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RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2016 8:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( a liberal mpp hasn't even been in the legislature for months and was recently moved to a nursing home but still refuses to give up his seat at queens park cause it would trigger a by-election in a weak liberal riding ( York Centre ) that could be won by the pc's , I wish monte kwinter the best but its time to retire if you can't even make it to work )


MPP absence not unprecedented


christina-blizzard
By Christina Blizzard, Queen's Park Columnist
First posted: Monday, October 17, 2016 07:52 PM EDT | Updated: Monday, October 17, 2016 07:58 PM EDT


TORONTO - The issue of MPP attendance in the legislature is one that’s handled with great delicacy.

There are no reliable mechanisms by which to track whether an MPP was in the house on a particular day. You can only track whether he or she voted on a certain bill.

Since MPPs are elected by the voters in their riding and not hired by their political bosses, it’s difficult for the party leader to dictate when it’s time for someone to quit — although Premier Kathleen Wynne leaned on MPPs Kim Craitor and Bas Balkissoon to resign recently under somewhat ambiguous circumstances.

While I often like to poke sticks in the eyes of politicians, I have great respect for people who dedicate their lives to public service.

Many of them quietly serve their constituents loyally and faithfully for many years, so I’m sensitive to the fact that when they get sick, they may need a little extra consideration.

York Centre MPP Monte Kwinter, 85, is one of the province’s longest-serving MPPs. He’s been absent from the legislature for some time and recently moved to a nursing home.

First elected in 1985, he served his riding honourably and tirelessly for more than 30 years.

In an email to me Monday, a Wynne spokesman confirmed Kwinter is in a nursing home and said his constituency office is working for the people in his riding.

“Mr. Kwinter is currently recovering from an illness at Kensington Place. He is doing a lot better but still has mobility issues,” Jenn Beaudry said.

Kwinter is attending community events, she added. “Starting on Friday, he has meetings scheduled with constituents. We look forward to having him back soon.”

Kwinter’s absence is not unprecedented, of course.

Former Liberal cabinet minister Laurel Broten took several months off from her cabinet position for maternity leave and had a Liberal backbencher handle question period when she was environment minister.

Hamilton MPP Dominic Agostino ran in the 2003 election, even though he was suffering from liver cancer. He was absent from the legislature for several months and died in 2004.

On the lighter side, Brantford Tory Ron Johnson became a bit of a joke in 1996. He didn’t make it to Mike Harris’s cabinet, then failed to show up at Queen’s Park for months on end.

There are no provisions in the rules at Queen’s Park to declare a seat vacant if someone can’t or won’t show up.

The last time it was done was in the case of Adam Crooks, who in 1884 was institutionalized with an “incurable mental condition.”

From time to time, MPPs are forced from the legislature due to illness. In the private sector, you go on long-term disability. You can’t do that as a politician because as long as you’re elected, you and only you can answer to your constituents.

Still, we should be sensitive to the possibility that Kwinter may choose not to return to the rigours of political life — thus triggering yet another byelection.

And the Liberals would likely not want to fight one in a riding that until recently was held federally by Conservative Mark Adler and is close to former federal finance minister Joe Oliver’s home turf. It’s not so much a Liberal stronghold as it is a Monte Kwinter fief.

He’s represented it for three decades.

If they lose another two or three byelections, the Liberals are getting perilously close to minority territory.

But what’s important is that we wish Kwinter well, and hope he’s back at his seat soon.

http://www.torontosun.com/2016.....recedented
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2016 8:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oct 12, 2016 | Vote 0 0

Milton councillor to seek local PC Party nomination


Milton Canadian Champion
By Melanie Hennessey


Milton Councillor Mike Cluett is planning to switch gears politically.

The local and regional politician announced last night (October 11) that he will be seeking nomination for the Progressive Conservative Party to represent Miltonians at Queen's Park instead of Town Hall.

In an online statement, Cluett said that he made the decision after speaking with family, friends, colleagues and members of the Milton PC Riding Association.

