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RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 29, 2016 8:04 am    Post subject: Ontario liberal cabinet ministers given fundraising targets Reply with quote

( you know corruption at queens park is bad when the liberal friendly Toronto star is left to report on it , these cabinet minsters should be doing there job serving the people of Ontario not raising money for the provincial liberals )

News / Queen's Park


Escalating fundraising demands part of ‘the system’ at Queen’s Park: Cohn

In Ontario, the Wild West of fundraising, Liberal cabinet ministers are assigned secret targets as high as $500,000 a year, the Star has learned.

Premier Kathleen Wynne continues to publicly defend Liberal fundraising practices, repeating her stance to reporters earlier this month, writes Martin Regg Cohn.

Steve Russell / Toronto Star file photo

Premier Kathleen Wynne continues to publicly defend Liberal fundraising practices, repeating her stance to reporters earlier this month, writes Martin Regg Cohn.

By: Martin Regg Cohn Provincial Politics Columnist, Published on Tue Mar 29 2016



Kathleen Wynne’s Liberals will rake in roughly $3 million in a single fundraiser Wednesday night.


At their sumptuous Heritage Dinner, “Victory Tables” are priced at $18,000 for corporate high-flyers, and the biggest donors are feted at a private cocktail reception by a grateful premier. But that’s only half the story of how the governing party raises big money.


In Ontario, the Wild West of fundraising, cabinet ministers are assigned secret targets as high as $500,000 a year, the Star has learned.


Related:Ten tough targets for influential cabinet ministers


The unsavoury spectacle of Ontario’s politicians supplicating big business and big labour for events such as the Heritage Dinner is only a small piece of the fundraising puzzle glimpsed by the public. Beyond the showy hobnobbing, shadowy appeals by cabinet ministers for corporate money are the untold story at Queen’s Park.


Corporate and union contributions that Wynne persists in publicly defending create a demonstrable conflict of interest for cabinet ministers, which is why they were banned for federal parties in 2006, and are no longer legal in four other provinces.


And yet, according to multiple sources, top cabinet ministers at Queen’s Park are given financial targets that are typically in the range of $250,000 annually — double that amount in some cases. These quasi-quotas are never written down, conveyed instead by the Ontario Liberal Fund through confidential meetings and phone calls.


They are the price of admission to power, revealed here for the first time, and they are astonishingly high.




The two most marketable ministers are Charles Sousa, the minister of finance, and Eric Hoskins, who helms the province’s $52-billion health care budget. Both are expected to bring in as much as $500,000 a year, well-placed sources have confirmed.


Sousa’s control of the provincial treasury, tax policy and auto insurance makes him a prime target for lobbyists in the banking and insurance industries. But Hoskins is also in high demand because of his regulatory authority over drug companies and nursing home conglomerates.


That’s why Hoskins was the big draw for the Ontario Long Term Care Association at an event organized with the Liberal Fund last year, which offered “an unprecedented opportunity only for OLTCA members” where they could “discuss the sector with the minister, up close and personal.”


Hoskins defends his interactions with such interest groups, describing it as “an important way, I think for Ontarians to participate in the democratic process.” Asked directly about his annual target assigned by the party, Hoskins chose his words carefully: “I do my best to contribute to the party — I think that’s what I’m prepared to say about it.”


The health portfolio is a surprisingly big attraction for donors, according to a former chief fundraiser for the party, Sophia Aggelonitis. “Of course ministers in that portfolio can generate a lot of money — like, huge money,” she told me.


Officially, Ontario’s limit on corporate and union contributions is set at nearly $10,000 a year. But widespread loopholes allow firms to donate several tens of thousands of dollars in busy years — notably during leadership campaigns, where there are no legal limits whatsoever. That’s how Ontario’s big brewers, the Beer Store, and its unions were able to give more than $275,000 to the Liberals in 2013 and 2014.


It quickly adds up, because companies can donate further $9,975 tranches for each campaign period, plus additional thousands to riding associations and candidates. Moreover, subsidiary firms (or affiliated union locals) are able to repeat the same sequence of donations all over again, allowing large corporations to easily exceed six figures — making a mockery of the official limit.


Hence the continuing pressure on cabinet ministers to harvest corporate and union contributions within the legal limit — loopholes and all.


