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RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Apr 15, 2016 7:39 am    Post subject: Newfoundland Budget raises taxes on gas , hst , everything ? Reply with quote

( a horrible budget was just brought in by the new liberal government in newfoundland and Labrador , it raises taxes on just about everything , increases taxes on gasoline which is already more expensive out east and increases the HST by 2 % a promise the liberals said they wouldn't do , I guess it doesn't matter what they said during the election as long is the liberals won )



Newfoundland and Labrador budget offers tax hikes, job cuts, $2B deficit

The province's taxpayers will shoulder the burden of a budget that's swimming in red ink.


St. John's, Newfoundland is seen in a file photo. The province's Liberal government is hanging responsibility for a tough budget on the previous Progressive Conservative government.

By: Sue Bailey The Canadian Press Published on Thu Apr 14 2016



ST. JOHN'S, N.L. — Critics are calling Newfoundland and Labrador's new spending plan the Tax on Pretty Much Everything Budget, saying it could repel investment and migration to a province that badly needs both.


"We cannot tax our way back to prosperity," Des Whelan, chairman of the St. John's Board of Trade, said as the new Liberal government delivered its first fiscal blueprint Thursday.


"In this budget we have seen an increase in every tax, fee and levy that you could possibly do. That's going to take money out of the hands of small business people and it's going to hamper our ability to have our province's economy grow."


Perhaps the worst part? Despite that dizzying range of tax and fee hikes on everything from gasoline to ferry rides — including a "temporary" deficit-fighting levy of up to $900 a year for top earners — the forecast deficit is still $1.8 billion.


Finance Minister Cathy Bennett blamed 12 years of Progressive Conservative rule that ended when the Liberals won power last fall, promising "a stronger tomorrow."


She accused the Tories of squandering historic wealth with spending increases and tax cuts hinged on volatile oil prices that have since crashed.


"The previous government's willingness to mortgage our future has left Newfoundland and Labrador with the biggest deficit and highest net debt ever recorded in our history," Bennett said in her speech to the legislature.


"As our premier has said, knee-jerk reactions have created mistakes that, unfortunately, Newfoundlanders and Labradorians are paying for now.




"Band-aid solutions will not fix the challenges we face."


The $8.5-billion budget includes infrastructure investment and some new health and education spending as net debt is forecast to reach $14.6 billion from $12.6 billion last year.


Gas taxes are going up by 16.5 cents per litre — double the current rate — starting June 2, adding about $8 to fill a mid-size vehicle tank. The increase will be reviewed next fall when the government delivers a fiscal update that will include "continuing action" to clean up a fiscal mess years in the making, Bennett said.


She hinted at measures to create a "sustainable" public service that has swelled in size over the last decade.


Government spending has also soared. The Canadian Federation of Independent Business has reported that between 2003 and 2014, inflation-adjusted program and operating spending grew almost 30 per cent, while population growth was just 1.6 per cent.


An income-based levy of up to $900 is being imposed on all taxpayers to fight the deficit, with the exception of those earning $20,000 of taxable income or less. Bennett said this "temporary tax" will be phased out starting in 2018 as finances presumably improve.


The HST rate will increase by two percentage points to 15 per cent as of July 1 — reversing a rollback Premier Dwight Ball campaigned on, calling the higher rate a "job killer."


Measures to cut government spending and raise cash are expected to cost average families about $3,000 in new taxes and lost baby bonuses while eliminating about 650 public-sector and 2,000 private jobs.


Bennett, who did not buy new shoes as per budget day tradition, said the hard-hitting blueprint affects everyone.


Income taxes are going up for all brackets. Those earning $35,000 to $70,000 will pay 13.5 per cent, up from 12.5 per cent. The rate rises another percentage point next year.


Corporate income tax rates will go to 15 per cent from 14 per cent, retroactive to Jan. 1, 2016.


Starting Friday, tobacco tax also climbs by one cent per cigarette.


Class sizes are increasing for Grades 4 to 12, affecting an undetermined number of teaching positions. And the operational grant to Memorial University of Newfoundland has been cut by $14 million.


Bennett stressed that the province has still provided cash to help the university keep tuition rates among the lowest in the country, but that it's up to administrators to set fees.


