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RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Oct 19, 2016 7:15 am    Post subject: New Alberta poll pc's way ahead and support for merger Reply with quote

( as the pc's start a leadership race there support has surged across alberta , wildrose still in second place at 25 % but ndp 3rd at only 19% and behind in Calgary and even Edmonton )


Braid: Shocking poll shows huge backing for PCs and unity drive




Don Braid, Calgary Herald
More from Don Braid, Calgary Herald

Published on: October 18, 2016 | Last Updated: October 18, 2016 9:54 PM MDT



Suddenly, there’s a knockout political poll that turns conventional belief on its head.

This one has to make a certain Jason Kenney very happy. He should be.

The survey from the Citizen Society Research Lab at Lethbridge College shows the Progressive Conservatives ahead across Alberta — way, way ahead, with 38.4 per cent support of all voters.

This poll says the PCs are 13 points in front of Wildrose, which polls 25.7 per cent. The NDP is third at a dismal 19.7 per cent.

This will be a big jolt to Wildrose Leader Brian Jean, who was boasting Tuesday of his party’s continuing lead in earlier polls.


It will rattle the NDP, which was celebrating its third-quarter fundraising lead — $425,437 compared to $330,666 for Wildrose.

On the money side, the PCs were way back at $48,209.

But Kenney, a mere leadership candidate at this point, says his Unite Alberta fundraising arm collected $497,000 in the same period.

The guy with a pickup truck and a cause out-earned the government party, the official Opposition party and his own party.

It appears that Kenney is bringing popularity to the PC party even as he suctions cash away from it. At a certain point, the PCs may beg him to pull into the garage and take over.

The PCs are even leading in Edmonton, with 36.2 per cent of the vote, compared to 28.8 per cent for the New Democrats, in what’s supposed to be the government citadel.

The PCs also lead in every other part of the province, by wider margins. In Calgary, they’re at 42.4 per cent, compared to 17.2 per cent for the NDP.

Alberta politics poll graphic

Faron Ellis, who leads the poll, agrees that this trend is pushed both by “residual loyalty” and a widespread desire to unite the conservative side of Alberta politics.

The support shows that 66.2 per cent of Alberta residents — all Albertans, not just conservatives — support some kind of merger between the PC and Wildrose parties.

That, of course, is exactly what PC candidate Kenney wants to do.

Nearly everyone agrees by now that he’s the leader of the unity movement. He has managed to identify himself with both the merger effort and the PC party itself.

As of Tuesday, Kenney is also the only official PC leadership candidate, having been approved by both the party and Elections Alberta after coughing up his $30,000 deposit and meeting other criteria.

Jean really started the unity talk, then let it slide when some of his members balked and the PCs rejected his overtures.

Ever since he’s been waiting in the bushes for conservatives to come to Wildrose.

Now, Kenney and the PCs might be surging right past him. If Kenney wins the leadership, he’d hold the hammer in merger talks.

Jean could quickly face discontent over his leadership. The Wildrose convention set for Red Deer on Oct. 28-29 might be very interesting.

In earlier polls, Wildrose had been drifting along in the lead without breaking into majority territory. The PCs and NDP traded second and third place in the mid-20 per cent range.

Now the PCs have broken out of the pack. That’s an almost impossible feat for a party that lost the previous election, elected only nine MLAs, and now has a temporary leader who disagrees with his own party’s campaign rules,

Other factors are surely at play — nostalgia for the old government, for one — but the prime mover can only be that huge provincial backing for Kenney’s unity drive.

This poll is so unexpected that many people will question it. Even those who accept the numbers will dispute what they mean. Other PC leadership candidates will say it only proves people want the old party back.

But there are really two polls here: the voting one and the money one. Jason Kenney and his movement appear to be leading both. That’s impossible for any party to ignore.

Don Braid’s column appear regularly in the Herald

http://calgaryherald.com/news/.....nity-drive
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Oct 19, 2016 8:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

New poll shows Alberta PCs leading Wildrose by almost 13 points, NDP in third




James Wood, Calgary Herald
More from James Wood, Calgary Herald

Published on: October 18, 2016 | Last Updated: October 18, 2016 9:59 PM MDT



A surprising new poll shows the Progressive Conservatives with a significant lead among Alberta voters, while the governing NDP has plunged to third place.