“My family and I have called Milton our home for close to 14 years and we have seen many changes in our community,” he said. “The Province of Ontario has deemed Milton to be one of the 'Places to Grow' and we have seen many years of intensive growth with many more to come. It seems that all roads are leading to Milton, but the roadblocks to creating a complete community begin at Queen's Park.”

He added that it “feels like the Province has left us behind” on a variety of matters, such as the need for more schools in Milton, a solution to parking issues at the GO station and “inaction” on the Wildfrid Laurier University campus plans for Milton, which requires provincial approval.

“Over the coming days and weeks, I will outline a number of the concerns I have heard from Miltonians and PC party members,” he said.

Cluett has served as a local and regional councillor for Milton since 2010.

A date has yet to be set for a PC Party nomination meeting, but Cluett said it's expected to be soon.

Currently Milton is represented by Liberal MPP Indira Naidoo-Harris, who was recently named as associate minister of education overseeing early years and child care.

The next provincial election is slated for October 2018.


http://www.insidehalton.com/ne.....omination/
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2016 8:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

21 hours ago | Vote 0 0

John Himanen joins Ontario PC nomination race for Markham-Stouffville

Himanen competing with Calandra and Wassef for riding nomination


John Himanen announced Oct. 12 that he would seek the Ontario PC nomination for Markham-Stouffville.



Stouffville Sun-Tribune
By Ali Raza


Markham-Stouffville has a third potential candidate seeking the Ontario PC Party nomination for the riding.

John Himanen announced on Oct. 12 that he will seek the nomination for the upcoming provincial general election in 2018.

His announcement comes just weeks after former MP Paul Calandra and local pharmacist Farid Wassef announced their bid to gain the nomination.

“I have been speaking with friends, neighbours, residents, community groups, and PC Party members from our local riding association throughout the summer and have heard consistently that they are unhappy with our representation at Queen’s Park,” Himanen said in a press release.

“I have personally felt this frustration when I had a recent meeting request denied by our local MPP. I am running to be the representative for all residents of Markham-Stouffville, and above all, making a difference,” his statement reads.

Himanen is a longtime community activist and parental rights advocate, having lobbied for stronger Internet filters at York Region schools.

The new candidate is holding a community “meet and greet” on Saturday, Oct. 22 from 2 to 3 p.m. in the second-floor conference room at the Cornell Community Centre Library, 3201 Bur Oak Ave. in Markham. All residents of the riding of Markham-Stouffville are invited to attend.

For more information, visit www.votejohnh.com.

http://www.yorkregion.com/news.....ouffville/
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2016 11:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

There is something to be said about the OLP getting close to the Minority Government Line;
They need 54 Seats to maintain a majority and have 57 seats with two vacancies;

I would imagine the Tories will retain Niagara West—Glanbrook,
And lets assuming in a highly unlikely situation the OLP loses Ottawa—Vanier they are holding a majority with three seats

I would imagine that OLP MPPs have marching orders to stay on till the two By-election at a minimum.
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2016 2:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
There is something to be said about the OLP getting close to the Minority Government Line;
They need 54 Seats to maintain a majority and have 57 seats with two vacancies;

I would imagine the Tories will retain Niagara West—Glanbrook,
And lets assuming in a highly unlikely situation the OLP loses Ottawa—Vanier they are holding a majority with three seats

I would imagine that OLP MPPs have marching orders to stay on till the two By-election at a minimum.


but with Kwinter never there and possibly not well enough to return there only at 56 seats in reality . and I seem to recall reading about another liberal mpp with health issues as well who may not be there as much .

although its highly unlikely the opposition would want an early election even if they reached a point where they could trigger one , the ndp isn't positioned to do well and might have a hard time holding onto some of the seats they have gained in past years . there isn't the kind of ndp momentum there was in 2011 election although the provincial party is more popular than federal ndp
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2016 2:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:
cosmostein wrote:
There is something to be said about the OLP getting close to the Minority Government Line;
They need 54 Seats to maintain a majority and have 57 seats with two vacancies;

I would imagine the Tories will retain Niagara West—Glanbrook,
And lets assuming in a highly unlikely situation the OLP loses Ottawa—Vanier they are holding a majority with three seats