Behind the top ministerial draws, the middle tier of Wynne’s cabinet brings in amounts in the range of $250,000 a year, sometimes much more, according to well-placed sources who spoke on the condition of confidentiality because they were not authorized to reveal party secrets. While it is difficult to be precise, due to the closely guarded nature of the ministerial targets and annual fluctuations, the sources were still able to provide reliable estimates for many (but not all) members of cabinet.


A number of other ministers with less bankable portfolios — responsible for social services or other sectors whose stakeholders have lower cash flow — are given proportionately lower targets to reflect their reduced leverage, closer to the $100,000 range.


Interestingly, while most ministers are careful not to comment publicly about their fundraising activities, they are intensely curious about how much their cabinet colleagues are expected to raise. They really have no idea — and will be reading the numbers here for the first time.


What they do know only too well — and admit to privately — is the extent to which they are thrust into awkward situations that strain the limits of political judgment and personal probity.


In their day jobs, they oversee public funds disbursed to special interest groups, the same vested interests they see after hours for fundraising.


Ministers of the Crown by day, they are supplicants by night, importuning lobbyists to lavish private funds on the governing party: big pharma, big banks, big insurers, big developers, big breweries.


Influencers and influentials — arm in arm, rather than arm’s length.


Yet Wynne continues to publicly defend Liberal fundraising practices, repeating her stance to reporters earlier this month. Asked again Monday to elaborate, the premier’s office issued a statement to the Star saying she would have more to say on the issue in future.


Significantly, however, the statement was silent on the key question posed by the Star about annual fundraising targets for cabinet ministers, neither confirming nor denying the practice. Instead, the premier’s office sidestepped the issue by stressing that the party respects Ontario laws.


“All political parties receive donations and hold fundraisers as part of the democratic process. But there are clear rules that govern these activities.”


Never mind that those laws are badly outdated. The never-ending obligation to raise money — the party burns through millions of dollars a year between campaigns, and spends more than $8 million in general elections — places enormous pressure on the Liberal apparatus. (The Progressive Conservatives also rely heavily on corporate donations, while the New Democrats depend heavily on union contributions, but their annual receipts are dwarfed by the Liberal’s revenues.)


Energy Minister Bob Chiarelli is among the most reliable fundraisers, in the range of $250,000 to $300,000 a year, tasked with tapping into the massive nuclear and electricity sectors that have billions of dollars in annual cash flow. Hence his ability to raise a remarkable $100,000 in a single evening (with Wynne at his side) when Bruce Power brought together a dozen supporters for a cozy Yorkville dinner, as first reported by the Toronto Star in 2013.


At the very time that his intimate fundraiser was being held for stakeholders, his own ministry was deciding on billions of dollars in nuclear spending. (In a repeat performance this year, Chiarelli and Wynne yet again hosted a similar event at the very same venue, albeit at a reduced price per head.)


While sitting cabinet members declined to discuss fundraising details on the record, former ministers are not so circumspect — and are now prepared to publicly repudiate what they were once required to do.


“One of the reasons I quit — and I’m glad you are pursuing this — I was so sick of it,” former Liberal finance minister Dwight Duncan told me in a post-retirement repentance.


“I assume they’re still doing that thing, where ministers have a certain amount, a responsibility to produce,” he added.


“As minister of finance you are in a portfolio where people want to see you, and they’ll pay for it,” said Duncan, who was assigned a target of $1 million per mandate (between election periods).


“It is the wrong system.”


John Gerretsen, who held the sensitive portfolio of attorney general for the Liberals until 2014, describes being deeply troubled by the undeniable conflict of interest.


“I hated the whole aspect of fundraising,” he said in an interview. “If a major issue comes up, and you have been funded by lobbyists on behalf of any kind of industry, you’re going to be affected by that . . . it’s human nature.”


An early supporter of Wynne’s leadership, Gerretsen remains confounded by her paralysis over the issue to date. The premier’s indefatigable fundraising is matched only by her unflinching defence of the indefensible — encouraging her ministers to cozy up to big business and big labour for money, and then granting privileged access in return.


“I don’t know why Kathleen isn’t more actively involved in changing that system,” he mused.


Interestingly, both Duncan and Gerretsen used the same words — “the system” to describe the escalating fundraising demands at Queen’s Park. Long after they left politics, nothing has changed in “the system” — they now renounce.