The survey from the Citizen Society Research Lab at Lethbridge College also shows two-thirds of Albertans support a merger of PC and Wildrose parties in time to fight the next election in 2019.

The live-caller telephone survey of 1,513 adult Albertans, conducted from Oct. 1 to 8, puts the Tories ahead with 38.4 per cent support among decided voters, with the Wildrose at 25.7 per cent and the NDP at 19.7 per cent.

The Liberals have 9.4 per cent support, while the Alberta Party comes in at 3.5 per cent.

Alberta politics poll graphic



Faron Ellis, the Lethbridge College political scientist who supervised the poll, believes the PC party’s leadership race and the high-profile candidacy of unite-the-right advocate Jason Kenney is partly behind the Tories’ increased appeal.

He noted there is also considerable “residual loyalty” for the PCs — who governed Alberta for more than four decades before being swept from office by the NDP in last year’s provincial election — and centrist voters disillusioned with the Notley government may be returning to the fold.

Faron Ellis teaches political science and history at Lethbridge College where he also directs the activities of the Citizen Society Research Lab.

Faron Ellis teaches political science and history at Lethbridge College where he also directs the activities of the Citizen Society Research Lab.

“As long as a party has a relatively positive image, a leadership contest tends to increase voter support for them,” Ellis said in an interview this week.

“Added to that, is the desire to have — the substantial desire to have — a united option.”

The poll shows 66.2 per cent support for unifying the PCs and Wildrose into a single party ahead of the next election. The idea is equally popular among each party’s supporters at about 80 per cent backing from both PC and Wildrose supporters.

“A good chunk of Albertans are looking for that united option,” said Ellis.

He said the poll is good news for Kenney, the former Conservative MP who is campaigning for the Tory leadership on a platform of merging the PCs with the Wildrose. The other declared contestants so far in the leadership race, Donna Kennedy-Glans, Byron Nelson, Sandra Jansen and Richard Starke, have opposed the merger proposal.

Wildrose Leader Brian Jean, speaking to the Rotary Club of Calgary Tuesday, said he is in favour of consolidating conservatives but that over the last decade he’s seen little “that would suggest the PCs are actually conservative.”

Ellis said the poll is less favourable for Wildrose, which remains at basically the same level it was in polling he conducted a year ago.

“Wildrose has had its opportunity and not capitalized, I guess would be the most charitable way to put it,” he said.

The survey is even worse for the NDP, which in October 2015 led the Citizens Society Research Lab poll with 31.1 per cent support among decided voters, the Tories at 28.7 per cent and Wildrose at 26.3 per cent.

Premier Rachel Notley has faced difficult economic times since taking office and may be pursuing a strategy of making its toughest decisions — such as hiking taxes on corporations and high-income earners — early in the government’s mandate, said Ellis.

But the government will still face the fallout from actions such as its broad-based carbon tax, which doesn’t come into effect until Jan. 1, he said.

“You never know, two years is an eternity in politics … but right now they’re trending in the wrong direction — and rapidly,” said Ellis.

The poll shows the PCs ahead in all regions of the province: Calgary, Edmonton and the north and south areas outside of the two main cities. They also lead among both men and women, and across income levels, education levels and age groups.

In Calgary, the Tories are in the lead with 41.4 per cent support, followed by the Wildrose at 26.2 per cent and the NDP at 17.2 per cent. In the capital region, the NDP is in second with 28.8 per cent support, compared to the PCs’ 36.2 per cent. The Wildrose has 18.4 per cent support in the Edmonton area.

The poll has a margin of error of 2.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

http://calgaryherald.com/news/.....p-in-third
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Oct 19, 2016 12:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm left wondering are we at the point where the alberta ndp realise there not ever going to get back in ? there not even leading in Edmonton in this poll . with these numbers they'd be lucky to hold onto some core seats in Edmonton and maybe a few others here and there ( could get wiped out in Calgary a city that normally doesn't elect ndp mla's ) but be reduced to opposition or 3rd party in legislature .

but I also somehow suspect the next election is a long time away and might even be delayed until last or latest legal date it could be held which might be 3 or 4 years away ( seem to recall reading that Bob rae delayed Ontario election as long is he could in 90's , cause they won in 1990 but next vote wasn't till 1995 ) ? perhaps there hoping time will improve the dismal economic situation ? or other factors will help them but its certainty looking like a 1 term ndp government like Ontario and Nova Scotia both had , with slim chance of repeating strong performance of there first election .
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Oct 19, 2016 4:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( notley delivered a state of the province address , was mentioned somewhere else debt was now at around $30 billion and a lot being spent on interest as well , can't find exact figures yet )


Notley delivers State of the Province address


Brad Wisker

October 19, 2016 12:27 pm
Notley delivers State of the Province address

Premier Rachel Notley delivered her annual State of the Province address in Calgary earlier today.