I would imagine that OLP MPPs have marching orders to stay on till the two By-election at a minimum.


but with Kwinter never there and possibly not well enough to return there only at 56 seats in reality . and I seem to recall reading about another liberal mpp with health issues as well who may not be there as much .

although its highly unlikely the opposition would want an early election even if they reached a point where they could trigger one , the ndp isn't positioned to do well and might have a hard time holding onto some of the seats they have gained in past years . there isn't the kind of ndp momentum there was in 2011 election although the provincial party is more popular than federal ndp


The NDP isnt too far off where they were in 2014 and whats more important is that 416 ridings that usually wouldn't come into play for the NDP become a factor as PC support which was terrible in 2014 will be slightly improved at the expense of the OLP;

The PCs will third in a lot of ridings but with more support than they received previously.

I would imagine the NDP would easily add Beaches—East York, Davenport, maybe even York South—Weston would swing back to the NDP even if their candidates got matching support from 2014.

The Tories and the NDP will be aiming for two very different things in the event of an election being called;

The NDPs path to forming a majority is unlikely;
They lack the support in the 905 belt, Midwestern Ontario, Eastern Ontario, and Central Ontario to win.

However an election which increase their seat total and sees a Liberal Minority allows for them to do exactly what they did after the 2011 election and shake down the Liberals for stuff to assist in passing budgets.

I also couldn't see either party be willing to prop up the Wynne Liberals on any confidence legislation as it would be used as a club in the next Election.
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2016 4:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
RCO wrote:
cosmostein wrote:
There is something to be said about the OLP getting close to the Minority Government Line;
They need 54 Seats to maintain a majority and have 57 seats with two vacancies;

I would imagine the Tories will retain Niagara West—Glanbrook,
And lets assuming in a highly unlikely situation the OLP loses Ottawa—Vanier they are holding a majority with three seats

I would imagine that OLP MPPs have marching orders to stay on till the two By-election at a minimum.


but with Kwinter never there and possibly not well enough to return there only at 56 seats in reality . and I seem to recall reading about another liberal mpp with health issues as well who may not be there as much .

although its highly unlikely the opposition would want an early election even if they reached a point where they could trigger one , the ndp isn't positioned to do well and might have a hard time holding onto some of the seats they have gained in past years . there isn't the kind of ndp momentum there was in 2011 election although the provincial party is more popular than federal ndp


The NDP isnt too far off where they were in 2014 and whats more important is that 416 ridings that usually wouldn't come into play for the NDP become a factor as PC support which was terrible in 2014 will be slightly improved at the expense of the OLP;

The PCs will third in a lot of ridings but with more support than they received previously.

I would imagine the NDP would easily add Beaches—East York, Davenport, maybe even York South—Weston would swing back to the NDP even if their candidates got matching support from 2014.

The Tories and the NDP will be aiming for two very different things in the event of an election being called;

The NDPs path to forming a majority is unlikely;
They lack the support in the 905 belt, Midwestern Ontario, Eastern Ontario, and Central Ontario to win.

However an election which increase their seat total and sees a Liberal Minority allows for them to do exactly what they did after the 2011 election and shake down the Liberals for stuff to assist in passing budgets.

I also couldn't see either party be willing to prop up the Wynne Liberals on any confidence legislation as it would be used as a club in the next Election.


the ndp are still polling reasonably well compared to how the federal ndp are doing in Ontario rate now , just don't have the same momentum as other years when they won a bunch of by-elections and had the federal surge benefit them in 2011 somewhat . they lost the Sudbury riding in a by-election and haven't done much since , although still did ok in the ridings the pc's won , almost tied liberals in scarborough rogue river

just don't see either parties wanting an early election ? seem too risky when they know wynne is going to call one in early 2018 ? anyways , why risk annoying the voters by forcing an early one . I just don't see the benefit unless a massive scandal grips wynne's government but has already been many and is still people saying there going to continue voting for her
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2016 4:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:

just don't see either parties wanting an early election ? seem too risky when they know wynne is going to call one in early 2018 ? anyways , why risk annoying the voters by forcing an early one . I just don't see the benefit unless a massive scandal grips wynne's government but has already been many and is still people saying there going to continue voting for her