The budget forecasts a return to modest surplus by 2022-23, assuming Brent crude sells for US$74 a barrel, up from about US$44 in trading this week. Offshore oil royalties that once provided 30 per cent of provincial revenues have plunged to an estimated seven per cent at $502.1 million.


A global supply glut has helped drive prices down from US$115 a barrel since mid-2014.


"Our province has been left in a very difficult situation because of the circumstances and the decisions the former administration made, and because of the rapid decline in oil price," Bennett told reporters Thursday.


"And we have a tremendous amount of work to do to change that."


Former premier Paul Davis, now leader of the Opposition, said blaming the previous regime "is the oldest trick in the book."


The budget flies in the face of election promises the Liberals made last November, he said.


"You won't be able to walk across the street without paying a fee. They're smothering the economy. They're smothering Newfoundlanders and Labradorians.


"This is in no way what they sold the people of the province on as a stronger tomorrow and a better way forward."

http://www.metronews.ca/news/c.....-cuts.html
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Apr 15, 2016 7:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A budget to drive Newfoundlanders away


Facing a huge deficit, Newfoundland and Labrador chose to heap taxes and levies on its labour force—and send a dire message to its young people


Charlie Gillis

April 14, 2016


Newfoundland and Labrador Finance Minister Cathy Bennett makes her way past colleagues after presenting the 2016 provincial budget at the House of Assembly in St.John's, Thursday, April 14, 2016. (Paul Daly/CP)
Newfoundland and Labrador Finance Minister Cathy Bennett makes her way past colleagues after presenting the 2016 provincial budget at the House of Assembly in St.John’s, Thursday, April 14, 2016. (Paul Daly/CP)

As expected, Thursday’s Newfoundland budget proved a fount of nausea-inducing numbers—but the most disturbing can be found in the province’s birth and death rolls, not its red-splattered balance sheet.

Since 1971, Newfoundland and Labrador has gone from boasting the country’s lowest median age, 20.9, to its highest, at 45. That’s five years older than the Canadian median.

Why does this stat line matter? Because the scrip that Finance Minister Cathy Bennett wrote for Newfoundland’s fiscal crisis is sure to make matters worse, driving away the young, hard-working people she desperately needs. Instead of addressing the collapse in oil royalties with an aggressive cut to provincial spending—à la Ralph Klein in 1990s Alberta—Bennett has looked almost exclusively to the revenue side, jacking up everything from provincial income taxes to the fee for licensing an old Edsel. The government even flip-flopped on its recent decision to hold down the HST.



The most infuriating move to many Newfoundlanders, however, will be the imposition of a “deficit reduction levy” ranging from $300 to $900, depending on income. A worker making $49,500, for example, would pay $600; someone making $74,500 (considered middle-income in Toronto) will pay $750. People making more than $202,499 (not unheard of among tradesmen working the province’s mega-projects) will shell out the full $900.



Which brings us to the age thing. Because, symbolically speaking, it’s hard to imagine a money grab more repellent to a working-age person than this “temporary” measure. It as much as admits that the reward for getting a job, working longer hours or earning a long-awaited raise is the privilege of bailing the government out its budgetary bind. Even after hiking taxes on incomes and gas, and after raising fees for insurance, birth certificates and death certificates, Bennett evidently sees no option but to fish in Newfoundlanders’ pockets for whatever nickels and dimes are left.

Some already appear to be voting with their feet. After four years of healthy growth, the size of the province’s labour force declined in both 2014 and 2015. It now stands at about 269,200, down about 5,600 from its peak in 2013. With their job options dwindling, and their government apparently bent on taking from them whatever it can, young Newfoundlanders are once again boarding planes and ferries in search of brighter prospects.

Did Bennett have other options?

Surely. This is a province where gross provincial spending rose from $5 billion at the start of its oil boom in 2005 to $8 billion in 2015. Per capita, Newfoundland routinely spent 20 to 36 per cent more during that period than the average of other provinces, hiring workers and doling out raises. No one relishes the thought of laying off public-sector workers, or cutting cherished services. But the numbers alone called for a more equitable distribution of pain.