Today, top ministers have even more stratospheric fundraising targets. And by Wednesday, all members of cabinet will be expected to have sold two additional tables in time for the Heritage Dinner, sources tell me — which works out to $32,000 in extra revenue from each minister.


With special thanks from the premier for their contribution to the system she now presides over.


Tomorrow: How does Premier Kathleen Wynne defend the indefensible?


Martin Regg Cohn’s Ontario politics column appears Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday. mcohn@thestar.ca , Twitter: @reggcohn

http://www.thestar.com/news/qu.....-cohn.html
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Mar 29, 2016 8:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( there is also a new poll from march 2 that I somehow didn't see yet that says pc's lead by 17 points , no wonder wynne wants to fundraise money so desperately , she knows she is going to be in a very tough fight at some point )


Liberals trail PCs by 17 points

March 2, 2016 @ 5:00 AM | Filed under: Ontario


Liberals trail PCs by 17 points

Brown seen as best Premier by wide margin; Wynne’s approvals plummet

TORONTO March 1st - In a random sampling of public opinion taken by the Forum Poll™ among 1148 Ontario voters, well more than 4-in-10 will vote PC if the provincial election were held today (44%), compared to just more than a quarter who would vote Liberal (27%), for a 17 point lead. The NDP would claim just more than a fifth of the vote for third place (22%), while few will vote Green (6%) or for any other party (2%). This stands in comparison to December, 2015, when The PCs led the Liberals by just 3 points (34% to 31%). At that point, the NDP had a quarter of the vote (26%). Thus, the PCs have improved by a significant margin, the Liberals and NDP have lost share equally.

The PC vote is common to the oldest (49%), males (51%) rather than females (37%), the wealthy ($80K to $100K - 52%), in northern Ontario (51%) and among the least educated (50%).

The Liberal vote is characteristic of the youngest (34%), females (32%) rather than males (21%), the least wealthy (often a proxy for youth - 33%), in the Toronto 416 area code (39%) and among the best educated (post grad - 32%).

The NDP vote is especially likely to be mid aged (45 to 54 - 27%), the least wealthy (31%), in southwestern Ontario (26%) and among mothers of children under 18 (30%).

Of note, close to one fifth of those who voted Liberal in the election of 2014 will vote either PC (18%) or NDP (18%) if the election were held today.

PC minority government seen if vote held today

If the results shown above are projected up to seats in the 107 seat Ontario legislature, the PCs would capture a minority of 44, 10 fewer than required for a majority, while the Liberals would claim 35 seats and the NDP 28.

Wynne’s favourables down, Brown’s up

Kathleen Wynne has the approval of just one fifth of voters (20%), and her net favourable score (approve minus disapprove) is a truly awful -47. This represents a slight decline from 23% approval in December, and a net of -38. Patrick Brown has the approval of 3-in-10 voters (30%), and his net is a neutral +2. This is well up from December, when he had the approval of one quarter (25%). Andrea Horwath attracts approval from close to 4-in-10 voters (38%), similar to her number in December (40%). Her net score now is a relatively positive +9, just down from previously (+13).

Thus, Kathleen Wynne underperforms her party in approval, as does Patrick Brown, significantly, while Andrea Horwath outperforms her party in approval.

Patrick Brown seen as best Premier by wide margin

Just more than a quarter of voters see Patrick Brown as the best Premier (26%), compared to considerably fewer who think this of either Kathleen Wynne (17%) or Andrea Horwath (16%). As many as a quarter say none of these leaders would make a good Premier (26%), while about half this proportion don’t have an opinion (14%).

“At approval levels of just one fifth of voters, Kathleen Wynne is in no shape right now to contest an election. However, it is important to remember that the Liberal brand remains strong, and her party outperforms her personally in popularity, which is also the case with Patrick Brown. Unfortunately, Ms Horwath’s party does not seem to be able to aspire to her personal level of approval," said Forum Research President, Dr. Lorne Bozinoff.



