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RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
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Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Thu Dec 15, 2016 6:33 pm    Post subject: Facebook to target so called " fake news " Reply with quote

( facebook is now going all out to target news stories its editors deem to be fake ? whatever that means )


Users can flag content shared on the social media platform that the AP deems untrue. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)



Associated Press partners with Facebook to flag 'fake news'




By Eddie Scarry (@eScarry) • 12/15/16 1:27 PM



The Associated Press announced Thursday it is partnering with Facebook to flag content shared on the social media platform that the AP deems untrue.

"AP has long done some of the most thorough fact-checking in the news business," Sally Buzbee, AP's incoming executive editor, said in a statement. "This initiative is a natural extension of that tradition, and of the AP's long-standing role setting the standards for accuracy and ethics in journalism."

The AP's announcement stated: "Now, when AP or another participating fact-check organization flags a piece of content as fake, Facebook users will see that it has been disputed and there will be a link to the corresponding article explaining why."

If a Facebook user decides to share the marked content, AP's mark will follow the content so that other users see it as well

http://www.washingtonexaminer......le/2609747
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 6276
Reputation: 229
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Thu Dec 15, 2016 6:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dec 15, 2016 03:53 PM ET


Facebook Declares War on Fake News


The world's largest social media company is going to make it a lot harder for fake stories to surface in your News Feed.


BY MOLLY FOSCO


Facebook is finally cracking down on their fake news problem. The world's most widely used social media platform will now be fact-checking news stories to verify their accuracy and will bury fake stories in the News Feed, the company announced Thursday.

The Book was widely criticized this year for their failure to suppress multiple fake news stories about Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton that rapidly spread on the platform during the presidential election. Many of these false reports, which were overwhelmingly pro-Trump or anti-Clinton, can be traced to a small town called Veles in Macedonia. Teenagers here were crafting sensational stories they knew would get the attention of Americans on Facebook and therefore bring in lots of money from advertisements.

To assist them in waging war on the deluge of fake stories that still surface on the platform everyday, Facebook is partnering with several media organizations including Snopes, Factcheck.org, ABC News and PolitiFact, which are all part of a fact-checking network called Poynters based in St. Petersburg, Fla.

RELATED: Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg Outlines Projects to Reduce Fake News

Soon, users will be able to report stories they suspect are fake. Once the story has been marked as false by fact-checkers, it will be demoted in the News Feed.

"We're testing several ways to make it easier to report a hoax if you see one on Facebook, which you can do by clicking the upper right hand corner of a post," Adam Mosseri, VP of News Feed said in the company's blog post. "We've relied heavily on our community for help on this issue, and this can help us detect more fake news."


Facebook

Facebook will still allow you to share fake news stories, but before you hit the Share button you'll see a notification that tells you the story's accuracy has been disputed by 3rd parties.


Facebook

There will also be a team of Facebook researchers reviewing website domains that appear to be fake, like "washingtonpost.co," and sending them to the Poynters' 3rd-party fact-checkers. Once a website has been labeled as a fake news organization, they will no longer be allowed to sell ads on the platform.

"On the buying side, we've eliminated the ability to spoof domains, which will reduce the prevalence of sites that pretend to be real publications," Mosseri said.

RELATED: Using Facebook May Help You Live Longer

The crackdown will likely come as a disappointment to the young people of Veles, who, in some cases, have been making thousands of euros a day from advertisements on their fake news sites, according to the BBC report. When asked if he worries these stories may have unfairly influenced the U.S. election, a young man who used to run a fake news site in Veles told the BBC, "Teenagers in our city don't care how Americans vote. They are only satisfied that they make money and can buy expensive clothes and drinks!"