Her speech focused on the diversification of the province’s energy economy and continued investment in health care and education.


Notley started her speech on a sombre note, addressing the sudden passing of former premier Jim Prentice last week.

“My family knows the pain the Prentice family and the families of other crash victims are going through,” Notley said, in an apparent reference to her father, who also died in a plane crash.

Notley also spoke highly about advice and support Prentice provided in her transition to becoming premier following the last provincial election, his relationship with indigenous people across the country, and his expansion of Canada’s national parks system.

Notley spoke at length about the impact the price of oil has had on Albertans and a need to diversify the economy and the types of energy the province produces.

“Being so heavily dependent on one product, sold at one price, to one market – – leaves us far too vulnerable to the ups and downs of an international oil market over which we have exactly zero control.”

Last February the province announced a $500-million incentives program for would-be petrochemical facilities in Alberta’s industrial heartland. The idea was to offset Alberta’s high construction costs by offering royalty credits for petrochemical plant operators.

She stood by her decision to introduce provincial carbon taxes, a move which takes effect Jan. 1, only days after a federal decision on pricing carbon is expected.

She said her government would be “spelling out a framework” for a conversion from a coal-dependant system to a cleaner power production model this fall.

Notley also spoke of the importance of securing new overseas trading partners for Alberta and getting access to tidewater. She suggested she is waiting on decisions around pipelines from the federal government.

Notley said her government is managing the province’s economic losses without cutbacks to public services like health care and education.

She spoke highly about the government’s agreement last week with the Alberta Medical Association to hold spending increases to about two per cent through 2018.

She also suggested that Albertans’ access to good education “is arguably the single most important investment the government of Alberta cane make in the cause of building a better, more diversified, more value-added and more resilient economy.”

Earlier Wednesday, the NDP announced an extension to Alberta’s tuition freeze until the fall of 2018. The freeze started in 2015.

Notley said provincial revenues have dropped by almost 15 per cent.

While she suggested the government could act as a “shock absorber” for a time, she also noted that the provincial budget would have to eventually come back into balance.

Notley also suggested her government’s increases to borrowing limits will support employment and growth.

She promised legislation would be coming soon to support tax credits that would help entrepreneurs and small and medium-sized businesses get access to capital.

She stood by her decision to increase Alberta’s minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2018, “so that better times will be widely shared, and no one will be left behind.” The move has been highly criticized by some Alberta business owners. (with files from Global News/bw)

http://www.newstalk770.com/syn.....s-province
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Oct 21, 2016 8:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( massive opposition to the ndp's carbon tax may be bring support for the ndp down , this poll has opposition at 67 % , with 52 % strongly opposed )


Albertans give NDP carbon tax thumbs down in new poll

James Wood, Calgary Herald
More from James Wood, Calgary Herald

Published on: October 20, 2016 | Last Updated: October 20, 2016 8:30 PM MDT


The Notley government announced details of a carbon tax as part of Alberta's policy on climate change on Sunday.

The Notley government announced details of a carbon tax as part of Alberta's policy on climate change on Sunday. Calgary Herald



A new poll shows two-thirds of Albertans oppose the NDP government’s new broad-based carbon tax but narrowly support its plan to quickly phase out coal-fired power.

The survey by Lethbridge College’s Citizen Society Research Lab shows opposition among Albertans to the carbon tax, which comes into effect on Jan. 1, at 67.2 per cent. A majority of poll respondents — 52.5 per cent — consider themselves strongly opposed.

The tax, which is aimed at lowering Alberta’s Canada-leading greenhouse gas emissions and helping to win support nationally for new pipeline projects, has 32.8 per cent support.