Lorne Bozinoff, Ph.D. is the president and founder of Forum Research. He can be reached at lbozinoff@forumresearch.com or at (416) 960-9603.


http://poll.forumresearch.com/.....ls-plummet
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Mar 29, 2016 8:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( also a new forum poll from today that has a 10% pc lead , not as big as previous poll but still a significant lead, no wonder wynne wants to prorogue the legislature and go on vacation )


March 29, 2016 @ 6:00 AM | Filed under: Ontario


PC lead shrinks in Ontario

Slim PC majority seen

TORONTO March 26th - In a random sampling of public opinion taken by the Forum Poll™ among 1225 Ontario voters, 4-in-10 will vote PC if the provincial election were held today (40%), down slightly from last month (February 29 - 44%). In turn, 3-in-10 will vote Liberal (30%), and this is up slightly from last month (27%). One quarter will vote NDP (24%), and this is comparable to results last month (22%).Few will vote Green (5%) or for other parties (1%).

Slim PC majority seen

If these results are projected up to the 107 seat Provincial legislature, the PCs would capture a 3 seat majority of 57 seats, to 26 for the Liberals and 24 for the NDP.

Wynne’s favourables flat, Brown and Horwath slightly down

Premier Wynne has the approval of just one fifth of voters (20%) and this is the same as last month. Her net favourable score (approve minus disapprove) is a very negative -45, similar to -47 last month. Patrick Brown has the approval of one quarter of voters (26%), down slightly from last month (30%) and his net favourable score is a slightly positive +4. As many as one half of voters don’t know enough about him yet to form an opinion (52%). Andrea Horwath has seen her approval decline slightly from just less than 4-in-10 (38%) last month to just more than a third this month (35%), and her net score is a positive +9

Patrick Brown has slight edge as best Premier

Patrick Brown is slightly more likely to be seen as the best Premier (23%) than Andrea Horwath (18%), but both are preferred to the incumbent Premier (14%). The plurality of voters actually thinks none of these contenders can do the job (25%), and almost a fifth don’t have an opinion (19%).

“The PCs are strongly outperforming their leader in appeal, which could present a problem in an election situation. Patrick Brown needs to make himself more known to the electorate, turning some of the “don’t knows” into approval. Ms Horwath, on the other hand, continues to outperform her party in approval, which is also not ideal for an election. People like her personally, but, even with the Liberals in free-fall, her party remains in third place as voters struggle for a reason to vote NDP. It is instructive to note, with their leader at her lowest ratings, the Liberal brand is still relatively strong, and makes a respectable second place showing in voter preference," said Forum Research President, Dr. Lorne Bozinoff.

Lorne Bozinoff, Ph.D. is the president and founder of Forum Research. He can be reached at lbozinoff@forumresearch.com or at (416) 960-9603.


http://poll.forumresearch.com/.....rity-seen/
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Mar 30, 2016 9:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( wynne is promising new fundraising rules by the fall , although not clear what those changes will be )


News / Queen's Park


Wynne promises new fundraising rules after Toronto Star probe

Sweeping changes to political fundraising will be unveiled this fall, says Premier Kathleen Wynne.


Cabinet ministers in Ontario’s Liberal government are assigned secret annual targets to fundraise for the party, the Star revealed.

Aaron Vincent Elkaim / THE CANADIAN PRESS

Cabinet ministers in Ontario’s Liberal government are assigned secret annual targets to fundraise for the party, the Star revealed.

By: Robert Benzie Queen's Park Bureau Chief, Published on Tue Mar 29 2016


Sweeping reforms to clean up political fundraising in Ontario will finally be unveiled this fall, Premier Kathleen Wynne says.


In the wake of an investigation by the Star’s Martin Regg Cohn that revealed cabinet ministers have secret fundraising targets of up to $500,000 a year, Wynne promised new rules and restrictions are coming.


“We will be making changes. We’re working on significant reforms right now. We have been for the last few months,” the premier said Tuesday in Markham.


“The government will bring forward a plan in the fall and that will include new rules on third-party advertising . . . it will also include transitioning away from corporate and union donations, (and) lowering the annual donation limit,” she said, referring to the existing $9,975 contribution cap that is routinely exceeded due to loopholes.


Corporations, unions and individuals can donate much more than their yearly limit by giving additional cash during byelections and by bankrolling candidates during party leadership campaigns.


Wynne stressed that the government is “keeping the transparency measures currently in place on real-time reporting” of political donations that are listed on Elections Ontario’s website.


“We need to change those rules as the social mores change and as the expectations of the public change.”