Mosseri ended his post with a sentiment on the importance of authenticity to everyone who works at Facebook. "It's important to us that the stories you see on Facebook are authentic and meaningful," he said. "We're excited about this progress, but we know there's more to be done. We're going to keep working on this problem for as long as it takes to get it right."

http://www.seeker.com/facebook.....46827.html
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 6276
Reputation: 229
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Thu Dec 15, 2016 6:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Facebook will add warning labels to ‘fake news’


posted at 4:01 pm on December 15, 2016 by John Sexton



Facebook had announced it will begin adding warning labels to “fake news” on its site. The plan is to add a link to stories which readers have identified as fake. The link will cite fact-checkers explaining why a story is false or fake. Facebook described the proposed changes in a blog post:


We believe in giving people a voice and that we cannot become arbiters of truth ourselves, so we’re approaching this problem carefully. We’ve focused our efforts on the worst of the worst, on the clear hoaxes spread by spammers for their own gain, and on engaging both our community and third party organizations…

We’re testing several ways to make it easier to report a hoax if you see one on Facebook, which you can do by clicking the upper right hand corner of a post. We’ve relied heavily on our community for help on this issue, and this can help us detect more fake news.

We’ve started a program to work with third-party fact checking organizations that are signatories of Poynter’s International Fact Checking Code of Principles. We’ll use the reports from our community, along with other signals, to send stories to these organizations. If the fact checking organizations identify a story as fake, it will get flagged as disputed and there will be a link to the corresponding article explaining why. Stories that have been disputed may also appear lower in News Feed.

Cue the outrage mobs targeting stories or websites they don’t like as “fake news.” But Facebook users’ reporting of “fake news” will be backed up by the expertise of fact-checkers. Clicking over to Poynter’s list of signatories you find the fact-checkers Facebook will rely on in the U.S. are ABC News, the AP, FactCheck.org, the Washington Post, Snopes and Politifact.

There certainly is a lot of junk on Facebook that I wouldn’t defend and won’t miss. That said, the idea of Snopes and Politifact controlling the distribution of news online seems like a truly terrible idea. Just to take one significant example of why it’s a bad idea, here’s how Politifact rated Obama’s statements ‘If you like your plan you can keep it’ between 2008 and 2013.


There are a couple points to make about this sequence. The first is that it’s not just tinfoil hat conspiracy theories from fringe websites that are going to be impacted by Facebook’s decision to put a scarlet letter on certain news stories. It’s also major stories that are central to our political debate, like the one above. This was President Obama’s go-to sales line for his signature achievement in office.

The second point here is that fact-checkers get it wrong sometimes. Not only was “If you like your plan…” important to the national debate it was also hard to pin down because of the grand scope of the change being instituted. Obamacare was complex enough (and far off enough) that it was possible to argue Obama was right…until it became clear he wasn’t.

Third point: Sometimes the experts are also partisans who have an agenda. That was certainly the case with regard to Obamacare. Health care wonks like Ezra Klein and Jonathan Gruber knew a great deal about the program. They were also prepared to help their Democratic allies in government lie to the public if necessary to see it succeed. It’s not that they didn’t know the truth it’s just that they weren’t going to share all of it (except occasionally to a friendly audience).

Now imagine applying these new rules retroactively to this story. Would any story which challenged Obama’s statement be flagged as “fake news” prior to 2013? And not only flagged, it seems Facebook would discourage people from sharing it and some algorithm would ensure it appeared lower in the news rankings. The bottom line is that a “fake news” designation could suppress stories that later turn out to be true, possibly even for years. This is just one example but it’s a pivotal one.

Maybe Facebook will clear out a bunch of “fake news” with this new process but it’s also very likely going to taint and hamper some important (and true) news stories. Fact-checkers do miss the mark sometimes and experts aren’t always completely straight with the public. But what’s really worrisome is that this new dynamic creates fresh opportunity for unscrupulous politicians who are good at controversializing stories they want to go away. It also could help in the creation of media echo chambers designed to support certain policies. Has Facebook thought through any of this? It’s not clear that they have

http://hotair.com/archives/201.....fake-news/
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Facebook to target so called " fake news "

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