Faron Ellis, the Lethbridge College political scientist who oversees the poll, said the NDP government is taking a political risk as the tax is already prompting a negative reaction before Albertans start paying.

“History is not on the side of the government,” he said. “Taxes tend to be more popular before they’re implemented.

“We’re into uncharted territory.”

Ellis acknowledged an unknown factor in how the carbon tax will be received is the NDP government’s plan to issue rebates to a majority of Alberta households. The economy-wide tax — based on the equivalent of $20 per tonne of CO2 emissions in its first year — will add 4.5 cents to the price of a litre of gasoline and 5.35 cents for diesel, while the cost of natural gas will rise by more than $1 per gigajoule.

The government says the average family with two children will pay an additional $433 in direct and indirect costs in the first year. However, the government has vowed to provide rebates ranging from $100 to $360 to low and middle-income households to offset the levy. Two-thirds of provincial households will receive at least a partial rebate.

“I see what the government’s thinking: ‘You won’t notice it that much on your monthly bills and … the gas (price), these things fluctuate regularly, and if you’re receiving a rebate, you’ll maybe get used to it and it’s going to save the planet, so rah rah,'” said Ellis.

The tax and rebates are slated to increase in 2018 based on an emission price of $30 a tonne, while the federal government has said it will require provinces to implement a carbon pricing mechanism that year that will rise to $50 a tonne in 2022.

The carbon tax is part of a suite of policies the NDP government says will lower projected emissions growth by 50 megatonnes by 2030, stabilizing Alberta’s greenhouse gas production at current levels. The climate strategy also includes a plan to end the use of coal-fired power in the province by 2030.

The Lethbridge College poll shows that 52.5 per cent of Albertans support the accelerated coal phase-out, compared to 47.5 per cent who are opposed.

Ellis noted the potential impact of the coal plan on Albertans is yet to be determined.

Alberta Premier Rachel Notley delivers the State of the Province address in Calgary on Wednesday.

Alberta Premier Rachel Notley delivers the State of the Province address in Calgary on Wednesday. Leah Hennel / Leah Hennel/Postmedia

In her state-of-the-province address Wednesday in Calgary, Premier Rachel Notley made it clear the government won’t blink on its climate policies.

She noted that 60 per cent of the province’s power currently comes from coal.

“Our province is by far the biggest coal pollution emitter in Canada,” said Notley. “That is going to end.”

Details of the government’s plan, including compensation for companies that own six plants that would have continued operating past 2030 without the phase-out, will be released in the fall.

Notley also has repeatedly rebuffed calls for the government to either scrap or delay the carbon tax.

“We are going to price carbon, exactly as most credible economists — many of them conservative — argue will create the right incentives to reduce emissions at the least economic cost,” the premier said in her speech.

But the climate plan has come under heavy fire from opposition parties in Alberta.

Wildrose Leader Brian Jean told a Calgary Rotary Club audience this week that both the carbon tax and the coal phase-out should be killed.

“It takes too much money out of the pockets of families, families that need that money for themselves,” he said.

http://calgaryherald.com/news/.....n-new-poll
Bugs





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PostPosted: Fri Oct 21, 2016 8:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:
I'm left wondering are we at the point where the alberta ndp realise there not ever going to get back in ? there not even leading in Edmonton in this poll . with these numbers they'd be lucky to hold onto some core seats in Edmonton and maybe a few others here and there ( could get wiped out in Calgary a city that normally doesn't elect ndp mla's ) but be reduced to opposition or 3rd party in legislature .

but I also somehow suspect the next election is a long time away and might even be delayed until last or latest legal date it could be held which might be 3 or 4 years away ( seem to recall reading that Bob rae delayed Ontario election as long is he could in 90's , cause they won in 1990 but next vote wasn't till 1995 ) ? perhaps there hoping time will improve the dismal economic situation ? or other factors will help them but its certainty looking like a 1 term ndp government like Ontario and Nova Scotia both had , with slim chance of repeating strong performance of there first election .


When parties know they are certain to lose the next election, they can be very dangerous in their desperation, and double'-down on the problematic policies.