Instead, the government sought to minimize public-sector job reductions, saying it would cut 650 positions from a public service of 46,000. The projected savings from its cost-cutting, alas, will cover just $243 million of what would have been a $2.7-billion deficit. The heavy lifting is instead to be done through a projected $647 million of tax and fee hikes, which are supposed to pull this year’s deficit down to $1.83 billion.

By imposing these burdens, the government hopes it can buy some time, while continuing to fund the services required by a population only beginning to exert the full weight of its need on the provincial treasury—in health care, home-care and ancillary services.

How many working-age people will stay in Newfoundland and keep paying? That, apparently, is a question for another day.

http://www.macleans.ca/news/ca.....ders-away/
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Apr 15, 2016 7:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

7 ways the Newfoundland and Labrador budget could affect you

Baby bonuses axed, fees hiked in budget 2016

By Ariana Kelland, CBC News Posted: Apr 14, 2016 5:40 PM NT| Last Updated: Apr 14, 2016 5:40 PM NT

Just about everyone in Newfoundland and Labrador will be affected in some way by the 2016 budget.


There's no doubt about it: this year's budget will be felt just about everywhere.
■N.L. budget: $1.83B deficit, across-the-board tax hikes and layoffs
■From birth to death, budget makes it more expensive to live in N.L.

The $1.83-billion deficit and subsequent fallout shouldn't come as a complete shock, as the Newfoundland and Labrador government has been warning about it since taking office last December.

If you own a car — you'll pay more. If you angle for salmon — yup, you'll pay more.

And if you use a ferry to go to and from your community — you guessed it, you'll pay more.

Bye, bye baby bonus

There's bad news for any parent who relies heavily on the province's parental benefits program — or in other words, baby bonuses.

The Progressive Family Growth Benefit provided parents with a $1,000 lump sum payment to residents of the province who give birth to a baby or have a child placed with them for adoption.

The benefit came into effect in 2008, but has been cut in this year's budget.

As well, parents will no longer receive the $100 monthly payment for the first year of their child's life.

This cost-saving measure will result in $10.4 million in annual savings. It's noted in budget documents that the parental program is not offered in other provinces.

Like salmon? Too bad.

Last year, it was moose hunters who felt a hit in the pocketbook. This time, it's salmon anglers' turn.

Atlantic Salmon
The cost of owning a salmon licence has increased by $6. Non-residents will pay $27 more in order to fish for salmon. (Robert F. Bukaty and Jason Leighton/Associated Press)

The cost for an individual salmon licence is going up by $6, effective at the beginning of the 2016-17 season.

The cost is even more if you're not a provincial resident.

Trout and wolf licence fees will also be increased.

Don't get caught texting and driving

If you needed another reason not to drive while distracted, this budget will do it.

The Department of Justice and Public Safety is increasing the amount of money offenders pay for distracted driving convictions.

The maximum fine was $400, but repeat offenders can now expect to face fines upwards of $750.

Can waiting at motor vehicle registration get any more painful? Of course!

Speaking of driving, that will cost more regardless if you're a hazard on the road or not.

li-nl-licence-plate-20120424
Registration fees for personal and commercial vehicles as well as motorcycles have increased. (CBC)

It will now cost $180 to register a passenger vehicle, or a hike of $40. It's cheaper if you do it all online.

Commercial vehicles will cost 12.5 per cent more to register.

Fee changes will come into effect on May. 1.

Life, death and marriage will cost you ... more

Congratulations, you've given birth. Now, hand the province $35 (unless you do it online, in which case you get a $5 discount).

Like birth certificates, the cost of marriage and death certificates will rise from $20 to $35 - $30 if you do it online.

The cost of a marriage licence has also gone up by $50.

All aboard!

Residents who rely on provincial ferries to travel to and from their communities can add a couple more dollars to their pocket before heading onboard.

Despite the many issues plaguing old (and new) ferries, the cost of travelling on one has hiked.

MV Veteran docked in Fogo Island-Change Islands run
The MV Veteran services the Fogo Island-Change Island run. (Chris Ensing/CBC)

Depending on where you live, residents can expect to be paying as much as several dollars more per one-way trip.

