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RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Jun 24, 2016 7:30 am    Post subject: British PM David Cameron to step down after EU vote Reply with quote

( shocker UK PM David Cameron is going to resign after losing the UK EU vote , this is a great loss for the UK conservatives , Cameron was popular and had lead them to a majority , the first in years , after years of labour majorities . )


Brexit: David Cameron to quit after UK votes to leave EU


Prime Minister David Cameron is to step down by October after the UK voted to leave the European Union.

Speaking outside 10 Downing Street, he said "fresh leadership" was needed.

The PM had urged the country to vote Remain but was defeated by 52% to 48% despite London, Scotland and Northern Ireland backing staying in.

UKIP leader Nigel Farage hailed it as the UK's "independence day", while Boris Johnson said the result would not mean "pulling up the drawbridge".

Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said she was "absolutely determined" to keep Scotland in the EU so a second Scottish independence referendum was now "highly likely".


EU chiefs said they expected the UK to begin negotiations to leave "as soon as possible, however painful that process may be".

But Boris Johnson, the ex-London mayor and public face of Vote Leave who is now a frontrunner to be next prime minister, said there was "no need for haste" about severing the UK's ties.

He said voters had "searched in their hearts" and the UK now had a "glorious opportunity" to pass its own laws, set its own taxes and control its own borders.

Another leading Leave campaigner, Labour's Gisela Stuart said the UK would be a "good neighbour" when it left the EU.

The pound fell to its lowest level against the dollar since 1985 as the markets reacted to the results.




Media captionEU vote: David Cameron says the UK "needs fresh leadership"

Flanked by his wife Samantha, Mr Cameron announced shortly after 08:15 BST that he had informed the Queen of his decision to remain in place for the short term and to then hand over to a new prime minister by the time of the Conservative conference in October.

He would attempt to "steady the ship" over the coming weeks and months, but that it would be for the new prime minister to carry out negotiations with the EU and invoke Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty, which would give the UK two years to negotiate its withdrawal, he said.

"The British people have voted to leave the European Union and their will must be respected," said Mr Cameron. "The will of the British people is an instruction that must be delivered."


Maps
Area-by-area in maps: See how people voted

Bank of England governor Mark Carney said UK banks' "substantial capital and huge liquidity" allowed them to continue to lend to businesses and households.

The Bank of England is ready to provide an extra £250bn of support, he added.

The referendum turnout was 71.8% - with more than 30 million people voting - the highest turnout at a UK-wide vote since 1992.

Mr Farage - who has campaigned for the past 20 years for Britain to leave the EU - told cheering supporters "this will be a victory for ordinary people, for decent people".

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, who called for the UK to remain in the EU but was accused of a lukewarm campaign, said poorer communities were "fed up" with cuts and felt "marginalised by successive governments".

"Clearly there are some very difficult days ahead," he said, adding that "there will be job consequences as a result of this decision".

He said the point he had made during the campaign was that "there were good things" about the EU but also "other things that had not been addressed properly".

Lib Dem leader Tim Farron said Labour's leader had been "utterly gutless" in the way he approached the campaign.

And two Labour MPs have submitted a motion of no confidence in Mr Corbyn's leadership which may be debated and voted on by Labour MPs next week.

Mr Johnson and Mr Gove paid tribute to Mr Cameron as they addressed Vote Leave supporters in London alongside Ms Stuart.

Mr Johnson said the UK was "no less united... nor indeed any less European" following the decision to leave the EU.

Meanwhile, at a press conference in Edinburgh, Ms Sturgeon said a second Scottish referendum was "on the table" and that the Scottish government would prepare legislation to enable one.





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Media captionNigel Farage: "Dawn is breaking on an independent United Kingdom"

The European Parliament is to hold an emergency session on Tuesday to discuss the referendum result.

On Twitter, EU Parliament president Martin Schulz called for a "speedy and clear exit negotiation".