The NDP got in because of a split in the PC vote, aided by an effective leader and the Mulcair surge. I suspect they have known this from the start, and only hoped there was an undiscovered constituency for their plans. It hasn't worked out that way. But now, there will be a tendency to implement more new policies because this may be their last chance.
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Oct 21, 2016 3:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
RCO wrote:
I'm left wondering are we at the point where the alberta ndp realise there not ever going to get back in ? there not even leading in Edmonton in this poll . with these numbers they'd be lucky to hold onto some core seats in Edmonton and maybe a few others here and there ( could get wiped out in Calgary a city that normally doesn't elect ndp mla's ) but be reduced to opposition or 3rd party in legislature .

but I also somehow suspect the next election is a long time away and might even be delayed until last or latest legal date it could be held which might be 3 or 4 years away ( seem to recall reading that Bob rae delayed Ontario election as long is he could in 90's , cause they won in 1990 but next vote wasn't till 1995 ) ? perhaps there hoping time will improve the dismal economic situation ? or other factors will help them but its certainty looking like a 1 term ndp government like Ontario and Nova Scotia both had , with slim chance of repeating strong performance of there first election .


When parties know they are certain to lose the next election, they can be very dangerous in their desperation, and double'-down on the problematic policies.

The NDP got in because of a split in the PC vote, aided by an effective leader and the Mulcair surge. I suspect they have known this from the start, and only hoped there was an undiscovered constituency for their plans. It hasn't worked out that way. But now, there will be a tendency to implement more new policies because this may be their last chance.


I really do wonder where the alberta ndp are headed . polling is only one indicator of political support , they are claiming to have raised more money than other parties . but it does appear they are in trouble and really don't have a strong base of support historically in the province

the question is will they keep trying to win over swing suburban voters in Edmonton and Calgary or go into some sort of lefty /ndp activist agenda . and try and implement ndp policy on the province even if there is little or no interest for it
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 21, 2016 4:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The leadership on the right in Alberta has been suspect since Ed Stelmach back in 2006.
The PCs lost touch with their grassroots and the Wildrose Party destroyed any sort of public trust with the Danielle Smith boondoggle.

Why elect a party that can't even keep itself together?

Yet till 2015 Alberta still largely lined up behind the PCs till finally it was enough.

Jason Kenney is basically passing up on the leadership of the CPC in order to fix the issues with the parties on the right in Alberta and the voters in Alberta are clearly in favor of that.
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Nov 01, 2016 12:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( an interesting quote in this article , it says an ndp insider confirms the ndp have given up any hope of being re-elected in alberta and just trying to make as many irreversible changes to the province before they get tossed out , )


Gunter: Alberta Wildrose party seems to have hit a glass ceiling


lorne gunter
By Lorne Gunter , Edmonton Sun
First posted: Monday, October 31, 2016 05:43 PM MDT | Updated: Monday, October 31, 2016 06:02 PM MDT

Brian Jean
Wildrose leader Brian Jean speaks at the AUMA convention on Friday, October 7, 2016 in Edmonton. Greg Southam / Postmedia

If the provincial NDP are so unpopular – and they are – how come the Wildrose party isn’t 25 or 30 (or more) points ahead in the polls? And does the recent upsurge in support for the Tories really mean Alberta voters have forgiven the party of Alison Redford for its scandals and sense of entitlement? Or is something or someone else behind the numbers?

As the fall sitting of the Alberta legislature gets underway, just what is the state of provincial politics?

As odd as it may sound, the government of NDP Premier Rachel Notley was probably the big loser in last week’s federal byelection in Medicine Hat.

I know, the provincial NDP weren’t even running. It was a federal vote.

The race featured a snap visit by Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau. The federal NDP are headed by a lame-duck leader. And Notley’s federal cousins are split over whether to adopt the ultra-left Leap Manifesto.

But even if you lump all those excuses together, they don’t fully explain why the NDP went from 10% support in the 2015 general election, to 1% a year later.

The byelection vote should also be viewed as a referendum on the provincial NDP’s first 18 months in office and on its economic, environmental and fiscal policies. And voters don’t like them, not one little bit.

Alberta Legislature Speaker Bob Wanner, a New Democrat, won the Medicine Hat riding in the last provincial election, but you have to think that was a one-off protest vote and nothing else.

Yet, if the NDP are so unpopular (they have lost more than half of their support from last year’s general election), how come the official opposition Wildrose party is only six points ahead (26% to 20%)? How come the leaderless PCs are in first place at 38%?

