buy some once in a while. But these careful people are most likely disciplined enough to use it prudently.


its clear one of the main goals of the liberals proposal is taxation , there trying to sell the legalisation of marijuana as a "libertarian " thing to do , when in fact its actually the opposite , well they plan to legalise it , they also want to try and control it and tax it for the government , its a little bit of freedom but in exchange for more government involvement , so its really not about personal freedoms at all


I feel bizarre saying this but emery's proposed store in montreal wasn't even that unreasonable , an age limit of 19 and they'd still be paying sales tax on all purchases , and they'd be selling marijuana from a reliable source so no fear of contamination

the crazy guy who used to sell pot seeds might actually get wealthy if his chain of pot stores takes off , it seems he's less of an activist now and sees the financial potential here
Bugs





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PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2016 11:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Have you ever seen any Canadian government do anything to increase personal freedom in your life? When you hear them even talking about it, you should discreetly put your hand over your rectum just in case.

No, personal freedom is not a concept that's widely understood in Canada. Or appreciated.

This is about a very greedy government which has lied to get power, trying to tax everything in sight. They are virtually taxing the air, although they call it a 'carbon tax'. (One of the laughable bits of mathematics they do is "construct" the idea that 80 gallons of gasoline will weigh a ton when it's residues are in the air! And then they use that notion to scare people because the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere has risen from .0003 to .0004 -- that is, from three parts per 10,000, to four.)

It's hopeless in Canada, where the Conservatives have been stampeded into compromising with these unproven claims lest someone accuse them of having principles.

It's the same with marijuana. All that's at issue is how to keep government in control of a product that they can heavily tax. That's the only real issue. It isn't about health, it isn't about liberty, it's about government milking the people.

And they are only doing it so they can go more deeply in debt, and saddle our children with even more of a burden.
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Jan 04, 2017 10:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( there is a weird Marijuana related illness increasing in the states that have legalised it , its not fatal but does cause pain and doctors are having a hard time figuring it out )


Marijuana-related illness increases in legalized states

By De Elizabeth
·Published January 02, 2017



As various states move towards the legalization of marijuana, doctors are noticing the increase of a particular illness that is associated with regular use of the drug. Emergency rooms have been seeing an influx of patients with the same symptoms – severe abdominal pain and intense vomiting – and this increase is particularly high in certain states that have already legalized the use of marijuana.

While some doctors have been perplexed by these symptoms, the disease does have a name: cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome, or CHS. The illness is believed to be caused by regular and long-term use of marijuana.

There seems to be a direct correlation between CHS and states that have passed marijuana legalization measures. One study shows that CHS diagnoses nearly doubled at two of Colorado's hospitals since 2009 – the year that it was decided that Colorado needed a state-regulated medical marijuana distribution system.

CHS was first identified ten years ago, but there is still not much known about the illness. Dr. Kennon Heard explained, "The most likely cause is that people using marijuana frequently and in high doses have changes in the receptors in their body, and those receptors become dysregulated in some way, and it starts causing pain."


In terms of treatment, doctors have found that the symptoms of CHS are often relieved with hot showers and baths. The use of a hot bath can also serve as a diagnostic tool for doctors who are looking to identify a patient's illness. Additionally, patients are often given an IV of fluids to help reduce the vomiting. However, the only way to "cure" CHS is to severely reduce the intake of marijuana, or stop using altogether.

http://www.foxnews.com/health/.....tates.html
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Jan 04, 2017 2:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A quarter of Canadian pot users admit to driving while high

Government plans to use poll to set baseline to study effects of legalizing weed


Kyle Duggan

Wednesday, January 4th, 2017


More than a quarter of Canadians who have used marijuana say they’ve driven a vehicle while high, according to recently released EKOS polling research on marijuana done for Health Canada last summer.

That figure jumps to 42 per cent for recent pot users.



Over a third of survey respondents said they’ve been a passenger with someone driving while high. For young adults (aged 19-24), that figure jumps to 42 per cent, and rides as high as 70 per cent for recent marijuana users.

But fewer – about a tenth of respondents – said they would be likely to accept a ride from someone driving under the influence of marijuana. Another tenth said they would be “moderately likely.”

The combination online/telephone survey, quietly posted online near the end of December, was done in May and June, with a sample of 2,201 Canadians 13-years-old or older. It has a margin of error of plus or minus 2.1 percentage points 19 times out of 20.



Next to alcohol, cannabis is the most commonly detected substance on drivers arrested for impaired driving in Canada.

The chair for the government’s cannabis legalization task force, Anne McLellan, told reporters in December that setting regulations for drug-impaired driving was one of the most difficult issues the task force examined. While McLellan pointed out pot impaired driving is not a new problem, the final report warned about a “heightened anxiety that legalization may lead to increased dangers on the road” and suggested the government should hash out a national education campaign on impaired driving, along with looking into setting a THC limit.

The Liberal government is expected to introduce its marijuana legalization legislation this spring, a major drug policy change for the country that’s still lacking in details.

The federal Tories have criticized the policy, saying it’s causing confusion among Canadians over what’s legal. Illegal pot dispensaries have popped up over the past year, frustrating Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and leading to police arrests across the country, including one in Ottawa this week.

It also has Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister calling for a delay in implementation to prepare for legalization and design a public awareness campaign about pot-impaired driving.

The $81,416 EKOS poll was done to study in detail how Canadians view and use marijuana, and how much they know about it, ahead of legalizing recreational marijuana.

The wide-ranging survey also found some 41 per cent of Canadians see pot as a high health risk. That figure dropped to 27 per cent for young adults – 40 per cent of whom consider it a low risk.

The report says the survey research was designed to “establish a baseline for the general population aged 13+” allowing a starting point for monitoring how perceptions change as the government legalizes. The government has argued that legalizing and regulation marijuana sales will deter youth consumption.

It’s still not entirely clear how legalizing – in itself – affects youth use.

A recent study in the medical journal JAMA Pediatrics surveyed Grade 8 and 10 students in Colorado and Washington, where recreational pot has been legalized. In Washington, pot use went up and risk perceptions went down, while in Colorado they changed little. Researchers suggested that could be from varying levels of marijuana commercialization between the two states.

Another takeaway from the poll: about two-thirds of Canadians said they already have access to enough trustworthy information about marijuana’s health risks.

Seventy four per cent of parents said they already have enough access to trustworthy information on the topic. Recent users clocked in at 85 per cent. Sources they said they’d most likely consult first are health-care professionals (53 per cent), followed by “the internet” (15 per cent). For young adults and parents, “the internet” ranks at 23 per cent.

Strikingly, though, only 86 per cent know that pot is currently illegal for recreational use, and nearly a fifth of Canadians who have consumed pot told EKOS they don’t know what method, exactly, they use to consume their marijuana.

http://ipolitics.ca/2017/01/04.....hile-high/
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Legalize recreational marijuana: task force

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