But Leave supporting Tory MP Liam Fox said voters had shown great "courage" by deciding to "change the course of history" for the UK and, he hoped, the rest of Europe.


http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-36615028
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Fri Jun 24, 2016 10:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Long Live Prime Minister Boris Johnson.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Sun Jun 26, 2016 11:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is British politics at its best, if you ask me.

Not because of the decision that was made. It's still 'time out' on that one. It's because of the way it has been conducted. Cameron promised a referendum on the issue, and honored it. When his side lost, he promised to resign.

It's not a done deal, of course. The EU has a record of running over its own actual plebiscites, and forcing another until they get the result they want. There were plebiscites like that in Ireland and (I believe) Denmark.

But still, there's a restraint in British politics that's admirable.
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Wed Jun 29, 2016 9:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The situation with the Labour Party is getting interesting.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Jun 29, 2016 10:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It looks like Corbyn is going to be the scapegoat for Brexit.

To me, it's absurd. The EU is a shaky structure at best. The opening of all the national markets of Europe was a wonderful step forward, but the political union, which has followed, has sparked a pan-European rise in nationalism.

It's not a nationalism that is aggressive to the other tribes. It is a nationalism that seeks to keep its local peculiarities out of the hands of . The French are comfortable with the threat of unpasturized cheeses, for example. The British like to drive on the 'wrong' side of rhe road.

It should tell those EU leaders with just a iota of statecraft in them that they are reaching the limits of what they can do.

Instead, there are recriminations. The lesson is not that the political union has to wait a generation for the next steps. They seem to want to double down, to integrate the EU even more, politically.

Corbyn is being blamed because he was supposed to 'deliver' the Labour vote to the Remain side. But he didn't open the gates to immigration, or close the mines. Yet his own party is in open revolt against him.

He's not a very sympathetic character anyway. Will he survive?
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Wed Jun 29, 2016 11:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:

Corbyn is being blamed because he was supposed to 'deliver' the Labour vote to the Remain side. But he didn't open the gates to immigration, or close the mines. Yet his own party is in open revolt against him.

He's not a very sympathetic character anyway. Will he survive?


I am in no way a Corbyn fan;
However he was elected by the base of the party and not the MPs and establishment of the party.

If there was any way that the brass of the Labour Party could find an excuse to oust him, they were going to capitalize on it.

The best part about this entire thing is even if he is "ousted" by the caucus, I see no reason why he wouldn't stand for election for leader again during the next convention and considering how enraged the majority that voted for him last time will likely be, they will crawl over glass to vote for him again.

After all of this, if he is elected again...then what?

Do the MPs who foster this coup till run as Labour MPs in any pending election?

Its going to be brutal over the next few months,
Progressive Tory





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PostPosted: Thu Jun 30, 2016 6:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

No Boris.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Fri Jul 01, 2016 9:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, indeed. In an exquisite bit of treachery -- none are calling it anything but a betrayal -- Boris has been gutted and laid out to dry. It is almost Monty Python crazy.

In Canada, the betrayal would be hidden, and glossed over. The media would look away. Everybody would be counting on a stupid public forgetting.
Progressive Tory





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PostPosted: Mon Jul 04, 2016 10:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It'll be interesting to see what Prime Minister May is like.

We'll also see the UK and the US soon led by women.
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Mon Jul 04, 2016 12:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Progressive Tory wrote:
No Boris.


Yeah,
Dang!

The Tories are lucky the Labour Party is in such disarray at the moment.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Thu Jul 28, 2016 12:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is really remarkable. The British Parliament has essentially re-organized itself in the three or four weeks since the referendum! It seems pretty free-style combat in those few days, and somebody was steering the shlp all the time.

I really don't know what it would be like in Canada. There would likely be delays and an attempt to deny the results, and it would take years of face-saving to accomplish the same thing.
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Thu Jul 28, 2016 12:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

On the Conservative side I am shocked at the "order" in the process in which Cameron was replaced, especially given the current majority mandate term still has nearly four years potentially. (May 7th 2020)

I expected the same sort of carnage we are seeing on the Labour Side;
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British PM David Cameron to step down after EU vote

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