Wildrose held their annual meeting in Red Deer over the weekend and, officially, there was talk everywhere of the party forming government following the 2019 election.

But a party at just 26% can’t claim to be on a path to power, especially if it can attract only that much support against an unpopular governing party.

Wildrose seems to have hit a glass ceiling. As much as I like Leader Brian Jean and admire him for bringing Wildrose back from the brink of disintegration after the mass defections to the Tories before the last election, I don’t think he has the charisma to unite right-of-centre voters on his own.

An NDP insider confided in me over the weekend, while Wildrose delegates gathered in a central Alberta hotel, that the Notley party has all but given up hope of being re-elected and are just trying to make as many irreversible changes as they can to Alberta before they are removed in two-and-a-half years.

However, they hold out one slim hope: that the right fails to unify and they win a close campaign based on vote splitting.

Which, finally, brings us to the Tories.

Under Redford, the Tories were NDP-lite – big-spending social engineers who disliked who and what Albertans are.

A lot of the Tories who remain in the party’s legislature caucus and in the party apparatus think the recent polls show that the party – the Redford party – is what Albertans truly want again – NDP spending and about half the environmentalism, minus all the socialist rhetoric.

But the Tories’ recent poll success is due to one thing only: Jason Kenney, the former federal cabinet minister who is seeking the provincial Tory leadership so he can work on a merger with Wildrose and make sure the NDP are one-term wonders.

That state of provincial politics will remain an acrimonious bog in which all three parties are stuck, unless and until the right can unite.

http://www.edmontonsun.com/201.....s-ceiling#
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2016 8:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( another new poll has come out with somewhat different numbers provincially in alberta )


New Alberta poll shows tight popularity race between NDP and Wildrose Party

James Wood, Calgary Herald
More from James Wood, Calgary Herald

Published on: November 30, 2016 | Last Updated: November 30, 2016 6:03 AM MST



The Wildrose and NDP are neck-and-neck more than two years ahead of the next provincial election in 2019, according to a new poll.

The ThinkHQ Public Affairs survey shows the Wildrose with 35 per cent support among leaning and decided voters if the election was held today, while the NDP comes in at 31 per cent.

The Progressive Conservatives are in third place with the backing of 24 per cent of those surveyed.

The Liberals and the Alberta Party are far behind, at four and three per cent support respectively.

ThinkHQ’s Marc Henry said that while the NDP suffered a drop in support since its election in May of 2015, polling numbers have remained relatively stable over the past year.

“I suspect as we get closer to the election, we’ll see a great deal of volatility, to be honest,” he said in an interview Tuesday.

Henry noted there are a number of factors in Alberta politics that remain unsettled, such as the push and pull over uniting the Wildrose and PCs into one party.

The poll was conducted from Nov. 15 to 20 through online interviews of a panel of 1,106 Albertans. Undecided respondents totalled 21 per cent.

The poll stands in contrast to another recent survey conducted by Lethbridge College’s Citizen Society Research Lab in October, which put the PCs in first at 38.4 per cent support, followed by the Wildrose at 25.7 per cent and the NDP at 19.7 per cent support.

But Henry said he’s confident in his work. He noted that the NDP retains significant support among younger voters and have established themselves as the provincial alternative for progressive voters.

“They’re government, for one thing. So you have a lot of people who have voted progressively, voted either NDP or voted Liberal over the years . . . they do have that sort of left-of-centre vote largely captured,” he said, noting a significant question is whether the NDP can win back the supporters it lost since the last election.

The poll shows a particularly tight race in Calgary, where the NDP at 31 per cent are narrowly ahead of the Wildrose and Tories, who are tied at 29 per cent. Rachel Notley’s New Democrats are significantly ahead in Edmonton, where the party holds every seat, sitting at 42 per cent compared with the Wildrose’s 27 per cent and the PCs’ 21 per cent.

The Wildrose has a double-digit lead in every other region of the province.

Online polls do not have a margin of error because the sample is not random, but a probability sample of this size would yield a margin of error of plus or minus three percentage points at a 95 per cent confidence interval.


http://calgaryherald.com/news/.....tight-race
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New Alberta poll pc's way ahead and support for merger

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