If the reforms arrive this fall, the new rules would coincide with the 13th anniversary of the Liberals taking power in Ontario.




The premier stressed there would have to be a “transition” period like there was when federal fundraising was revamped more than a decade ago.


“There will be some changes in place before the next election,” she said. “Will all of the changes apply before the next election? Probably not. There does need to be a transition.”


Asked specifically about the ministers’ targets, which are typically in the range of $250,000 annually — though some, such as Finance Minister Charles Sousa, are expected to collect $500,000 a year — Wynne was unrepentant.


“I understand there’s a desire to drive wedges between people. You know that makes a story, but the fact is we’re a team. We have to raise a certain amount of money in order to be able to do the advertising, to run the campaign that we need,” the premier said.


Progressive Conservative MPP Monte McNaughton (Lambton-Kent-Middlesex) said Wynne’s “long overdue” reforms are coming only because the Liberals were caught with their hand in the cookie jar.


“I’ve long believed that democracy shouldn’t be purchased in Ontario and this has made cabinet ministers and the government open to criticism of policy being bought,” said McNaughton.


“It’s ridiculous — taxpayers deserve better. It opens up the current government . . . and future governments to being bought and it’s wrong.”


NDP Leader Andrea Horwath — who held a private, $9,975-a-plate fundraiser last month with Alberta Premier Rachel Notley at the Fairmont Royal York Hotel — warned Wynne against unilateral action.


“New Democrats have long called on the government to fully engage all parties, Elections Ontario and the public when it comes to limiting the influence of big money on our electoral system,” Horwath said in a statement.


“However, we believe that it should not be up to the Liberal Party of Ontario to fundamentally change the rules that govern our democracy on their own. We sincerely hope that any changes will be made through a process that is open and transparent. The strength of our democracy depends on it.”


Economic Development Minister Brad Duguid, who was with Wynne in Markham, declined to disclose his informal fundraising quota, which sources say is in the range of $250,000 to $300,000 a year.


“We all have responsibilities as members of a team to raise money for the next campaign and you don’t want to go into a campaign without a good war chest in place to be able to launch a good, competitive campaign,” Duguid said.


“All I do is I do the very best that I can to raise as much as I can for the party. We all follow the rules exactly, it’s all transparent. I don’t pay a lot of attention to anything about allocations or how much you should or shouldn’t raise,” he said.


Duguid scoffed at complaints to the Star by former ministers Dwight Duncan and John Gerretsen about their concerns over fundraising process.


“They didn’t say anything when they were here,” he said, though Wynne admitted Gerretsen had expressed his displeasure to her.


Health Minister Eric Hoskins, who brings in as much as $500,000 a year for the Liberals, said helping his party has nothing to do with his official duties.


“My purpose as minister of health is to represent patients in this province and that’s a job I take absolutely seriously day in and day out,” said Hoskins.


“Quite separate from that, I have a responsibility to my party and that is to, following existing guidelines and rules, do my best also to contribute to the Liberal party and those two issues are entirely separate,” he said.


Hoskins noted that fundraising is done by MPPs from all three parties at Queen’s Park.


“There are rules and guidelines that govern that, which I follow.”


The Star’s investigation came on the eve of the Ontario Liberal Party’s $1,600-a-plate Heritage Dinner on Wednesday night, which will collect about $3 million, making it one of Canada’s biggest political fundraisers ever.


With files from Rob Ferguson

http://www.thestar.com/news/qu.....probe.html
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Mar 30, 2016 12:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

How much more of the Wynne government can Ontarians endure?

http://www.thestar.com/news/qu.....-poll.html

I can imagine they are trying to squeeze the patronage gang for all they can get, and then impose 'rules' on fund-raising that hits their opponents hard. Believe me, this gang has an 'angle' on everything.
RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Apr 02, 2016 11:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( wynne seems to have admitted her ministers have fundraising quotas although she didn't exactly answer the question clearly )



Wynne admits Ontario's Liberal cabinet ministers have fundraising quotas



Keith Leslie, The Canadian Press
Published Friday, April 1, 2016 2:59PM EDT



TORONTO -- Premier Kathleen Wynne admitted Friday that Ontario cabinet ministers do have fundraising quotas after ducking the question for most of the week.