Its really a matter of timing;
A spring 2018 election allows for the OLP to pass a big spending budget;
Whereas a Fall 2017 election does not.
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2016 4:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
RCO wrote:

just don't see either parties wanting an early election ? seem too risky when they know wynne is going to call one in early 2018 ? anyways , why risk annoying the voters by forcing an early one . I just don't see the benefit unless a massive scandal grips wynne's government but has already been many and is still people saying there going to continue voting for her


Its really a matter of timing;
A spring 2018 election allows for the OLP to pass a big spending budget;
Whereas a Fall 2017 election does not.


the parties are also worried about fundraising from what I read , that new bill makes it harder to fundraise and such . there trying to hold a lot of events early and bring in some cash now but it likely won't be enough to fund entire campaign .

just don't see the ndp having a lot to gain , already hold all 3 Windsor seats , 3 Hamilton ridings , 2 Niagara seats , 2 London seats and kenora , temiskaming , Algoma , Timmins and nickel belt up north , as well is long targeted Oshawa and Kitchener waterloo / and a Brampton riding as well . I have a hard time coming up with many seats they could pick up ? might be some in Toronto as mentioned and maybe a riding in thunder bay area . I don't see Sudbury coming back yet , Glenn Thibeault is too high profile and well known for a rookie ndp candidate to get that one back

early elections in Ontario usually annoy the voters and go over badly , I don't see the reason to risk it at this point
Bugs





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PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2016 10:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Everything would change if the opposition could frame an issue. In my area, where there are 650 wind turbines. there are Facebook groups stirring each other up over their electricity bills. Where are the politicians?

The NDP does not have enhanced opportunities, as far as I can see. Why would they get more than they already have? Their solutions all involve more government, and even more reliance on the unions as a base of support. Why would they be a solution to the Wynne problem?

If the PCs could just drop their airs, and quit waiting for the public to catch on, they might even make a case for themselves. Let's hope Brown realizes that.
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Oct 19, 2016 8:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
Everything would change if the opposition could frame an issue. In my area, where there are 650 wind turbines. there are Facebook groups stirring each other up over their electricity bills. Where are the politicians?

The NDP does not have enhanced opportunities, as far as I can see. Why would they get more than they already have? Their solutions all involve more government, and even more reliance on the unions as a base of support. Why would they be a solution to the Wynne problem?

If the PCs could just drop their airs, and quit waiting for the public to catch on, they might even make a case for themselves. Let's hope Brown realizes that.


I think they were trying to make hydro rates an issue as well is the economy . a lot of people are upset about rising hydro bills . the pc's have talked a bit about the economy but not yet released a lot of specific ideas or policy on it .

don't see the ndp having a lot to gain , and if the pc's do better a number of there seats could flip back to the pc's . when I look thru there ridings is a number with a lot of pc history . or would typically vote pc when there doing well such as

London west , Kitchener waterloo , Niagara Falls , Oshawa and Brampton area . 3 of these ridings they originally won in protest by-elections then held when there was an anti - hudak vote . not sure there ridings with long term ndp potential or not ?

the ndp may target seats like Brant and Sarnia Lambton but past pushes have not proven successful in those ridings even though there is large ndp bases of support

there is also a number of new open ridings , mostly in the 905 , peel , York and durham area , same is the new federal ridings , there mostly liberal / pc ridings historically as there more suburban areas . these new ridings change the dynamic somewhat and shift more power to the growing suburbs
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Oct 19, 2016 10:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

To my way of thinking, the NDP went for the gold and lost. In doing so, the Honorable Thomas Mulcair showed the Canadian public that the NDP is just like all the other politicians. He lied -- is that too strong? How about he prevaricated, and puffed up the NDP offering beyond the public's ability to suspend disbelief. Is that gentle enough?

My point is the wind is no longer in the NDP sails. The public was built up and got excited over nothing. Now the NDP is a party without a leader, and without many people who want to be their leader. Their membership has been roiled up with left-right antagonisms, battles between the revolutionary socialists, the revolutionary environmentalists, and the little people who just want everybody to be nice to each other.