Camping and parks

There will be new fees introduced and old fees hiked for access to parks and campgrounds across the province.

Starting in the 2017-18 season, entry fees will be introduced for the Cape St. Mary's Ecological Reserve and Mistaken Point.

Camping at Pippy Park will cost slightly more, while nightly and daily camping fees have risen by a couple of dollars.

Snapshot of NL budget 2016
Residents of Newfoundland and Labrador can expect to pay more, while getting less. (Ariana Kelland/CBC)

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/.....-1.3535897
Bugs





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PostPosted: Fri Apr 15, 2016 9:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Are people finally waking up to the importance of oil in our national economy?

Newfoundland has been hit by the drop in oil prices. Oil pays royalties as well as taxes. Much of the cost of gasoline is taxes.

So, what do governments do? They just dig the spurs in a little deeper. More taxes. And they continue their wanton ways. In Newfoundland, they blame Harper.
Progressive Tory





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PostPosted: Sat Apr 16, 2016 6:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
In Newfoundland, they blame Harper.


Do they?
Bugs





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PostPosted: Sat Apr 16, 2016 11:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is it only Danny Williams, then. that urges Progressive Conservatives to vote Liberal federally?
Progressive Tory





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PostPosted: Sun Apr 17, 2016 2:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
Is it only Danny Williams, then. that urges Progressive Conservatives to vote Liberal federally?

Danny Williams seemed more interested in people voting NDP than Liberal actually. But if you hadn't realized he left politics 5 and a half years ago. Since that time we had a PC premier who endorsed Harper, one who was a member of the Conservative Party, one who had a dispute with Harper but still wouldn't wade into the federal election. And now we have a Liberal government. I don't know what any of this has to do with the current budget, you just seemed to be obsessed with Danny Williams.
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2016 7:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
Are people finally waking up to the importance of oil in our national economy?

Newfoundland has been hit by the drop in oil prices. Oil pays royalties as well as taxes. Much of the cost of gasoline is taxes.

So, what do governments do? They just dig the spurs in a little deeper. More taxes. And they continue their wanton ways. In Newfoundland, they blame Harper.



its no doubt newfoundland would be doing better financially if oil prices were higher , that being said I still thinks its obvious liberal Dwight Ball followed Dalton Mcguinty's lead and lied to beat the pc's last election . I find it hard to believe the liberals had no plans to raise taxes and no intention to raise the hst . its ironic the most hated politician in Newfoundland Stephen Harper was the one who cut the HST ( the federal portion ) and gave them a tax cut but now the " popular liberals " are taking that tax cut away and raising the provincial portion of HST , doesn't exactly make much sense to those looking in
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2016 11:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Its hard for me to be too tough on Dwight Ball;
They inherited the deficits from the PCs, its not like a Federal Liberals situation where they had a balanced budget and then went crazy on spending.

The NFLD budget increases taxes yet still carries a 1.8b deficit;
The Liberals certainly where not the ones who committed to much of that long term spending.

From 2003 and 2014 government spending went up 30% in the face of population growth going up around 2% over that same time.

This a classic situation of assuming the good times will last forever (Oil Prices) and spending like the Venezuelan Government.

Its not a great Liberal Budget, but the Province is in the mess its in largely because of the last guys.
Progressive Tory





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PostPosted: Tue Apr 19, 2016 7:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
Its hard for me to be too tough on Dwight Ball;
They inherited the deficits from the PCs, its not like a Federal Liberals situation where they had a balanced budget and then went crazy on spending.

The NFLD budget increases taxes yet still carries a 1.8b deficit;
The Liberals certainly where not the ones who committed to much of that long term spending.

From 2003 and 2014 government spending went up 30% in the face of population growth going up around 2% over that same time.

This a classic situation of assuming the good times will last forever (Oil Prices) and spending like the Venezuelan Government.

Its not a great Liberal Budget, but the Province is in the mess its in largely because of the last guys.


Spending went up too much over the last 13 years, not so much in the last few years.

With that said, oil revenues have gone from being 33% or more of revenues to now being like 5%.
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Newfoundland Budget raises taxes on gas , hst , everything ?

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