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RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Oct 07, 2016 8:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( there appears to be only 2 candidates for this nomination , previously mentioned Nathalie de Rosiers and Lucille Collard )


Map ›

uOttawa Young Liberals - Jeunes libéraux de l'U d'Ottawa ›

Meet your Ottawa-Vanier Provincial Nomination Candidates!


Come join the University of Ottawa Young Liberals in a conversation with the Ottawa-Vanier provincial nomination candidates, Nathalie Des Rosiers and Lucille Collard.

Event will be taking place October 5th from 7:30pm- 9:00pm in Room 137 of Fauteux Hall.





https://www.evensi.ca/meet-your-ottawa-vanier-provincial-nomination-candidates/187449379
RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Oct 15, 2016 9:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Liberals last of major parties to choose provincial candidate for Ottawa-Vanier byelection

Nomination race Saturday afternoon largely between two lawyers

CBC News Posted: Oct 15, 2016 5:00 AM ET| Last Updated: Oct 15, 2016 5:00 AM ET

Madeleine Meilleur stepped down as MPP for Ottawa-Vanier in June after representing the riding for more than two decade


The byelection for the provincial riding of Ottawa-Vanier is expected to be called within weeks if not days of the Liberal nomination candidate being selected on Saturday.

While the riding is considered a Liberal stronghold, the Liberals are the last of the three major parties to choose a candidate for the race to replace former MPP and auditor general Madeleine Meilleur.

Liberal candidates in Ottawa-Vanier
Lucille Collard, Nathalie DesRosiers and Persévérance Mayer are all running to replace former MPP and auditor general Madeleine Meilleur as the Liberal candidate in Ottawa-Vanier. (Radio-Canada)

Choosing a Liberal candidate was likely delayed when Ottawa-Vanier Coun. Mathieu Fleury — Meilleur's apparent successor — declined the offer to run provincially.

Three women are standing for the Liberal nomination:
■Lucille Collard, a staff lawyer for the Federal Court of Appeal and a school board trustee since 2010.
■Nathalie DesRosiers, the dean of common law at the University of Ottawa, and formerly the general counsel at the Canadian Civil Liberties Association. In 2013, she was named to the Order of Canada.
■Persévérance Mayer, co-founder of the Ligue des Africains du Canada. She declined to speak with Radio-Canada ahead of Saturday's nomination meeting.


Premier Kathleen Wynne, who's been in town for a couple days, is expected to be at nomination meeting being held Saturday at É​cole secondaire publique De La Salle.

Although the byelection doesn't have to be called until January, the government is expected to call it soon once the Liberals get their electoral ducks in a row.

Toronto Andre Marin
Andre Marin is running as the PC candidate in Ottawa-Vanier. (Aaron Vincent Elkaim/The Canadian Press)

The Progressive Conservatives announced a star candidate last month in former Ontario ombudsman Andre Marin, who is probably best-known for scathing reports about Hydro One overbilling customers and treating them "abominably." Indeed, he appears to be basing much of his campaign taking aim at the Liberals' electricity policies and prices.




Marin is also known for openly campaigning to extend his position as ombudsman, and for spending hundreds of thousands of taxpayer money for him to commute to his Queen's Park job from his home in Ottawa.

Claude Bisson, NDP candidate for Ottawa-Vanier byelection
Claude Bisson is running in the upcoming Ottawa-Vanier byelection for the NDP. (From Facebook)



The NDP selected its candidate Claude Bisson in the summer.

Retired from a 30-year career in the RCMP, Bisson lists a multitude of ways he's been involved in the community, from coaching girls hockey to helping stop the destruction of the forest along Bathgate Road.

Bisson has also been involved in NDP politics at a familial level, working on the campaign of his younger brother Gilles, the longtime NDP MPP for Timmins-James Bay.



The Green Party of Ontario doesn't have a date set yet for its nomination, but is expected to announce one within days.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/.....-1.3806295
Progressive Tory





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PostPosted: Sat Oct 15, 2016 10:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

the Liberals seem to have three strong candidates. I wonder if that would have been possible in a riding that wasn't so Liberal. Will Wynne be able to attract good people to run in swing ridings?
RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Oct 15, 2016 11:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Progressive Tory wrote:
the Liberals seem to have three strong candidates. I wonder if that would have been possible in a riding that wasn't so Liberal. Will Wynne be able to attract good people to run in swing ridings?


Ottawa Vanier is a very liberal riding so there'd always be people willing to run for them there . the Ontario ndp is also weaker provincially in Ottawa than federally so that helps them too

there hasn't been a lot of names released or floated around yet of possible liberal candidates in open ridings for which there is many , since some new ridings without incumbents are being added mostly around Toronto area . its too early to say , also a number of liberal mpp's likely to retire she'll need to replace
RCO





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PostPosted: Sun Oct 16, 2016 9:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Voter disqualifications mar nomination of Des Rosiers in Ottawa-Vanier

Don Butler, Ottawa Citizen
More from Don Butler, Ottawa Citizen

Published on: October 15, 2016 | Last Updated: October 15, 2016 7:19 PM EDT


Nathalie Des Rosiers has won the nomination to represent the Liberal party in the byelection for the provincial riding of Ottawa-Vanier.