How does that translate into Ontario politics? We don't know, but my bet would be that some of their energy reserves were used up in these battles, and in additionj, why would the public see the NDP as an alternative to the Liberals when they claim to be even further left?

Translating it to the hydro issue, why aren't Conservatives pointing to the fact that state ownership is not the answer? Why aren't they framing the issue as an example of public versus private ownership?

Just a thought, but out where I live, it just doesn't make sense spending 11 cents to make something that you sell for 2 cents. Mind you, my neighbors are simple people, and don't have the sophistication of more urban groups.
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Oct 19, 2016 7:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( some changes to the election laws , electronic vote counting machines , a june election and a commission to review the 2 northern ridings of Kenora rainy river and timmins james bay and possibly create new ridings for that area ? )


Ontario moves election date to June 7, 2018


Fall elections and vote-counting machines to speed results part of electoral reforms proposed in Ontario



Yasir Naqvi unveiled changes to Ontario's election laws Wednesday.

Yasir Naqvi unveiled changes to Ontario's election laws Wednesday. (Andrew Francis Wallace / Toronto Star) | Order this photo



By Rob FergusonQueen's Park Bureau

Wed., Oct. 19, 2016



Ontario’s next election will be moved ahead to June 7, 2018 and ballots counted electronically to shorten nail-biting waits for winners under a proposed modernization of voting laws.

Moving the election date from the fall — when weather can be more unpredictable and darkness comes early — are aimed at improving voter turnout and eliminating overlap with municipal campaigns, Attorney General Yasir Naqvi said Wednesday.

The changes were recommended by Elections Ontario chief Greg Essensa but do not include other reforms he has advocated, such as holding elections on weekends or holidays to get more people to cast ballots.

Naqvi said the government has adopted “key” suggestions from Essensa and signalled online voting cannot be considered until it can be rendered foolproof, given recent high-profile incidents of hacking. But he did leave the door open for it to be tested in a byelection at some point.

“We’ve got to be very, very sure,” Naqvi told reporters at Harbord Collegiate Institute, where he chatted with students about new provisions allowing them to pre-register as voters in the two years before their 18th birthdays.


“People feel confidence when they do the paper ballot.”

Youth registration is intended to get voting on the radar of teens before they head off to college or university, given that turnout for the under-24 crowd was just 34 per cent in the 2014 election.

For the entire population, the rate was 51 per cent. While that was an improvement from 2011, it’s still too low given that participation had been steadily declining since 1990, Naqvi said.

He called voter turnout “a very real challenge.”

The declines are what prompted Essensa to call for a number of changes in his last two annual reports, which touted the need for more technology to streamline operations and reduce the number of election staff across the province.

It takes about 76,000 workers at about 8,000 polling stations and returning offices to conduct an election, including advance polls.

Electronic voting tabulators were used successfully in the Whitby-Oshawa byelection last winter, allowing for faster results.

Essensa has said previously that results can be tabulated within about 30 minutes of the polls closing by using machines, meaning winners can be announced as much as 45 minutes or an hour sooner than when ballots are counted by hand.

The changes in the Election Statute Law Amendment Act, which Naqvi introduced in the legislature after the news conference, would require approval by a majority of MPPs.

Naqvi’s long-promised bill amends previous reforms enacted by former premier Dalton McGuinty, who set fixed election dates every four years on the first Thursday in October.

Essensa has argued that weather conditions are better for campaigning and voting in the spring, recommending votes be held the first Thursday in June — which follows the first planting in agricultural areas and avoids the busy fall harvest time.

The bill would also give Essensa’s office the power to fine owners of apartment and condo buildings refusing to allow candidates and volunteers to canvass voters on the premises.

In the north, the province would establish a special electoral boundaries commission to review the remote and massive ridings of Kenora-Rainy River and Timmins-James Bay, recommending one or two new ridings in those areas for the 2018 election.

https://www.thestar.com/news/queenspark/2016/10/19/ontario-moves-election-date-to-june-7-2018.html
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Ontario pc's lead liberals 41% to 28 % in new poll

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