The Liberals are accused of selling access to cabinet ministers at high-priced dinners and cocktail receptions for lobbyists, and Wynne promises to introduce new rules on political donations by the fall, but not to implement them before the next election in 2018.

She had refused to confirm that cabinet ministers have individual fundraising targets of up to $500,000, but was pressed on the issue again Friday.

"We're a team, and those conversations (are) between the ministers and the fundraising (managers), we don't necessarily have a joint conversation about what everyone's target is," Wynne said at an Ottawa news conference. "We know that there's an overall objective in terms of what we need to run the party, and we all do our bit."

However, Wynne wouldn't say what that overall fundraising objective is for the Liberals.

"You'll have to talk to the party," she said. "It's the party that raises the money. It's the party that works with all the members to support their fundraising efforts, and it's the same for all of the parties at the provincial level."

The Liberal Party of Ontario did not immediately respond to queries about its fundraising goal each year.

Ontario is looking at the federal political donation rules, which have much lower maximum limits than the province, and also have an outright ban on contributions from companies and unions.

"We are going to be looking at the federal model, where corporate and union donations have been disallowed, and that's where we're going," said Wynne. "There will be a transition into that, and that plan will be brought forward in the fall."

Wynne said the new rules will also address so-called third party advertising. In recent Ontario elections, unions joined together under the Working Families banner and spent more than any political party to buy attack ads against the Progressive Conservatives.

NDP Leader Andrea Horwath doesn't want Wynne and the Liberals to come up with new political donation rules without input from the opposition parties, the chief electoral officer and the public. But Wynne suggested her political opponents can react to the changes the government makes, but not have input as they're drafted.

"We will be bringing forward a plan that there'll be commentary from all sides," she said. "I'll be interested to hear their commentary."

Progressive Conservative Leader Patrick Brown said "something must be done" to change the way Ontario parties raise money, which he warns leads to the perception that cabinet ministers make decisions based on who attends their fundraisers.

The federal contribution rules are simple: people can contribute a maximum of $1,525 to each party annually, plus another $1,525 in total to all the registered associations and candidates of each party.

In Ontario, people, companies and unions can donate $9,775 to a party each year, another $9,975 to the party for each campaign period, plus $6,650 annually to constituency associations of any one party. They can also donate $6,650 to candidates of any one party in a campaign, but no more than $1,330 to a single candidate.

Ontario also has no limits on contributions to political leadership candidates. One young man made a single donation of $100,000 to former Progressive Conservative leadership candidate Christine Elliott in 2014.

http://barrie.ctvnews.ca/wynne.....-1.2841833
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2016 10:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Be careful what you wish for Mr. Brown.

The PCs are millions in debt and while their fundraising has ticked up significantly in the last few months the Liberals who should have a pretty significant warchest could easy opt to take the higher ground and toss in contribution limits on individuals and business' much like the Federal Government did.

Then what?

Patrick Brown is a hard working guy but you basically need to change the way you raise funds midstream and do so while paying down the debt and having an election looming in three years.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2016 12:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think a real question is why do Ontarians not feel a sense of revulsion about this government.

Why does it take a lot of money to get rid of these scoundrels? What does it take to get the inert masses to move?
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2016 3:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( this is coming sooner rather than later it appears , it also mentions third party advertising may be banned ? does that mean the union so called " working families " coalition that advertised heavily against the pc's done and be illegal in the future or did I misread that one ? )

Wynne fast-tracks fundraising reforms to spring, following Star probe

Legislation reforming Ontario’s lax political fundraising rules will be introduced within the next 60 days, says Premier Kathleen Wynne.


Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne will meet this week with Progressive Conservative Leader Patrick Brown and NDP Leader Andrea Horwath to discuss the reforms and said Green Party Leader Mike Schreiner and others are welcome to contribute.

Sean Kilpatrick / CP file photo

Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne will meet this week with Progressive Conservative Leader Patrick Brown and NDP Leader Andrea Horwath to discuss the reforms and said Green Party Leader Mike Schreiner and others are welcome to contribute.

By: Robert Benzie Queen's Park Bureau Chief, Published on Mon Apr 04 2016



Legislation reforming Ontario’s lax political fundraising rules will be introduced within the next 60 days, says Premier Kathleen Wynne.


In the wake of revelations in the Toronto Star last week, Wynne announced Monday that the revamp of the regulations will be tabled in the legislature before the house rises for the summer break on June 2.