Nathalie Des Rosiers has won the nomination to represent the Liberal party in the byelection for the provincial riding of Ottawa-Vanier. Errol McGihon / Postmedia



Ontario Liberals chose Nathalie Des Rosiers Saturday to represent the party in a coming byelection in Ottawa-Vanier. But the choice was marred by a controversy over the disqualification of more than 100 supporters of one of her opponents.

Des Rosiers, the dean of Common Law at the University of Ottawa, was a star recruit for Kathleen Wynne’s governing Liberals. If she wins in the byelection, made necessary by the resignation of longtime MPP Madeleine Meilleur, she’s likely ticketed for a cabinet post.

But she faced strong opposition from two other candidates: Lucille Collard, a federal government lawyer and school board trustee, and Persévérance Mayer, co-founder of the Ligue des Africains du Canada.

But even before voting began Saturday, there was controversy over the disqualification of 105 Collard supporters — a group she said represented up to 30 per cent of her backers.

Their names were left off the voting list when nominations closed Oct. 11 because their membership fees had been deposited in a party account in Ottawa instead of being forwarded with their membership forms to Toronto, as required by the party’s constitution.



Lucille Collard

Lucille Collard had 105 of her supporters disqualified because their membership fees had been deposited in a party account in Toronto instead of being forwarded with their membership forms to Toronto, as required by the party’s constitution. Errol McGihon / Postmedia

In an interview Saturday before the results were known, Collard said she sent the forms to party headquarters in Toronto but delivered the membership fees to the Liberal party riding office in Ottawa-Vanier.

“I assume that the person in the riding office, having worked there for many years, would know where the money should be going,” she said.

Collard said she had been following the same process since the beginning of the nomination campaign. “Nobody said, ‘Oh, by the way, where’s the money?’ “

Collard said she wasn’t notified that there was a problem until she received an email “in the middle of the night” after the Oct. 11 deadline had passed.

“This is a technicality that shouldn’t take people’s rights away. It’s unacceptable, not only because it affects me as a candidate. It affects all those people’s democratic right to vote. That is what is really making me upset.”

Jennifer Cavanagh was one of the disenfranchised Collard voters. She showed up at the nomination meeting with a copy of her membership form in hand, but was turned away because her name wasn’t on the voting list.

“I think it’s disgraceful,” said Cavanagh, who signed up as a member because Collard appealed to her as a candidate. “I feel very strongly that every person has a vote and that’s how democracy works.”

Lisa Stillborn, the party’s vice-president for Eastern Ontario, said the rule is that the nomination forms and the membership money “have to travel together.” Responsibility rests with the candidates and their teams to ensure that happens, she said.

“Everyone knew what the deadline was and everybody knew what the rules of procedure under the constitution were. It’s very regrettable.”

Stillborn said she had been approached by at least a dozen people who were very upset because they were unable to vote. “It’s heartbreaking.”

It’s unclear what impact the disqualifications had on the voting. A total of 419 ballots were cast, but because the voting was by preferential ballot — where voters rank their first, second and third choices — there was no first-past-the-post-style final tally.

After Des Rosiers was announced as the winner, a resigned Collard said she would continue to “work in the Liberal family” because she still believed in Liberal values and thought the riding should remain in Liberal hands.

But she said she planned to “take a hard look” at what impact the disqualification of her supporters had on the outcome. “We need to make analysis and decide on a course of action,” she said, adding that she didn’t know if there was any way of contesting the results.

Des Rosiers said it was “always sad when people come and they want to vote and for some procedural reason they can’t.

“But the rules were the same for everyone,” she said. “I think it’s important that we follow the rules for everyone. Otherwise, it becomes even more of a controversy.”

No date has been announced for the byelection yet, but Wynne is expected to call it soon. Des Rosiers will face off against another high-profile candidate — former Ontario ombudsman André Marin, who is running for the Progressive Conservatives.

http://ottawacitizen.com/news/.....awa-vanier
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2016 8:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Reevely: The Liberals' gift to the Progressive Conservatives in Ottawa-Vanier


David Reevely
More from David Reevely

Published on: October 17, 2016 | Last Updated: October 17, 2016 3:55 PM EDT


Nathalie Des Rosiers won the nomination to represent the Liberal party in the byelection for the provincial riding of Ottawa-Vanier. The Liberals have a dominant position there, but they're not doing themselves any favours.

Nathalie Des Rosiers won the nomination to represent the Liberal party in the byelection for the provincial riding of Ottawa-Vanier. The Liberals have a dominant position there, but they're not doing themselves any favours. Errol McGihon / Postmedia



The Ontario Liberals are a long way from blowing the upcoming byelection in Ottawa-Vanier, but this is what blowing it would look like as it begins.

The thing hasn’t even been called yet, but all three major parties have their nominees. Premier Kathleen Wynne spent half of last week here, went back to Toronto for Monday morning question period at Queen’s Park, and then returned to Ottawa Monday afternoon.

She’s spread herself out — a harvest fair in Kanata, a hospital wing opening in Nepean. But just a couple of weeks ago, she was here to personally announce new daycare spaces at a French elementary school in Vanier. Monday afternoon, her schedule included a hit at the University of Ottawa, home base for her party’s Ottawa-Vanier candidate Nathalie Des Rosiers, and then a women-in-politics panel. It’s a campaign without the official call.

The fundamentals favour the Liberals. Ottawa-Vanier has historically been one of the safest red seats in the province — in the country, even. Liberals used to reliably get 70 per cent of the vote there, and that’s slipped to around 50 per cent over the last 20 years or so. That’s still a dominant position and Progressive Conservative candidate André Marin would set a modern-day record if he could get 30 per cent.

But byelections are weird. Turnout’s usually low, meaning protest voters have more power than usual. With the Liberals’ majority not in question, their supporters won’t be as motivated, and the Liberals are not popular provincially. The Tories just won a byelection in Scarborough-Rouge River, a seat that’s not nearly as solid a Liberal stronghold as Ottawa-Vanier but that the Liberals had still won 10 times in a row. If the Tories can take Ottawa-Vanier, they’ll have quite a story to tell about Liberal collapse.



(There’s also a New Democratic Party candidate, retired senior civilian RCMP member Claude Bisson. The NDP has basically no machinery in Eastern Ontario any more; the provincial party hasn’t won a seat here since the 1990s.)

As the former provincial ombudsman, Marin knows the issues about as well as any sitting MPP and probably has more stories of government screwups than anybody. He has name recognition that extends to a small army of supporters across Ontario who adore him for bluntly championing the little guy. They can’t vote in Ottawa-Vanier but they can certainly donate money; Marin’s campaign will be as well funded as any could be.

He’s picked electricity prices as his main issue. They’ve risen sharply, obviously, and angered a lot of people, obviously. Though if the Tories have a plan to bring then down again, they’re not being obvious about it.

Progressive Conservative Leader Patrick Brown has been in Ottawa-Vanier to canvass repeatedly since the party picked Marin as its candidate less than a month ago, with other senior party figures like finance critic Vic Fedeli pulling door-knocking shifts, too. They did it in Scarborough and it worked there; they’ll keep doing it here for months if they have to.

Even so, local Tories know Marin is in an uphill fight. He doesn’t live in Ottawa-Vanier, which is a big deal. It’s hard to overstate the political importance of being part of Vanier’s francophone community when you’re running for office there. The model politician is Bernard Grandmaître — a Vanier businessman, alderman and mayor before running for provincial office. Then came Claudette Boyer — a University of Ottawa graduate, career teacher, Vanier school trustee. Then Madeleine Meilleur — who never misses a chance to talk about her nursing days at the francophone-icon Montfort Hospital before she became a lawyer, made good at Canada Post, and entered politics on city council in Vanier.

In this byelection, the candidate in the Grandmaître-Boyer-Meilleur mould would have been Lucille Collard, the lawyer and French public school trustee for Rideau-Vanier. Coun. Mathieu Fleury, who had Meilleur’s blessing to succeed her until he decided he didn’t want to half-move to Toronto, gave Collard’s nomination speech. One of Fleury’s prominent opponents in the last municipal election, Catherine Fortin LeFaivre, backed Collard as well. Des Rosiers lives in Sandy Hill and as a law dean at the University of Ottawa, with a long record in civil-liberties work, is a star candidate in her own right. She just didn’t come up in politics the same way.

But more than 100 of Collard’s would-be nomination voters were disqualified at Saturday’s nomination meeting because of a bureaucratic foulup — her campaign apparently sent in those voters’ new Liberal membership dues incorrectly. Even if Des Rosiers would have won the nomination anyway, that’s the sort of thing that costs a campaign in volunteers, in enthusiasm and energy. It’s one thing to lose, something else to lose on the persnickety enforcement of a technicality.



“Stay tuned,” is all that Premier Kathleen Wynne will say when she’s asked when the election will be. (At a public event Friday, Ottawa-Orléans MPP Marie-France Lalonde taught her the French idiom: “À suivre.”)

They could use the extra time.

Infighting over “safe” seats is a bad start for a party that really needs a win.

http://ottawacitizen.com/news/.....awa-vanier
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2016 11:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think a Liberal loss in Ottawa-Vanier is still highly unlikely;
If that occurs we could find ourselves in an election situation with just a few resignations from the government side.
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2016 2:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
I think a Liberal loss in Ottawa-Vanier is still highly unlikely;
If that occurs we could find ourselves in an election situation with just a few resignations from the government side.


but why this odd delay to even call the by-election ( it could of been called for same day as scarborough rouge river ) , especially odd as they need to have a federal by election in the same riding and you think they'd want to get the provincial one out of the way , they can't have them both at the same time or within days / weeks of each other so the fall is the only realistic time to have one and now that all 3 parties have candidates a delay makes even less sense
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Ontario AG Madeline Meilleur resigns as mpp Ottawa Vanier

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