The premier, who had initially promised changes this fall, said she expedited matters to the spring because of the mounting public interest.


She will meet this week with Progressive Conservative Leader Patrick Brown and NDP Leader Andrea Horwath to discuss the reforms and said Green Party Leader Mike Schreiner and others are welcome to contribute.


Her move came six days after the Star’s Martin Regg Cohn revealed Liberal cabinet ministers have secret annual party fundraising targets of up to $500,000 each.


While the Liberals have been embarrassed numerous times over the years by media reports on their fundraisers — the Star revealed a private September 2013 $100,000 dinner sponsored by Bruce Power that came as the government was shelving Ontario Power Generation’s new $15-billion nuclear reactors — the ministerial “allotments” appear to be the straw that broke the camel’s back.


The Star discovered Finance Minister Charles Sousa and Health Minister Eric Hoskins have an annual target of up to $500,000 apiece to raise for the Liberals.


Beyond Sousa and Hoskins, senior members such as Energy Minister Bob Chiarelli generate around $300,000 for the Grits while other ministers collect $250,000 or so.




Wynne said Monday the new legislation will ban corporate and union donations to political parties and reduce the amount that individuals can donate.


That would lower the $9,975 annual cap on contributions and end loopholes allowing donors to give much more than that during by-elections and party leadership campaigns.


At the same time, the Liberals plan to ban third-party advertising.


http://www.thestar.com/news/qu.....pring.html
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2016 3:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
I think a real question is why do Ontarians not feel a sense of revulsion about this government.

Why does it take a lot of money to get rid of these scoundrels? What does it take to get the inert masses to move?



her support is mostly in Toronto , outside of there its not as strong in other places . as to why Toronto has rallied behind someone like her and this tired and corrupt government is harder to explain . I think a lot of voters do want to give someone else a change at being government
Steve O





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PostPosted: Tue Apr 05, 2016 10:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My sister who I think is a small L liberal had a free ticket from her boss to go to a fund raising dinner with Wynn as the guest speaker. My sister said that she had never heard so much BS and lies come out of someone's mouth in less than 45 minutes. The fact she (I think) is still a liberal proves that Liberalism is definitely a mental disorder...Steve O
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 05, 2016 11:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
I think a real question is why do Ontarians not feel a sense of revulsion about this government.


If you can answer that question for me,
Then drinks are on me.
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Apr 07, 2016 5:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
Be careful what you wish for Mr. Brown.

The PCs are millions in debt and while their fundraising has ticked up significantly in the last few months the Liberals who should have a pretty significant warchest could easy opt to take the higher ground and toss in contribution limits on individuals and business' much like the Federal Government did.

Then what?

Patrick Brown is a hard working guy but you basically need to change the way you raise funds midstream and do so while paying down the debt and having an election looming in three years.


after watching the coverage on the news at 6 about this , I do worry this scandal is spiraling out of control and Wynne and liberals giving all political fundraising a bad name . what they were doing was clearly beyond the typical political fundraising and crossed the line when lobbyists and corporations were being expected to donate to speak to ministers .
Ontario residents shouldn't though have an issue with typical political fundraising , if someone wants to donate money to the political party they support they should be allowed to do so .
the pc's clearly need to fundraise to pay off there big debts and for next election , the reality is it cost Tim Hudak a lot to lose in 2014 and we haven't even repaid that yet
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Apr 08, 2016 2:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( we now know who some of the liberal donors are listed at bottom , they raised over 1.6 million just for the Whitby by-election and still lost although they could not spend all the money they raised in Whitby )

Ontario Liberals raised $1.6M for just one byelection

Loophole allows donors to give more than annual limit when there's any campaign

By Mike Crawley, CBC News Posted: Apr 08, 2016 5:00 AM ET| Last Updated: Apr 08, 2016 8:17 AM ET

The Ontario Liberal Party lost the byelection in Whitby-Oshawa despite Justin Trudeau's appearance at a rally. But they won in fundraising, amassing $1.6 million during the campaign in this one riding, more than half what they raised during the whole general election of 2014.



Photo of Mike Crawley

Mike Crawley
Provincial Affairs Reporter



Mike Crawley is provincial affairs reporter in Ontario for CBC News. He has won awards for his reporting on the eHealth spending scandal and flaws in the province's new welfare-payment computer system. Mike has lived in five provinces, filed stories from 19 countries in Africa, and once dressed up as a shopping mall Santa Claus for a newspaper feature. He joined the CBC in 2005.



The Ontario Liberal Party used a loophole in the province's campaign finance laws to amass a whopping $1.6 million during a byelection campaign in which the spending limit was $142,000, CBC News has learned.

The fundraising bonanza in Whitby-Oshawa was legal, but it illustrates how parties can use byelections to amass donations far exceeding the cost of the campaign, and how donors with deep pockets can give far more than Ontario's annual spending limits.
■PC leader Brown slams Liberal fundraising as "tainted money"
■Wynne cancels 'private' fundraisers amid criticism of cash-for-access events

Data from Elections Ontario show the Liberals collected $1,632,625 during the campaign period for the byelection, which they lost to the Progressive Conservatives. In comparison, the Liberals collected $2.7 million in donations during the 2014 general election, contested in 107 ridings.

Each party's byelection candidate in Whitby-Oshawa was limited to spending about $142,700. That means Liberals have an extra $1.5 million in their coffers, to spend as they wish.

And a loophole allows them to go back to the same donors who supported them in Whitby-Oshawa for more money this year.

Byelection allows donors to exceed annual limit

The maximum donation to each political party is $9,975 per person or corporation in a calendar year. However, a donor can also give $9,975 separately for each byelection.

Fifty-one donors — mostly corporations — gave the Liberals the $9,975 maximum for the byelection campaign.

Several of those donors have already doubled down, also giving the Liberals separate, significant donations for this calendar year. CN Rail has given another $8,000, the Canadian Generic Pharmaceutical Association another $6,000, and Colleges Ontario — which represents the province's publicly-funded colleges — has given the Liberals $6,000.

This revelation comes amid a furor over political fundraising in Ontario and promises of reform.

The Progressive Conservatives raised $783,809 during the byelection campaign — less than half the Liberal total. Five donors donated the maximum $9,975 to the PCs.

The NDP raised a mere $51,319, with no donor giving more than $1,330, the limit for a donation to a constituency association.

Donors who gave maximum $9,975 to Ontario Liberal Party in Whitby-Oshawa byelection
■Alliance of Community medical and Rehabilitation S
■Apotex Inc.
■Argo Development Corporation
■Artisan Research & Communications Inc.
■AssessNet Inc.
■Barrick Gold Corporation
■Bartimaeus Rehabilitation Services Inc.
■Canadian Generic Pharmaceutical Association
■Canadian Ironworkers Political Action
■Canadian Pharmacists Association
■Canadian Renewable Fuels Association CRFA
■CN Rail (Canadian National Railway Company)
■Colleges Ontario
■Dalton Associates
■Detour Gold Corporation
■Egg Farmers of Ontario
■Eisenberger, Jack
■Falls Management Company
■First National Financial Corporation
■Functionability Rehabilitation services Inc.
■Gamma Dynacare Medical Laboratories Ltd.
■Greater Toronto Airports Authority (GTAA)
■Hinds, James D.
■Huron Wind Inc.
■Insurance Brokers Association of Ontario (IBAO)
■Iron Workers District Council of Ontario
■Lawyers' Professional Indemnity Company (LawPRO)
■Levy, David
■LifeLabs Inc.
■Longo Professional Corporation
■Malone Given Parsons Ltd.
■Morguard Corporation
■Morneau Shepell Ltd.
■Ontario English Catholic Teachers Association OECTA
■Ontario Real Estate Association OREA
■Pedersen, Mike BO
■Power Workers' Union - C.L.C.
■Respon Wealth Management Corp.
■Rideau Carleton Raceway Holdings Ltd
■SC Financial Investments Inc.
■Sorbara Services Limited
■Stoyan, Paul JAMES
■Synoptic Medical Assessments
■Telus Corporation
■The Daniels Corporation
■The Financial Advisors Association of Canada
■The Law Society of Upper Canada
■The Toronto-Dominion Bank
■United Association Canadian Political Action Fund
■Walton Capital Management Inc.
■Walton International Group Inc.


http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/.....-1.3526392
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Ontario liberal cabinet ministers given fundraising targets

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